Tag: vacation

06 Aug

Off-site funerals

James Jacuta Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Funerals, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

With the summer vacation now at the midpoint, many people are travelling as part of their holidays. But, what can one do when a friend or family member dies while you are on vacation? Does your trip have to be cut short? Are there additional charges to be paid for changing dates on plane tickets and for hotel room cancellations?  Not any longer. In many cases, a livestream funeral service is now available. Some companies provide this service via the internet. Or, depending upon the funeral home, wireless can be used to stream the memorial service using facetime or skype. There are even websites that provide information and assist with the planning of the do-it-yourself camera work.

There are many advantages for those who cannot attend even if not on vacation. Other reasons to not attend in person might be because of illness, distance, cost or other barriers.  Now almost everyone can attend from wherever they are.

Also, the funeral service can be archived and watched again online. This can be of benefit not only to those who could not attend the service in person but also to family members who were there. It can help in dealing with their loss or to simply remember things that were missed in the immediate grief of the service. Technology has developed rapidly. It has become accepted and has recently extended into the areas of wills and estates, providing services such as online obituaries instead of publishing in newspapers; advertising for estate creditors using online services instead of much more expensive newspaper print notices; cataloging and registering the location of wills (in some jurisdictions); assisting lawyers in automated interactive drafting of wills (like the Hull e-State Planner); recognizing the validity of electronic wills (in some jurisdictions); among others. The trend towards even more changes coming in this area is strong and there is hope that expanding technology use will serve to assist friends and family members through difficult times.

Thanks for reading!
Jim Jacuta

05 Sep

Dying for a cruise? What about dying on a cruise

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

Our estate litigation practice by its nature concerns end of life issues. And while no one expects the “end of life” to happen on a vacation, we’ve been involved in many estate files where that’s been the case. We’d like to think that vacation time is sacred, but the grim reaper begs to differ.

While an unexpected death on land is hard enough for family members to deal with – especially if the body has to be repatriated from a foreign country – a sudden death at sea feels all the more daunting. Where can they store the body? How long can they keep it? Where and how can you take the body off the ship in port? The answers are “in an on-ship morgue,” “about seven days,” and “taking the body off the ship depends on several factors, like the laws of the next port and the country of registration of the ship.”

Floating morgue

Yes, cruise ships have body bags and a morgue. They don’t have much choice – about three people die of natural causes each week on cruise ships. In terms of the body repatriation process for family members on board, it can vary depending on the ship and where it’s sailing. In some situations, the body can be taken off the ship at the next port. In others, it will be taken off when the ship returns to its home port. For extended cruises that take months to complete, arrangements will be more complex.

The silver lining in all of this is that because sudden deaths at sea are a weekly event, cruise line staff have procedures and training to support surviving family members and help them make arrangements.

This article from Cruise Critic provides a good overview of what happens when a death occurs on ship.

Cruise for your retirement?

On a more positive note, this CNBC article explores the emerging trend of retiring on a cruise ship, rather than living in an adult community or a retirement residence on land. It can actually be an affordable alternative to more conventional retirement choices.

Thanks for reading … Have a wonderful day,
Suzana Popovic-Montag

29 Aug

What are you reading this summer?

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, In the News, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The association between “reading” and “summer” may not be as strong as it used to be, but it’s a tough association to shake. A couple of generations ago, there was lots of time for summertime reading. Television had summer reruns (so not much to watch) and vacations were often modest (cottage, camping, road trips). There was plenty of down time.

Fast forward to today and the introduction of new summer shows plus the addition of Netflix means there is compelling television in every season. And vacations often involve a plane ride and a more active exploration of countries abroad. Reading can sometimes take a back seat.

That said, like the bell ringing for Pavlov’s dogs, when the first summer heat wave comes I want to have a book on the go. With Canada Day marking the beginning of the summer season for most of us, it seems fitting to look to Canadian writers for our summer reading inspiration.

The CBC has compiled a list of 100 must-read Canadian novels. If you’re looking for a good place to start, this is it.

Many (but by no means all) of these novels fall into a category that some would call serious literature – which might involve a little more heavy lifting by the reader than a crime thriller. That said, there are thrillers on the list, such as Linwood Barclay’s No Time for Goodbye.

