Tag: wills

11 Jun

Can a Death Note Ever be Considered a Will?

Kira Domratchev Capacity, Estate & Trust, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The general rule, one that most people are probably familiar with when they think of a Will, is that the testator has to have the requisite capacity in order to be able to execute it. But what does that mean?

Generally, it means that a person should be of sound mind and understanding and have sufficient capacity to appreciate the various dispositions of property that would be put into effect with his or her execution of the Will. In other words, the testator must:

(1) understand that they are giving their property to one or more objects of his or her regard;

(2) have the capacity to comprehend the extent of their property and the nature of the claims of others to whom they are giving nothing under the Will.

In the case of a deceased who committed suicide, a question that may arise is whether a person who is about to commit suicide has the appropriate testamentary capacity to be able to execute a Will?

In that regard, it is important to remember that the onus is on the person who is propounding the Will – in other words applying to the court for an order that the Will is valid. In the usual course, there is certainly no presumption against the testamentary capacity of a testator. Indeed, it is quite the opposite. However, in cases where a proposition is made that a death (suicide) note is the last valid will and testament of a testator, it is more likely that someone may object. That is especially the case where an expected beneficiary is disinherited under such a circumstance.

 

 

As soon as capacity is called into question, the onus lies on the party propounding the Will to affirm testamentary capacity.

Suicide, in itself, does not equate to testamentary incapacity – although it is a circumstance that may be considered. In fact, a testator may have testamentary capacity even if they are not of entirely sound mind. That means that prior to committing suicide, a person can very well have testamentary capacity. If that is the case, then a death note can be considered a Holograph Will, which in Ontario, in accordance with section 6 of the Succession Law Reform Act, has the following requirements in order to be valid:

(1) It must be entirely in the testator’s hand writing; and

(2) It must be signed by the testator.

There is no requirement for witnesses in the case of a Holograph Will and it must be that the testator intended to dispose of their property after death.

Thanks for reading.

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Testamentary Capacity and Suicide

Will Drafting and Testamentary Capacity

Age and Testamentary Capacity

29 May

Hull on Estates #547 – Test for Mutual Wills

76admin Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Doreen So discuss the test for mutual wills in the decision of Rammage v. Estate of Roussel.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Doreen So.

 

07 May

The Inconvenience of Counsel is Not Grounds for a Change of Venue

Doreen So Continuing Legal Education, Estate & Trust, General Interest, In the News, Litigation, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

 

A motion to transfer an estate matter that was commenced in the Brantford Superior Court of Justice to the Toronto Estates List was recently considered in the Estate of Byung Sun Im, 2018 ONSC 2223.

The procedure to be followed in a Rule 13.1.02 motion to transfer is set out in the Consolidated Provincial Practice Direction (at Part III, B) when the request to transfer pertains to a proceeding in the Central East, Central West, Central South and Toronto Regions.  Motions to transfer should be brought, in writing, to the court location which the moving party is seeking to transfer the matter.  Therefore, if you are seeking to transfer a matter to the Toronto Estates List, then the written motion should be filed with the Toronto Estates List.

Given that the plaintiff (or applicant) has a prima facie right to select the venue of a proceeding (subject to any applicable statutory requirements), the onus is on the party that seeks a transfer to satisfy the test set out in Rule 13.1.02(2). 

In this particular case, the action was predominately based on an estate trustee’s dealings with estate assets.  The deceased, the estate trustee, the majority of the beneficiaries, and the main estate assets were located in Toronto.  The one person in Brantford was the plaintiff.

However, various interim orders and smaller issues were dealt with in Brantford.  Prior proceedings related to this Estate were also decided and disposed of in Brantford.  Justice Firestone agreed that the location of the assets had little bearing on how the assets ought to be divided.  He also noted that there was an absence of evidence related to the convenience of the witnesses in addition to the convenience and location of the parties themselves.  The convenience of counsel is not a basis to order the transfer of a proceeding.

