Author: Suzana Popovic-Montag

28 Jul

Estates, Art and Valuations

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning Tags: , , , 0 Comments

This week, we thought it would be interesting to touch on the intersection of law and art in estate planning.

Artwork collections, whether they are comprised of a multitude of works or just one piece, are often a treasured possession of their owners, carrying deep emotional significance and/or high monetary value.

In estate planning, the sentimental and financial aspects of an art collection can become intertwined. Testators and beneficiaries may have competing views. As a simple example, there could be disagreement on whether the art should be sold or kept within the family. That being said, the valuation of artwork is an issue that may often fly under the radar.

The value of an artwork collection can have serious repercussions on the administration of an estate, especially where the estate lacks liquidity to address expenses, such as estate administration taxes.

However, the valuation of art may not always be a clear cut issue, as discussed by Mr. Ronald D. Spencer, Esq. in this article. Value can vary drastically over time, and even where the value remains stable, there may be significant challenges in finding buyers, especially where the collection is large or mostly one artist, potentially burdening the estate with tax liabilities and no certain financial benefit in exchange.

Understanding and articulating one’s wishes concerning their art collection is the first step in minimizing the impact of some of these issues. You will want to set out your intentions and wishes clearly in your will.

Avoiding uncertainty can be achieved through several means. The collection can be distributed through testamentary or inter vivos gifts where appropriate beneficiaries exist. It can be sold, which may carry advantages where the valuation and marketability of the collection is uncertain over time and a potential buyer has been found. Donation to a charitable organization is also an option, with many registered charities dedicated to art.

Whatever path one chooses, it is important to understand the implications from a tax and transactional perspective to ensure the most efficient execution of the testator’s intentions.

For those interested in further reading on art and law, our colleagues at Hull & Hull LLP have written some excellent blogs on the topic here and here.

Thank you for reading and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Raphael Leitz

14 Jul

If You Have Valid Concerns, Don’t Sign a Beneficiary Release

Suzana Popovic-Montag Executors and Trustees, Passing of Accounts Tags: , 0 Comments

If a loved one has died and you are named in the Last Will and Testament as a beneficiary, the estate trustee will probably ask you to sign a release before any assets are distributed. This legal document confirms that you approve how the estate has been administered to date.

As a residual beneficiary, you are entitled to receive a detailed report of all income, expenses, and distributions from the estate, plus be given the chance to review and approve any compensation requested by the estate trustee. These reports should be as complete and informative as possible, so that when you sign the release you feel you are doing so in an informed fashion.

Along with the request for the release to be signed, there should be a statement that makes it clear that you have the option not to sign the release. At this stage, it is a good idea to seek independent legal advice. You may be unsure of the estate accounting, or the level of compensation claimed by the estate trustee, or there could be other issues related to how the estate was handled.

As the court stated in Rooney Estate v. Stewart Estate, “It is not an answer to say that the beneficiary approved of the accounts and gave a release. One of the obligations of the solicitor acting for the trustee is to ensure that all beneficiaries have competent, independent advice in reviewing the accounts. There is no suggestion by the solicitor that he advised the [beneficiaries] to obtain independent legal advice when reviewing the trustee’s accounts which he had prepared.”

It can be expected that the estate trustee will have received a Tax Clearance Certificate from the Canada Revenue Agency, confirming that all monies owing by the deceased and the estate have been paid. If the estate is distributed before this Certificate is received, the estate trustee could be held liable for any unpaid tax debts.

While it is easy to understand why beneficiary releases are commonly sought by estate trustees, Ontario courts have held that it is improper for trustees to withhold payment or delivery of an inheritance if a beneficiary has refused to sign. At this point, a passing of accounts may be the next step.

From the estate trustee’s perspective, a passing the accounts is the easiest way to deal with uncooperative or unreasonable beneficiaries. Approval of your accounts by the court also removes the need to obtain the consent of the beneficiaries.

If the estate trustee has not sought to pass his or her accounts, the beneficiaries may seek a court order that compels that to happen. During this court approval process, beneficiaries can raise any concerns they have with how the estate was handled. The estate trustee will also be able to explain to the court what they did for the estate, why certain expenses were incurred/payments made, and provide justification for any claim for compensation.

