Tag: dispute resolution

20 Oct

Improving Dispute Resolution for the Last Stages of Life

Suzana Popovic-Montag Capacity, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Health / Medical, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

On October 1, 2021, the Law Commission of Ontario released its Final Report focusing on legal issues related to palliative care, end-of-life care and medical assistance in dying (collectively described as “last stages of life”).

One of the major areas for reform identified in the Report is dispute resolution for persons who are dying and those who support them. On this point, the Report notes:

Death, dying, and bereavement are highly emotional and important experiences for everyone involved – patients, family, friends and health care providers. Conflicts in the last stages of life may revolve around health care decision-making, a preference for treatment, or concerns about the quality of care being provided. Disagreements can take place in multiple care settings about many different matters. Disputes may involve patients, SDAs [substitute decision-makers], family members, health care facility and providers.

Current mechanisms in place for resolving disputes during the last stages of life include accessing the Consent and Capacity Board (a tribunal created under the Health Care Consent Act that adjudicates disputes related to capacity and decision-making), or the Superior Court of Ontario. For people in care, the Final Report also notes that some health care facilities have a “step up” dispute resolution process that can be accessed, for example, when communications between substitute decision-makers and treatment teams become polarized, which brings in bioethicists, risk managers, social workers or spiritual chaplains to provide information and guidance.

However, these measures can also fall short when dealing with conflicts arising during end-of-life care. The Final Report points out:

  • Not all facilities have a “step up” dispute resolution process, meaning not all patients and substitute decision-makers have access to an early dispute resolution process before applying to the Consent and Capacity Board.
  • The Consent and Capacity Board may not hear all disputes that deal with end-of-life care and may decline jurisdiction if:
    • there is a dispute as to the validity of a Power of Attorney for Personal Care or a dispute over who is authorized to act as an individual’s substitute decision-maker;
    • a patient or substitute decision-maker applies for directions because their wishes are not being followed by the patient’s treatment team; or
    • a physician withholds or withdraws treatment and declares a patient dead or brain dead, and thus no longer a patient.
  •  Some patients also die before their applications are heard by the Consent and Capacity Board.
  • It can take months to appeal a decision from the Consent and Capacity Board to the Superior Court. Currently, the Health Care Consent Act provides that appeals from Board decisions are to be scheduled “at the earliest possible date compatible with a just disposition”, but does not specify any actual timelines.
  • Proceedings in the Superior Court, such as an appeal or an application for an emergency injunction, tend to be more complex and expensive than proceeding before the Consent and Capacity Board, and are often delayed, making them less suitable for end-of-life disputes where time is often of the essence.

After consulting with the public, focus groups and experts, and commissioning multiple expert research papers on topics salient to the last stages of life, the Law Commission has made a number of recommendations, including:

  • The introduction of province-wide informal mediation services for end-of-life care, which would serve as an early dispute resolution mechanism and could be accessed by patients, substitute decision-makers (such as powers of attorneys), health care providers, and health care facilities.
  • A review of the mandate and jurisdiction of the Consent and Capacity Board, including updating the Board’s powers to be more responsive to end-of-life cases.
  • Amending the Health Care Consent Act to expedite appeals from the Consent and Capacity Board to the Superior Court of Justice that involve the last stages of life.

At this time, it is unknown whether the recommendations of the Law Commission will be implemented. However, in the meantime, a step that individuals can take to reduce potential conflicts and disputes from arising during the last stages of life is engaging in advanced health care planning. The Final Report notes:

Not enough people are planning for the last stages of life … Planning has been shown to improve patient outcomes; ensure alignment between a person’s values and treatment; lessen family distress; decrease hospitalizations and admissions to critical care; and decrease unwanted investigations, interventions, and treatments. Yet fewer than 1 in 5 Canadians have engaged in advance care planning.

Steps that you can take today include:

  • appointing a substitute decision-maker, such as a Power of Attorney for Personal Care, to make decisions on your behalf;
  • discussing your wishes, values, and beliefs with your substitute decision-maker. The Final Report points out that “[t]he law is clear that [substitute decision-makers] must consider the patient’s prior capable wishes, values, and beliefs, if known and applicable.”
  • completing an advance directive or “living will,” which sets out your wishes in terms of future care.

Thanks for reading, and have a great day!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

 

For further reading on advance care planning, see the following blog posts:

A Gift to Consider: The Importance of Proper Advanced Medical Care Planning

The ultimate “selfie”: Video record your health care wishes

Advance Care Planning for COVID-19

Encouraging Discussion About End-of-Life Wishes

Plan Well Guide’s Toolkit for Legal Practitioners: Helping You Help Your Clients Plan for Incapacity

12 Nov

Mediation or Arbitration – What’s the Difference?