 

Ultimately, the moving party failed to satisfy the test set out in Rule 13.1.02(2):

“… the court may, on any party’s motion, make an order to transfer the proceeding to a county other than the one where it was commenced, if the court is satisfied,

(a) that it is likely that a fair hearing cannot be held in the county where the proceeding was commenced; or

(b) that a transfer is desirable in the interest of justice, having regard to,

(i) where a substantial part of the events or omissions that gave rise to the claim occurred,

(ii) where a substantial part of the damages were sustained,

(iii) where the subject-matter of the proceeding is or was located,

(iv) any local community’s interest in the subject-matter of the proceeding,

(v) the convenience of the parties, the witnesses and the court,

(vi) whether there are counterclaims, crossclaims, or third or subsequent party claims,

(vii) any advantages or disadvantages of a particular place with respect to securing the just, most expeditious and least expensive determination of the proceeding on its merits,

(viii) whether judges and court facilities are available at the other county, and

(ix) any other relevant matter.  O. Reg. 14/04, s. 10.”

Thanks for reading!  For those of you who are also interested in the Practice Directions for the Toronto Estates List, you may access them here.

Doreen So

 

30 Apr

When Will the Court Appoint a Guardian?

Rebecca Rauws Guardianship Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, S.O. 1992, c. 30 (the “SDA”), governs,  among other things, the appointment of guardians for incapable persons. There are two types of guardians: a guardian for property and a guardian for personal care.

Sections 22(1) and 55(1) of the SDA provide that the Court may, on any person’s application, appoint a guardian of property or of the person, for a person who is incapable of managing property or personal care if, as a result of the said incapacity, it is necessary for decisions to be made on his or her behalf.

In order to appoint a guardian for someone, the Court will need to make a finding of incapacity for that person. This is an important hurdle, and the Court will generally need to see evidence that the person in question has been assessed as incapable of managing property and/or personal care prior to making a finding that he or she is incapable.

Depending on the circumstances, a person may submit to a capacity assessment voluntarily. However, according to section 78(1) of the SDA, if a person refuses to be assessed, an assessor shall not perform the assessment. Section 79 of the SDA allows the Court to order that a person be assessed, provided that the Court is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe the person is incapable. Additionally, to obtain a Court Order for an assessment, there must be a proceeding under the SDA, in which the person’s capacity is in issue. The Ontario Court of Appeal in  Neill v Pellolio, 2001 ONCA 6452 held that there is no stand-alone relief available for an Order for a capacity assessment in the absence of an application brought under the SDA. Accordingly, obtaining a finding of incapacity from the Court may not be a simple endeavour.

The SDA also has in place measures to protect an individual’s decision-making rights from undue restriction. Sections 22(3) and 55(2) state that the Court shall not appoint a guardian if it is satisfied that the need for decisions to be made will be met by an alternative course of action that does not require the Court to find the person incapable, and is less restrictive of the person’s decision-making rights than the appointment of a guardian.

Accordingly, for example, if a person has already granted a power of attorney, allowing the named attorney to act would constitute a less restrictive course of action which also does not require the Court to make a finding of incapacity in order for decisions to be made for an incapable person. Furthermore, if a person is incapable of managing their property or personal care, but remains capable of granting a power of attorney, that would likely also constitute a less restrictive course of action, and would allow that person to exercise their decision-making rights.

Thanks for reading.

Rebecca Rauws

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

13 Mar

Essential Evidence Series for Estate Litigators

Noah Weisberg Continuing Legal Education, General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

It is with great pleasure to announce that myself, Ian Hull, and Lionel Tupman will be co-chairing a professional development program on Essential Evidence for Estate Litigators through the OBA.

The program has been created specifically for estate litigators and will run over three evenings on April 5, May 17, and June 6, 2018.

Details of the program can be found by clicking here.

This program is a must for anyone who litigates in the area of estates, wills, and trusts!

Noah Weisberg

09 Mar

Invalid Will Therefore Invalid Insurance Beneficiary Designation? Not Necessarily

Hull & Hull LLP Beneficiary Designations, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

An insured may designate a beneficiary of the proceeds of a policy of insurance. This can be done by a beneficiary designation that is signed by the insured. No other formality is required.

An insured may also designate a beneficiary of a policy of insurance in a will.

What happens, however, if the will is found to be invalid?

Section 192(1) of the Insurance Act provides that a designation in an instrument purporting to be a will is not ineffective by reason only of the fact that the instrument is invalid as a will.

This may be due to the different procedural requirements of due execution of a will, versus the minimal procedural requirements of the execution of a beneficiary designation. Thus, a document signed by the testator/insured but not witnessed by two witnesses may be ineffective as a will, but may be effective as a beneficiary designation.