As part of this process, the beneficiaries can request and review the estate trustee’s documentation, such as bank statements and invoices received. Having said that, you should have a good reason for contesting the handling of the estate, as an unnecessary or ill-founded challenge may end up costing you greatly. For example, if you are challenging the honesty and integrity of the estate trustee but in the end the court finds they acted ethically and competently, you may have to pay not only your own legal expenses, but also the legal expenses incurred by the estate trustee in defending your allegations.

If you have any questions or concerns about a beneficiary release, it is wise to seek legal counsel before making the decision to sign it.

Thanks for reading – and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

30 Jun

Why Most Canadians Don’t Have a Will

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , 0 Comments

Most things in life are not guaranteed, but one thing most definitely is – death. Although that may be an unpleasant thought for many, we cannot escape from this inevitable truth and should become more comfortable talking about and planning for it.

While a large part of the Canadian population had previously ignored the need for estate planning, the COVID-19 pandemic encouraged people to change their thinking and realize the importance of doing so. In fact, many Canadians took matters into their own hands.

According to a poll conducted by the Angus Reid Institute in 2018, 51% of Canadians did not have a will in place before the pandemic. There were several reasons to explain this lack of estate planning, with the majority being summarized below:

  • 25% think they don’t need to worry about it because they’re “too young”
  • 23% feel it isn’t worth their time because they don’t have enough assets
  • 18% think it’s too expensive to get a will made
  • 8% don’t want to think about dying
  • 5% think it’s too time consuming

There have been general studies conducted to find out why people hesitate to make a will. It has been determined that many people are simply avoiding making tough decisions. But why spend time working hard to accumulate assets during your lifetime only to risk having them be distributed without any consideration of your wishes?

There is no harm in starting your estate planning “early” and then periodically reviewing and updating your will and estate plan after a framework has been established. Revisiting plans every five years, as frequently recommended, would greatly reduce the difficulty and time that would be spent once you are older with a larger and more complicated estate.

As well, the expense that can later be incurred as a result of estate litigation is likely to be higher than the cost of making a will now. Alternatively, if you don’t have a large estate, you can make a simple will yourself, although one should be weary of the complications that arise from not seeking professional advice.

The Coronavirus was the wake-up call many Canadians needed to start thinking about their own estate plans. While it is a relief that the pandemic may soon be behind us, the threat of death never truly goes away. Estate planning is a life-long conversation that should be normalized so that one can ultimately “rest in peace” whenever the time may come.

Suzana Popovic-Montag and Ekroop Sekhon

16 Jun

The Simplicity of Online Will Kits is Their Biggest Shortcoming

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

The appeal of an online will kit is undeniable. Advertisements promise that, for less than $100, anyone can draw up a will in just 20 minutes without ever having to set foot in a lawyer’s office.

While this convenience and low cost will appeal to some, there are significant drawbacks that must be considered when comparing a do-it-yourself document to a traditional Last Will and Testament that a lawyer would prepare.

For example, one of the key selling points of a kit is that it is simple, with few forms to fill out. That should set off alarm bells. Most of us have complicated personal and financial lives. When we die, we will leave behind complex estates that include investments, property, securities and perhaps multiple beneficiaries. A proper estate plan can hardly be captured in the fill-in-the-blank format of an online will kit.

Although these kits claim to cover all the legal issues that govern estate planning, how will you know that they do? If there is a mistake or omission, your beneficiaries will pay the price for the shortcut you took when drawing up your will.

Convenience and a low up-front cost are no substitutes for the advice a wills and estates lawyer can provide. As mandated by the Law Society of Ontario, we constantly take courses to ensure we are aware of new developments in the law. Standardized online kits may not reflect changes brought about by the courts and provincial government.

For example, Bill 245, the Accelerating Access to Justice Act, significantly alters Ontario’s estate laws. As I discussed in a previous post, it makes five major changes to the Succession Law Reform Act. It can be assumed that an online will kit will not address those legislative updates.

The role of the lawyer is to make sure your Last Will and Testament reflects your intentions for your estate after you die. Estate lawyers are versed in the laws of the province, so we can ensure your Last Will and Testament complies with all provincial legislation as it divides up your asset as you desire.