And if you prefer to consider your book selection by author rather than title, the CBC has conveniently listed the “100 writers in Canada you need to know now.” From the humour of Terry Fallis, to the thrillers of Andrew Pyper and Sheri Lapena, to the extremely popular poetry of Rupi Kaur, you’re sure to find a book that makes your summer special.

Thanks for reading!
Ian Hull

01 Aug

A different approach to work-life balance

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

A recent Globe and Mail article on vacation time caught my eye. In it, Elizabeth Renzetti notes an ADP Canada study that found that:

  • only one in three employees take all their allotted vacation time each year
  • 28% take less than half of their allotted time; and
  • nearly one-third of people admit to working during their holidays.

Renzetti points to a number of possible reasons for this – from affordability, to holding multiple jobs, to the fear that our employer will realize we’re dispensable if we’re gone and work life carries on. It’s complicated, but for whatever reason it seems that we North American workers aren’t as good as our European counterparts (who have much more generous vacation laws) at taking time off. As a result, the notion of work/life balance tilts strongly in favour of work.

Stop stressing – return to your roots

I think the work/life balance needs a new metaphor – and that’s the work/life tapestry. As a farming society 200 years ago, there was no separation of work life and personal life. You lived and worked on the farm and almost all of your life was based there. The change began in the industrial revolution, when factory work created a clear separation between a work life and a home life.

What technology is doing is bringing us closer to our agrarian roots. The separation is blurring, and for many of us, is once again non-existent. We can fight it – and try to recapture that separation – or we can accept it and support it. Personally, I think the smart answer is to accept and support it, because this is a change that I think is as inevitable as the change brought about by the industrial revolution.

Yes, employers can play a key role in supporting this tapestry, by providing employees with the flexibility and support they may need to address other issues that are happening in their life. But employees have a role too in accepting that our personal lives will sometimes creep into our work, and vice versa. Rather than stress about the fact that you need to take a morning on your Tuscan vacation to join a telephone conference, embrace the fact that technology now enables us to phone a client in the morning and bike the hills of Italy in the afternoon.

Perhaps we’d all take a little more time off we worried a little less about crossing work/life boundaries and embraced a tapestry approach.

Thanks for reading,
Ian Hull

24 Jun

The Growing Popularity of “S.K.I.-ing”

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Estate Planning, General Interest Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

As the population continues to age and individuals are living longer, healthier lives, various demographic changes are developing.

One trend among seniors in good health is to spend several months of the year travelling abroad.  Such activity was historically limited to wealthier members of the population, who could afford to retire early and/or take long periods of time away from work.  However, according to a recent article in the Daily Mail, more and more British seniors are spending their retirements travelling and are funding the expeditions by what is referred to as “S.K.I. – Spending the Kids’ Inheritance”.

ANAXNZSAJ0A new BBC series called the Millionaire’s Holiday Club follows older travellers as they explore the world with ITC Luxury Travel Group.  While there is clear desirability behind spending money that would otherwise form assets of one’s estate on travel, some of the individuals credit other reasons as motivation for spending more money than they otherwise might on vacations.  Some participants of the television series wish to leave their children an inheritance sufficient to allow for financial security, but not so large that it discourages them from working to earn a living and funding their own luxurious travel.  Others report that they choose to travel as a way of remaining independent as they age.

For some seniors, travelling without a travel insurance plan risks incurring significant healthcare costs in a foreign jurisdiction.  Due to costs that typically increase with age, travel insurance may be less accessible for older individuals who choose to travel, and especially those who have experienced serious or chronic health conditions.  Depending on age and medical history, travel insurance simply may not be an option, and should be a serious consideration of a senior in deciding whether or not to travel.  While there is nothing wrong with enjoying oneself by frequent travel, older individuals should be careful to ensure that they retain enough money to fund their ongoing costs of living, which can significantly exceed projected costs with time and the deterioration of physical and/or mental health.

Have a great weekend.

Nick Esterbauer

07 Aug

Vacation and Recreational Properties – Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Podcast #72

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to "Vacation and Recreational Properties"

Read the transcribed version of "Vacation and Recreational Properties"

This week on Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Ian and Suzana discuss litigation involving vacation and recreational properties. This is an emotional as well as a legal issue. They talk about the realities of passing properties on to younger generations.

Click "Continue Reading" for the transcribed version of this podcast.

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