Tag: Trustee Act

10 Jul

Notice to Creditors…Online

Noah Weisberg Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, In the News, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Debt owing by an individual does not terminate upon death.  The estate trustee is therefore obliged to satisfy any outstanding debts owing from the assets of the estate even after an individual has passed away.  I recently came across a new service which assists estate trustees in locating any such debts in order to satisfy them.

Generally speaking, an estate trustee is not personally liable for debts owed by the deceased.  However, if debts remain and the estate trustee distributes the assets of the estate, they may be personally liable to satisfy them.  In order to avoid  personal liability, estate trustees advertise for creditors in accordance with section 53 of the Trustees Act, often referred to as Notice to Creditors.  According to this section, an estate trustee will not be personally liable for claims by creditors should they place a ‘notice’ specifying a period of time in which claims by creditors must be made.  It is important to note that a Notice to Creditors does not prevent creditors from tracing distributable assets to beneficiaries.

The Trustee Act does not specifically provide how such a ‘notice’ must be posted.  However, it has become common practice to advertise multiple times in a local newspaper where the deceased domiciled, and wait at least 30 days before taking steps to administer the estate.

A new service, NoticeConnect, publishes these notices to creditors online.  According to the creators of the site, “…publishing notices with NoticeConnect is superior to print advertising because the notice will be found by any creditor conducting a basic Google search and because the ad is promoted across multiple internet platforms with larger potential audiences than print newspapers”.

Furthermore, proceeding online “…is an economical option for the many solicitors and estate trustees who are not publishing Notice to Creditors because of prohibitively high costs, exposing themselves to potential liability”.

Full details of the service provided by NoticeConnect can be found on their website.

Noah Weisberg

10 Mar

Protecting a Trustee from Liability (Part II)

Hull & Hull LLP Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Today’s blog is part II in my series this week regarding the protection that may be available to a trustee against potential liability.

Apart from the provisions of the trust document itself, a trustee’s potential liability may be protected, limited or exonerated in a number of ways by statute.   Some examples are sections 18(1), 20(3), 28 and 29 of the Trustee Act (“Act”). 

 

Section 28 of the Act provides that a trustee is not liable for a loss to the trust arising from the investment of trust property if the conduct of the trustee that led to the loss conformed to a plan or strategy for the investment of the trust property, comprising reasonable assessments of risk and return, that a prudent investor could adopt under comparable circumstances. Section 29 of the Act provides that if a trustee is liable for a loss to the trust arising from the investment of trust property, a court assessing the damages payable by the trustee may take into account the overall performance of the investments.

 

The application of the Limitations Act should also be considered.

 

Also, in considering a trustee’s potential liability in respect of his or her administration of the trust, a trustee ought to consider his or her conduct and whether that conduct may be exonerated, if necessary, by the Court under section 35 of the Act. As a way of balancing the rights of beneficiaries with the interest to not overburden trustees, s.35 of the Act holds that when a breach occurs, the Court has the discretion to relieve the trustee of liability in cases where it believes that the trustee acted honestly and reasonably and ought fairly to be excused.

With some exception, the Court therefore has a statutory discretion to grant trustees relief from liability if they have acted honestly and reasonably, and ought fairly to be excused.  

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Craig

22 Dec

Section 35: Saving Provision for Gotcha! Litigation

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Executors and Trustees, Litigation, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Trustee Act can be a responding solicitor’s best friend.  Consider section 35, which excuses trustees for technical breaches of trust where the elements are met:

"35. (1)  If in any proceeding affecting a trustee or trust property it appears to the court that a trustee, or that any person who may be held to be fiduciarily responsible as a trustee, is or may be personally liable for any breach of trust whenever the transaction alleged or found to be a breach of trust occurred, but has acted honestly and reasonably, and ought fairly to be excused for the breach of trust, and for omitting to obtain the directions of the court in the matter in which the trustee committed the breach, the court may relieve the trustee either wholly or partly from personal liability for the same."

This helpful section can eliminate Gotcha! claims and provides a ready response to frivolous accusations that often arise in the course of litigation.  By eliminating nuisance claims for minor breaches, section 35 gives solicitors acting for trustees a very quick answer to the minor types of claims that add little substance to already complex litigation.   

However, this provision does not apply to liability for a loss to the trust arising from the investment of trust property (Trustee Act, s.35(2)).