A will drawn up by a legal professional should help avoid uncertainty and court challenges after your death, reducing the fees your estate will have to pay. The more complex your estate, the more important it is to make sure your will reflects that complexity, while clearly laying out your final wishes. An online form that can be completed in 20 minutes pales by comparison.

Another problem with online will kits is that they may be met with court challenges. With a traditional will, clients discuss the details of their estate with a lawyer who can identify problems that may arise in the future, as well as suggest ways to avoid them. Do-it-yourself kits may not effectively address scenarios such as blended families or if you have children with different spouses. These issues require appropriate language when drafting a will – phrasing that an estate lawyer can provide.

Legal counsel can ensure your will is free of vague wording and conflicting or ambiguous provisions. The wording in an online kit may sound professional, but it may not meet the high standard a legal practitioner would bring to the document’s preparation.

Don’t take a chance with the inheritance you want to leave loved ones. You may never know if saving a few hundred dollars on preparing your will was worth it, but your loved ones may if problems arise.

Contact me if you need assistance with drawing up this important document – and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

02 Jun

Request for Production or a Fishing Expedition?

Suzana Popovic-Montag Litigation, Wills Tags: , 0 Comments

When a deceased’s capacity is called into question, medical and legal records are generally a key source of evidence. Having said that, courts will not allow parties to go on a “fishing expedition” with respect to production orders. This issue was recently considered in the case of Young v. Prychitko, 2021 ONSC 3150.

In this decision, the deceased executed his last Will on September 2, 2020 (the “2020 Will“), which provided for the majority of his estate, totalling approximately $500,000, to be distributed to his son, the applicant in the proceeding. The deceased’s daughter, the respondent, filed a Notice of Objection to the 2020 Will, alleging that the deceased lacked capacity and was subject to undue influence at the time of execution. Accordingly, the respondent sought an order for the production of the deceased’s testamentary documents, including his medical, financial and legal records. The applicant argued that the respondent failed to meet the evidentiary threshold to require the production of the aforementioned documents and, as a result, his position was that the order would be premature. Having said that, the applicant’s proposed timetable afforded the respondent with the opportunity to file further evidence in support of her objection at a later time.

In its decision, the court held that, prior to compelling the production of certain documents, it must be satisfied that the evidentiary threshold has been met. This minimal evidentiary threshold, as discussed in Neuberger Estate v. York, 2016 ONCA 191, protects against needless expense and litigation. This is particularly important in the case of small estates, as the costs involved in seeking productions may be disproportionate to the size of the estate. In its analysis, the court considered the following questions:

1) When can someone with an interest in an estate compel the propounder of the Will to prove it in solemn form?

2) How does someone satisfy the above test?

3) If the test is not yet met, what procedure should be followed moving forward?

The court stressed that simply alleging incapacity or undue influence is not enough. Even if there is some evidence to support this point, the court must assess whether the propounder can sufficiently answer the evidence.

In the end, the court held that the respondent’s evidentiary record was insufficient. As such, compelling the production of medical, legal, and financial records at this early stage was determined to be premature and would ultimately be “countenancing a fishing expedition.” The course proposed by the applicant was held to be the most prudent.

Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful day,

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Tori Joseph

19 May

What People Need to Know About Probate in Ontario

Suzana Popovic-Montag Executors and Trustees Tags: , , 0 Comments

The settling of an estate often involves probate, where the court grants someone authority to act as an estate trustee for the deceased. This procedure, set out in the Estates Act, also confirms that the deceased’s will is their last Will and Testament.

Estate trustees can file an application for an estate certificate (previously called “letters probate” or “letters of administration”) at the Superior Court of Justice, in the county or district office when the testator or intestate lived at the time of death. If that probate application is successful, the court issues a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee, evidencing that the person named in the Certificate has the legal authority to deal with the estate and its assets.

To help people avoid common errors when completing this application, the Attorney General provides this guideline.

As our associate Sydney Osmar has noted, people can now file probate applications, supporting documents and responding documents by email to the Superior Court. Sydney’s blog post provides helpful information about sending these documents electronically, with the email address for each court location listed here.

Certificates of Appointment are not always required when it comes to an estate administration, but they may be if:

  • the deceased died without a will;
  • the will does not name an estate trustee;
  • a financial institution requires proof of a person’s legal authority to receive the financial assets of the deceased; or
  • the estate’s assets include land or buildings that do not pass to another person by right of survivorship.

