Giving money to charity? Know your options to maximize your impact.

June 7, 2017 Suzana Popovic-Montag Charities, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

While direct donations of cash or securities are still king when it comes to charitable giving in Canada, there are many other ways to donate. If you’re considering a larger gift, it pays to look at some alternatives.

A little bit of planning and a look at different options ensures that charitable gifts are made in the most tax- effective manner possible, are directed to the charities you most want to support, and are best suited to your financial situation and needs.

Here are some options to consider.

Bequests

 A charitable gift made in your will can be claimed against up to 100% of your net income on your final two lifetime tax returns. If the bequest is too large to claim on the final return, the surplus can be carried back to the previous tax year. There are several types of bequests possible:

  • Specific bequests: an amount or specific piece of property paid out before any residual gifts
  • Residual bequests: a share or percentage of the residue of estate
  • Contingent bequest: the naming of an alternate charitable beneficiary in case the terms of an original bequest can’t be met 
  • Bequest subject to a trust: a trust established at death that typically provides lifetime income to one or more named beneficiaries, and a future gift to one or more charities.

Bequests can be tricky if not executed properly. This article provides details on the key pitfalls to avoid:

http://www.globalphilanthropy.ca/images/uploads/Bequests_-avoiding_problems_with_the_ultimate_planned_gift_May_14_2008_Ontario_Bar_Association.pdf

Life insurance

 There are several ways that you can make a substantial but affordable gift using life insurance. 

  • Buy a new life insurance policy and name your charity as the owner and beneficiary. The premiums you pay qualify for a charitable tax receipt. 
  • Donate an existing policy to a charity. You’ll receive a charitable tax receipt for the fair market value of your life insurance policy.
  • Name a charity as the beneficiary of an existing policy. Your estate will receive a charitable tax receipt when the proceeds are paid to the charity.

Private charitable foundation

 A private charitable foundation is a trust or corporation that you establish and operate for charitable purposes. It’s a permanent institution – carrying your name or legacy, or that of a loved one – through which charitable work may be funded. Because of the costs of establishing and operating a foundation, you likely need initial funding of several hundred thousand dollars to make the structure worthwhile.

Private charitable foundations can be complex structures to establish and administer, so make sure you rely on professional advice for your foundation’s creation and operation.

Donor-advised funds

 Donor-advised funds are a flexible and cost-effective alternative to establishing a private charitable foundation.

You start by donating a lump sum amount – typically $10,000 or more – to a charitable gift fund administered by either a charity or a financial institution. Like a private charitable foundation, you receive a tax credit for the full amount donated, up to 75% of your net income for the year. Any excess amounts can be carried forward for up to five years to generate tax credits in those years. Each year, you direct to what charities you want grant money given and in what amounts.

Here’s a detailed comparison of private charitable foundations versus donor-advised funds:

https://www.jlmphilanthropy.com/blog/2016/3/29/a-foundation-or-a-donor-advised-fund-which-way-to-go

Other options

There are a number of other planned giving options as well, from beneficiary designations of an RRSP or RRIF, to charitable remainder trusts, to charitable gift annuities.

But if you weigh all your options, and decide to make a simple direct gift, the Canada Revenue Agency’s charitable donation tax credit calculator is a great way to get an estimate of the tax impact of your donation:

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/chrts-gvng/dnrs/svngs/clmng1b2-eng.html

Thanks for reading,
Suzana Popovic-Montag

 

 

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