Different considerations may apply where the will is found to be invalid on the basis of lack of testamentary capacity. If the testator/insured is found to be incapable of executing a will, it may follow that he/she is incapable of executing a beneficiary designation. However, the applicable  burden of proof may lead to a finding that one is incapable of signing a will, but capable of signing a beneficiary designation. In Fawson Estate v. Deveau, 2016 NSCA 39 (CanLII), the Court of Appeal was faced with a case where a will executed on April 23, 2004 was found to be invalid. The estate trustee then moved for summary judgment in a separate proceeding brought to declare beneficiary designations executed shortly before and after the execution of the Will invalid. The motion for summary judgment was dismissed, as the judge found that there was a genuine issue for trial. The Nova Scotia Court of Appeal agreed.

In dismissing the appeal, the Court of Appeal referred to the different burdens of proof. In the will challenge, the burden was on the will challenger to show suspicious circumstances. The burden then shifted to the propounder to show that the testator had testamentary capacity. In the challenge to the beneficiary designations, the burden was said to be on the challenger, throughout, to show that the insured did not have capacity to execute the beneficiary designations.

In a case of undue influence, a will found to be invalid due to undue influence may not necessarily mean that the insurance beneficiary designations were the result of undue influence: a separate analysis is required.

In conclusion, when considering rights and remedies in the face of a potentially invalid will, do not immediately assume that an invalid will means that insurance beneficiary designations contained in the will are invalid as well. A deeper analysis of the reason for the invalidity is necessary.

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

06 Mar

B.C.’s Wills, Estates and Succession Act: Claims May be Pursued by Beneficiaries

Rebecca Rauws Executors and Trustees, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In Ontario, if there is a claim to be made or continued by a deceased person or their estate, any such claim must be brought by the executor or administrator of his or her estate. If there is no executor or administrator, under Rule 9.02 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, RRO 1990, Reg 194, the court may appoint a litigation administrator, who will represent the estate for the purpose of the proceeding. A beneficiary or other person may also represent the interests of an estate, under Rule 10.02, where it appears that an estate has an interest in a matter in question in a proceeding.

In British Columbia, section 151 of the Wills, Estates and Succession Act, SBC 2009, c. 13  (“WESA”) provides an alternative way of pursuing a claim by an estate. Section 151 states that a beneficiary of an estate may, with leave of the court, commence proceedings in the name and on  behalf of the personal representative of a deceased person, either to recover property or enforce a right, duty or obligation owed to the deceased person that could be recovered or enforced by the personal representative, or to obtain damages for breach of a right, duty or obligation owed to the deceased person. Section 151(3) outlines the circumstances in which the court may grant leave in this regard:

(3) The court may grant leave under this section if

(a) the court determines the beneficiary or intestate successor seeking leave

(i) has made reasonable efforts to cause the personal representative to commence or defend the proceeding,

(ii) has given notice of the application for leave to

(A) the personal representative,

(B) any other beneficiaries or intestate successors, and

(C) any additional person the court directs that notice is to be given, and

(iii) is acting in good faith, and

(b) it appears to the court that it is necessary or expedient for the protection of the estate or the interests of a beneficiary or an intestate successor for the proceeding to be brought or defended

In a document produced by the Government of British Columbia entitled “The Wills, Estates and Succession Act Explained” (“WESA Explained”), section 151 is described as overcoming a gap in the law. Previously, if a beneficiary wished for an action to be brought on behalf of an estate, and the personal representative refused to do so, the beneficiary’s sole recourse would be to apply for removal of the personal representative.

However, removal may not always be necessary or convenient. As described in WESA Explained, such a situation could arise in the event that the personal representative’s main concern (as is often the case with executors, generally) is to preserve and distribute the estate. The personal representative is therefore likely more risk adverse and conservative in assessing the potential success of pursuing an action. The  beneficiary may have differing views on the merits of the claim, and in his or her assessment of the risk and return.

Section 151 of WESA differs from the process for litigation administrators and representation orders in Ontario in that s. 151 allows the executor and beneficiary appointed to bring a claim on behalf of the estate to co-exist simultaneously.

The concept of s. 151 is similar to a derivative action, in which a shareholder or other person is permitted to bring an action on behalf of a corporation, where the corporation refuses to do so.

Thanks for reading.

Rebecca Rauws

 

Other blog posts you may find interesting:

27 Feb

Is interest payable on legacies?

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Executors and Trustees, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

An Ontario Court of Appeal decision released yesterday provides clarity regarding the situations in which beneficiaries of legacies will be entitled to interest on the sum payable to them under a Last Will and Testament.