One of the times probate will not be necessary is if the entire estate is held jointly, and all assets are passing to the surviving joint owner by right of survivorship. A scenario might include a husband and wife with a joint bank account and a jointly-owned home. If the husband died and left the entire estate to his wife, probate can be avoided since banks and financial institutions have no risk exposure.

The Estate Administration Tax, better known as probate fees, is charged on the value of the estate if a Certificate of Appointment is applied for and issued. Estate trustees must be able to substantiate the fair market value of the assets at the time of death through documentation, such as financial statements or valuations from appraisers.

Assets to include in determining the value of an estate include real estate in Ontario, bank accounts (including foreign banks), investments, vehicles and insurance (if proceeds are left to the estate).

Once the value of the entire estate is determined, you can then calculate the tax. If the estate is worth $50,000 or less, you do not have to pay any probate fees, although you still must file an Estate Information Return within 180 calendar days after the estate Certificate has been issued.

For estates valued over $50,000, the tax will be calculated as $15 for every $1,000 (or part thereof) of the value of the estate on top of the $50,000 exemption. For example, for an estate valued at $240,000, you would only pay tax on $190,000, resulting in $2,850 being owed to the Minister of Finance.

Use this tax calculator to determine the amount owing.

The probate process can be time-consuming and confusing, which is why many people rely on the services of a wills and estates lawyer to help guide them through the paperwork and procedures.

Please feel free to call me if I can assist you – and have a great day,

Suzana Popovic-Montag

05 May

Changes to Ontario’s Estate Laws

Suzana Popovic-Montag In the News, Wills Tags: , , , 4 Comments

Like many in the estates world, we have been closely following the evolvement of Bill 245, the Accelerating Access to Justice Act, 2021. Initially introduced in February of 2021, Bill 245 significantly alters Ontario’s estate laws. Bill 245 was proposed by the government in an effort to modernize an outdated system – a proposal that was welcomed by those in the estates community. The Estates Bar welcomes these developments and commends the Attorney General’s office for taking these significant steps in updating our legislation to better reflect the realities of life in the 2020s.

On April 19, 2021, Bill 245 received royal assent. The changes to Ontario’s estate laws are enumerated in Schedule 9 of Bill 245 and include the following:

  1. The Succession Law Reform Act (the “SLRA”) is amended to provide for the remote witnessing of wills through the means of audio-visual communication technology for wills made on and after April 7, 2020. The execution of a will in counterparts will now be permitted.
  2. Section 16 of the SLRA, which provides for the revocation of a will upon marriage, except in specific circumstances, is repealed.
  3. Subsection 17(2) of the SLRA is amended to include separated spouses. As such, any gift bequeathed to a spouse will be revoked upon separation.
  4. Section 21.1 is added to the SLRA and provides the Superior Court of Justice with the authority to, on application, make an order validating a document or writing that was not properly executed or made under the Act, if the Court is satisfied that the document or writing sets out the testamentary intentions of a deceased or an intention of a deceased to revoke, alter, or revive a will of the deceased.
  5. Section 43.1 is added to the SLRA to exclude separated spouses from inheriting on an intestacy.

Bill 245 does not, however, affect the rights of common-law spouses.

The repeal of the provision under the SLRA with respect to the automatic revocation of any pre-existing wills by marriage is an important first step in protecting vulnerable older Ontarians from predatory marriage scenarios. Similarly, the updated rights of separated spouses will, in most cases, result in a more appropriate treatment of separated spouses who do not take the step of obtaining a formal divorce.

The new will validation provision to be added to the SLRA will provide the courts with a mechanism to allow the intentions of individuals who may not be aware of the formal requirements for a valid will to be honoured. In the past, we have seen technicalities prevent what was clearly intended to be a will from functioning as one from a legal perspective.

These changes also have the potential to improve access to justice. In particular, the permanence of virtual witnessing provisions for both wills and powers of attorney has the potential to increase access to justice while preserving necessary safeguards in the will execution process. The emergency measures introduced during the pandemic will allow Ontarians improved access to legal assistance in their estate planning, regardless of where in the province they may be located.

