The Simplicity of Online Will Kits is Their Biggest Shortcoming

June 16, 2021 Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

The appeal of an online will kit is undeniable. Advertisements promise that, for less than $100, anyone can draw up a will in just 20 minutes without ever having to set foot in a lawyer’s office.

While this convenience and low cost will appeal to some, there are significant drawbacks that must be considered when comparing a do-it-yourself document to a traditional Last Will and Testament that a lawyer would prepare.

For example, one of the key selling points of a kit is that it is simple, with few forms to fill out. That should set off alarm bells. Most of us have complicated personal and financial lives. When we die, we will leave behind complex estates that include investments, property, securities and perhaps multiple beneficiaries. A proper estate plan can hardly be captured in the fill-in-the-blank format of an online will kit.

Although these kits claim to cover all the legal issues that govern estate planning, how will you know that they do? If there is a mistake or omission, your beneficiaries will pay the price for the shortcut you took when drawing up your will.

Convenience and a low up-front cost are no substitutes for the advice a wills and estates lawyer can provide. As mandated by the Law Society of Ontario, we constantly take courses to ensure we are aware of new developments in the law. Standardized online kits may not reflect changes brought about by the courts and provincial government.

For example, Bill 245, the Accelerating Access to Justice Act, significantly alters Ontario’s estate laws. As I discussed in a previous post, it makes five major changes to the Succession Law Reform Act. It can be assumed that an online will kit will not address those legislative updates.

The role of the lawyer is to make sure your Last Will and Testament reflects your intentions for your estate after you die. Estate lawyers are versed in the laws of the province, so we can ensure your Last Will and Testament complies with all provincial legislation as it divides up your asset as you desire.

A will drawn up by a legal professional should help avoid uncertainty and court challenges after your death, reducing the fees your estate will have to pay. The more complex your estate, the more important it is to make sure your will reflects that complexity, while clearly laying out your final wishes. An online form that can be completed in 20 minutes pales by comparison.

Another problem with online will kits is that they may be met with court challenges. With a traditional will, clients discuss the details of their estate with a lawyer who can identify problems that may arise in the future, as well as suggest ways to avoid them. Do-it-yourself kits may not effectively address scenarios such as blended families or if you have children with different spouses. These issues require appropriate language when drafting a will – phrasing that an estate lawyer can provide.

Legal counsel can ensure your will is free of vague wording and conflicting or ambiguous provisions. The wording in an online kit may sound professional, but it may not meet the high standard a legal practitioner would bring to the document’s preparation.

Don’t take a chance with the inheritance you want to leave loved ones. You may never know if saving a few hundred dollars on preparing your will was worth it, but your loved ones may if problems arise.

Contact me if you need assistance with drawing up this important document – and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

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