Kira Domratchev Estate & Trust, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In the estates regime, mediations occur regularly, particularly in Toronto, where mediations are a mandatory part of the litigation, in accordance with Rule 75.1.02(1)(a)(i) of the Rules of Civil Procedure.

A mediation is always an opportunity to attempt to settle a matter without resorting to costly and time consuming litigation. At mediation, the parties will each stay in separate rooms and the mediator (that is usually chosen by the parties to the litigation), will shuttle between the rooms seeking a more in-depth understanding of the parties’ positions as well as probing opportunities for settlement. Sometimes, before the mediation begins, the mediator will do an introduction to all the parties before they break off into separate rooms, explaining how the day will go.

An important aspect of mediation is the fact that a mediator has no decision-making power. He or she cannot force the parties to settle but can provide his or her opinion on the issues. As such, settlement at mediation can only be reached upon the agreement of the parties themselves.

Another means of dispute resolution (other than litigation) that is not often resorted to in estate litigation, is arbitration. Before agreeing to attend an arbitration, however, it is important to consider whether this form of dispute resolution would be helpful in the particular circumstances of the matter.

Arbitration, unlike mediation, is an adversarial dispute resolution process (similar to litigation) determined and controlled by a neutral third party. The arbitrator can make a final decision, called an “award”, contrary to a mediator, who cannot. The most significant aspect of arbitration, however, is that the courts generally do not interfere in a dispute that is subject to an arbitration agreement. As such, there is a risk that should a decision be made by an arbitrator, the court would then refuse to hear the matter further, leaving arbitration as the ultimate medium of resolving the particular matter.

Why is that so important?

In a situation where the parties have already engaged in settlement negotiations and there appears to be a gap between their respective positions, an arbitration may be worthwhile to pursue, particularly should litigation be untenable to the parties given the cost involved and/or if the matter in dispute does not involve a lot of money. In such a situation, a final arbitral award may bring finality and allow the parties to move on, particularly if the gap between the parties’ positions is not significant.

If, however, the parties had not yet engaged in negotiations and no offers to settle were made, pursuing arbitration may be a serious gamble. That is so because the issues to be arbitrated are set out by the parties and though the arbitration process is similar to traditional litigation, the arbitrator will not have an opportunity to hear all the relevant evidence. As a result, agreeing to arbitrate in a situation like that may cause prejudice to a client who may then not be able to appeal the “award” made by an arbitrator, outside of the regime put in place by the Arbitration Act, 1991, SO 1991, c 17.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Mandatory Mediation

Nine Mediation Pitfalls to Avoid

Arbitration: A Valuable Alternative

16 Oct

What is the Best Way to Say No?

Hull & Hull LLP Continuing Legal Education, General Interest, Litigation, Mediators Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

As lawyers, whether we are dealing with opposing parties, clients, or colleagues, we are often faced with having to say no at some point.  Viewed as a negative response, the effect of saying no often leads to damaged or strained relationships.

As such, it was with great delight that I was able to attend a recent CPD program by Martin Latz (founder of the Latz Negotiation Institute), titled, How to Say No and Preserve the Relationship.

Below is a brief overview of the rules that Mr. Latz espouses:

Rule #1 – Information is Key – at the outset it is important to determine your goals and then develop an information bargaining strategy.  Ways to get and share information should be considered.  Obtaining information is key before providing any response.

Rule #2 – Understand the Meaning of No – before saying no, Mr. Latz suggests that you consider the best alternative to a negotiated agreement.  Referred to as ‘BATNA’, this is widely used in negotiation theory to think about what your plan B is.  Mr. Latz further suggests that, at this time, steps should be taken to strengthen this plan.

Rule #3 – Explain your No with Fair Objective Criteria – if you are going to say no, explain why.  This should be based on fair and objective criteria such as market-value, precedent, professional standards, or tradition.

Rule #4 – Combine your No with a ‘Yesable’ Offer – Mr. Latz suggest that you design an offer-concession strategy.  Considerations should be had to the timing of making such an offer.

Rule #5 – Control the Setting – if you are going to say no, consider the importance of the setting on the relationship.  For instance, there may be value in having a face to face discussion as opposed to over the telephone.

Of course, this is just an overview of the issues Mr. Latz discussed.  I encourage you to visit Mr. Latz’s website at www.negotiationinstitute.com for more information.

Noah Weisberg

Consider this blog interesting?  Please consider these other related blogs:

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