The amendments relating to the remote witnessing of wills and counterpart execution are currently in effect. The remaining legislative amendments will not come into force until a day proclaimed by the Lieutenant Governor, which will not be earlier than January 1, 2022.

Thanks for reading and have a wonderful day,

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Tori Joseph

21 Apr

If You Die Without a Will, Here is What Happens

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The great thing about having a Last Will and Testament is that it clearly spells out what happens to your estate upon your passing. Conversely, the terrible thing about not having this document in place when you die is that you have no control over how your assets are distributed, which may cause anguish and hardship to loved ones you would have otherwise chosen as beneficiaries.

When you die without a will, or intestate, Ontario’s Succession Law Reform Act (the “SLRA”) sets out how your estate is distributed. It provides that unless someone who is financially dependent on the deceased person makes a claim, the first $350,000 is given to the deceased person’s spouse.

A problem that immediately arises is defining the meaning of spouse. For the purposes of intestacy, the SLRA adopts the definition of spouse found in section 1 of the Family Law Act, which reads: “‘spouse means either of two persons who: (a) are married to each other, or (b) have together entered into a marriage that is voidable or void, in good faith on the part of a person relying on this clause to assert any right.

As such, only married spouses are entitled to benefit under the intestacy regime. You may have had a long and loving common-law relationship with a person you regarded as a spouse, but if there is no formal wedding declaration, they could be denied the inheritance you wanted them to receive. A common-law spouse may potentially seek redress by making a dependant’s support claim against your estate, though it is an effort and expense that could have been avoided with a proper will.

If you have no spouse, your children will inherit the estate. Sounds simple enough, but again there may be an issue with the way in which the SLRA defines child, as it only accepts biological offspring or those who were adopted as children. With blended families, many people have developed loving and long-lasting relationships with their step-children. In the eyes of the SLRA, however, they are not given the same inheritance rights as biological and adopted children.

Things get a bit complicated from here. Allow me to summarize:

  • If any children have died, that child’s children will inherit their share.
  • If there is no spouse or children or grandchildren, the deceased person’s parents inherit the estate equally.
  • If there are no surviving parents, the deceased person’s brothers and sisters inherit the estate.
  • If any of the brothers and sisters have died, their children (the deceased person’s nieces and nephews) inherit their share.
  • If there are no surviving brothers and sisters, the deceased person’s nieces and nephews inherit the estate equally. (If a niece or nephew has died, their share does not pass to their children.)
  • When only more distant relatives survive (cousins, great-nieces or nephews, great aunts and uncles), the rules are complex and a lawyer’s advice is a good idea.

There are many other problems that arise with those who die intestate, such as deciding who will be executor and oversee the estate distribution. The closest relative is usually chosen by the courts for the position, which may mean that your children are in charge and not your common-law spouse, which could create tension and expensive legal battles.

If you have minor-age children and there is no other legal parent alive, the appointment of the guardian will be out of your control.

Perhaps you have promised your grandson that he will inherit your valued coin collection when you die. That probably won’t happen, since all assets of the estate will be valued and divided up under the SLRA rules. However, in a will you can leave specific instructions, directing who receives what items you are leaving behind.

You may feel indebted to a charity, church, or hospital for their work while you were alive, and you want to leave that institution some money. Again, that can’t happen without a will.

The final point to consider is that if you have no next-of-kin and you die without a will, your entire estate goes to the Ontario government, with the Office of the Public Guardian & Trustee stepping in to administer your estate and seize your assets.

Drawing up a Last Will and Testament is a simple way to avoid all these issues, saving anguish and needless paperwork when the time comes.

Thanks for reading, and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

07 Apr

Don’t Count Your Chickens (or Your Inheritance) Before They’ve Hatched

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, General Interest Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Wage increases are not proportionate to the astronomical rise in the cost of living. As a result, it is not all that uncommon for some to live “pay cheque to pay cheque” – especially those millennials just beginning their careers, starting a family, and hoping to buy property. Even those who have attended graduate programs (many of whom spend several years paying off the massive debt accrued by such ambitions), have double income earning families, and who hold esteemed positions in the workforce, still struggle to put aside any significant amount of money for retirement. Consequently, many young people make the unwise mistake of counting on their impending inheritance to fund their retirement.