In Rivard v Morris, the testator had held farmland of significant value.  A prior Will left a farm of comparable value to each of his daughters (as the testator had previously gifted a farm property to his son), and divided the residue of the estate equally between the three children.  In the months preceding his death, however, the deceased amended his estate plan to provide for a greater benefit to his son, leaving him the residue of his estate (inclusive of the farm properties) after distributions to each daughter in the amount of $530,000.00.

After the testator died, the daughters challenged his Last Will on the basis of alleged undue influence.  The will challenge was unsuccessful.  The daughters subsequently commenced another proceeding after their brother (the sole remaining estate trustee after their previous resignations) refused to pay to the sisters interest with respect to the legacies of $530,000.00.  They argued that they were entitled to interest commencing one year after the date of their father’s death, notwithstanding that the payment had been delayed in part because of the will challenge initiated by the daughters.  Any interest would have been payable out of the assets to which their brother was otherwise entitled as sole residuary beneficiary of the estate.

The daughters were unsuccessful at the hearing of their application and appealed.  The Court of Appeal found in their favour.  Justice Paciocco ordered the payment to each daughter interest in the amount of $53,000.00 out of the residue of the estate.  In doing so, Justice Paciocco relied upon the “executor’s year” and the “rule of convenience”.  In describing the rule of convenience, Justice Paciocco stated as follows (at paragraphs 24, 25):

The “rule of convenience” can be easily explained, in my view.  One of the maxims of equity is that it presumes as being done that which ought to be done. Since the beneficiaries should be enjoying the earning power of their legacies by at least the anniversary date of the testator’s death, where that enjoyment is postponed and the testator has not provided an alternative date for payment of the legacy, interest is to be paid…This general rule has been adopted in Ontario.

The rule of convenience was considered by the Court of Appeal to promote certainty and predictability, and the lower court’s decision to deny the daughters’ interest on the basis that they had commenced litigation against the estate was said to be contrary to principle, as this would have the impact of discouraging “even meritorious litigation”.  While the Court of Appeal did neither confirmed nor denied whether judges are able to exercise discretion to deny interest to beneficiaries of legacies, it found that it had been inappropriate for the application judge to do so in this case.

Thank you for reading,

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

27 Dec

Hull on Estates #536 – Lost Wills and Rebutting the Presumption of Revocation

76admin Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In today’s podcast, Paul Trudelle and Sayuri Kagami discuss the court’s reasons for finding that the presumption of revocation had been rebutted in Levitz v Hillel Lodge Long Term Care Foundation, 2017 ONSC 6253 where an original will was lost.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Sayuri Kagami.

14 Dec

What can an estate lawyer do to address language barriers?

Nick Esterbauer Capacity, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, In the News, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently read an article that features a discussion of issues relating to seniors living in the “Little Tokyo” neighbourhood of downtown Los Angeles.  In the context of North America’s aging population, the residents of Little Tokyo are becoming increasingly isolated, both socially and linguistically.

Nearly half of L.A.’s senior population was born outside of the United States, with almost one-third unable to communicate well in English.  Over half of the inhabitants of Little Tokyo are “linguistically isolated” and live alone, factors which have the potential to create barriers to accessing healthcare and other services, including legal assistance.

In multicultural cities like L.A. or Toronto, lawyers often encounter clients, both young and old, whose first languages are not English.  It can be helpful to obtain the assistance of an interpreter when we are not fluent in the same language as our clients.  Below, I briefly summarize a couple of points relating to language barriers that may be important for estate lawyers to keep in mind:

  • In Ontario, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice will normally process Certificates of Appointment of Estate Trustee only in respect of wills that are written in one of Canada’s official languages.  Section 125(2)(b) of the Courts of Justice Act otherwise specifies that documents filed in courts written in another language, including wills being admitted to probate, must be accompanied by a certified translation.  Especially if a will can be prepared in English and translated to the client at the time of its execution, this may represent an unnecessary expense and cause for delay in obtaining probate.
  • When working on matters involving the rights of an incapable person, a language barrier may skew the results of a capacity assessment.  The Public Guardian and Trustee’s list of designated capacity assessors includes a number of professionals who are able to conduct assessments in languages other than English, for more accurate results.  In the event that a person is determined to suffer from cognitive issues and the parties seek the appointment of counsel under Section 3 of the Substitute Decisions Act, it is best to propose the appointment of a lawyer who speaks the individual’s native language.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

 

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