According to Ipsos Reid survey, 35% of Canadians are relying on an inheritance to fund their futures. Although baby boomers as a generation possess great wealth, there are several reasons why that fortune might not land in the hands of millennials.

Firstly, individuals might deplete their assets while still living. Given the steady increase in life expectancy, individuals are living longer and correspondingly, their wealth must last longer. For some, this might mean living lavishly in their retirement years and travelling the world. Others who aren’t so lucky might be plagued by illness requiring extensive care. In the latter scenario, savings can be quickly consumed by these unforeseen health care expenses. For context, a private room at a long-term care home in Ontario costs on average $2,640 a month. Retirement homes, not subsidized by the government, cost approximately $3,204 a month if an individual requires assistance.

Another reason why an inheritance should not be counted until it is received is due to the volatility of the stock market. An unexpected downturn in the stock market, or a poor investing decision, could result in a retirement portfolio plummeting and thus no inheritance left to pass along.

Lastly, some parents might share the same beliefs as investing icon Warren Buffett, who infamously remarked that he would leave his children “enough money so that they would feel they could do anything, but not so much that they could do nothing.” A 2014 study by the Insured Retirement Institute confirmed that although in the past over two-thirds of baby boomers reported that they would leave their children an inheritance, this number dropped to just 46% in 2014. It appears that more parents might agree with Buffet’s philosophy than expected. As a result, it seems wise to consider your potential inheritance as a welcome bonus rather than a given.

Thanks for reading – and enjoy the rest of your day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Tori Joseph

22 Mar

Bill C-7 Sparks Strong Pushback from Disability-Rights Organizations 

Suzana Popovic-Montag In the News Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

On November 18, 2020, we blogged about medical assistance in dying (“MAID”) accessibility. We discussed Bill C-7 and the government’s proposal to expand eligibility for assisted death. The government’s proposal was accepted by the Senate on March 17, 2021 and, as such, Bill C-7 is now in effect.

Our previous blog post largely centered on arguments in support of increasing MAID accessibility. What it did not consider was the controversy sparked by Bill C-7, especially in marginalized communities such as the disabled community.

Bill C-7 was initially proposed after a 2019 Superior Court of Quebec decision held that it was unconstitutional to limit MAID to those at the end of their lives. Accessibility to MAID has now been expanded as some of the more onerous conditions have been alleviated. Those eligible to receive MAID now include individuals suffering intolerably from severe illnesses and disabilities with no cure.

Those with disabilities and advocates of this community are concerned that MAID will disproportionately be accessed by individuals with disabilities who do not otherwise have access to adequate social supports. Proponents of the amendments to the legislation argue that there are safeguards in place to protect the floodgates from opening and to protect against legislative abuse. For example, patients who request MAID but are not nearing the end of their life will be informed of various social and communal supports which can assist in alleviating their suffering. However, there is no requirement necessitating those considering MAID to actually access these supports. Further, Bill C-7 requires medical professionals to conclude that the person applying for MAID has given “serious consideration” to their decision. Opponents of the Bill question the subjectivity and ambiguity of this loose requirement … what would actually amount to “serious consideration”?

Are there enough protective measures in place? Are these proposals encouraging ableism and fueling already pervasive stereotypes in our society?

Disability-rights organizations would answer the former in the negative and the latter in the affirmative. On February 24, 2021, over 125 Canadian organizations signed an open letter urging the government to reconsider the amendments proposed in Bill C-7. The letter states that “Bill C-7 sets apart people with disabilities and disabling conditions as the only Canadians to be offered assistance in dying when they are not actually dying.” Studies have shown that individuals with disabilities have higher rates of depression and more frequent occurrences of suicidal thoughts in comparison to the general public. Those who oppose Bill C-7 argue that the underlying causes of suffering must be addressed, such as the institutional and social problems causing suffering. They argue that these problems often outweigh any physical suffering.

Of course, not all individuals with disabilities find Bill C-7 to be offensive. For some, the expansion of MAID represents hope and the prevention of intolerable suffering. Suffering is subjective and individuals will now be able to decide when/if their suffering becomes too intolerable. For these people, MAID is a humane exit from a life that is too unbearable to be endured.

Thank you for reading, and enjoy the rest of your day,

Suzana Popovic-Montag and Tori Joseph

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