Have a great week, and remember, it’s really Wednesday.

Chris Graham

 

22 Jul

Cases for Increasing and Decreasing Compensation – Hull on Estates and Succession Planning podcast #122

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Cases for Increasing and Decreasing Compensation.

This week on Hull on Estates and Succession Planning, Ian and Suzana discuss cases for increasing and decreasing compensation.

Comments? Send us an email at hullandhull@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-457-1985, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estate and Succession Planning blog.

24 Jun

The Investment Accounts – Hull on Estates and Succession Planning Podcast #118

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Passing of Accounts, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to The Investment Accounts.

 

This week on Hull on Estates and Succession Planning, Ian and Suzana conduct a quick lesson on capital encroachment and discuss the role of investment accounts in the passing of accounts.

 

Comments? Send us an email at hullandhull@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-457-1985, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estate and Succession Planning blog.

30 Jan

Tips and Traps in Drafting – Hull on Estates #95

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Listen to Tips and Trips in Drafting.

This week on Hull on Estates, Suzana and Ian discuss tips and traps in the drafting of wills.

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estate blog.

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14 May

Can Delegates Delegate?

Hull & Hull LLP Archived BLOG POSTS - Hull on Estates Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

While it is often said that an attorney can do anything on behalf of the grantor except make a Will, this isn’t really so. For instance, while a grantor can delegate decision-making authority to his or her attorney, an attorney generally can not sub-delegate such authority to someone else unless it is in respect of administrative tasks.

This issue was the subject of a paper recently presented by Anne Werker, one of our firm’s Associate Counsel, at the Six-Minute Estates Lawyer 2007. In particular, she focuses on the difficulty an attorney faces when dealing with investment decisions, the main type of decision that in many cases ought to be made by a specialist. Anne notes that historically, both attorneys and estate trustees were prohibited from delegating such decisions to others. However, since 2001* trustees have been allowed to have investment counsel make investment decisions for them (subject to certain conditions). No like legislative or common-law permission has been granted to attorneys.

So, what is an attorney to do when faced with the obligation to manage an investment portfolio, particularly a sophisticated one? Anne notes that one way to cope is for a grantor to include in the power of attorney a clause expressly granting the power to delegate investment authority. She also offers some helpful precedents for the content of such a provision in her paper.

However, even if that measure is taken, the question of whether such sub-delegation is valid has not yet been answered. Rather, questions remain about what formalities, if any, are necessary to validate sub-delegation, about whether third parties will refuse to contract with an attorney’s agent, and about whether they would face liability for dealing with a sub-delegate acting under an invalid power of attorney.

I expect that the answers will vary on a case-by-case basis, and that it may take a while before any uniformity develops in this area in the absence of legislative change.

Have a nice day.

Natalia Angelini

* further to amendments made to the Trustee Act, as a result of Haslam v. Haslam (1994), 114 D.L.R. (4th) 562.

12 Mar

Commonly Encountered Will Interpretation Problems

Hull & Hull LLP Archived BLOG POSTS - Hull on Estates, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

I am excited to be “back on”, so to speak, with another opportunity to shed some thoughts on estate matters. In particular, I have the pleasure this week of posting snippets of a wonderful article prepared by Rodney Hull, Q.C., who himself has been swept up by the whole concept of social media. Rodney has graciously allowed me to share with you the following …

RECOGNIZING SOME COMMONLY ENCOUNTERED INTERPRETATION PROBLEMS

Each problem faced by practitioners in determining the meaning of words used in a Will can be dealt with by:

(1) Identifying the problem by its name or subject;

(2) Giving an example of wording that raises the problem;

(3) Stating the facts or circumstances pertinent to the problem;

(4) Stating the questions raised; and

(5) Pointing out where the problem has been treated in a general way, i.e. where to start research of the problem.

In many cases, one cannot achieve certainty as to the meaning of words used in a Will and, in those circumstances, one is well advised to bring an Application for interpretation before the Court under Rule 14 of the Rules of Civil Procedure in order to indemnify the personal representative by acting on the Court’s interpretation (as provided in section 63 of the Trustee Act).

If such an Application to the Court is not economically viable and the personal representative is prepared to act on counsel’s opinion, counsel giving the opinion should point out the provisions of section 63 of the Trustee Act to the personal representative. He or she should consider including a clause in his or her opinion along the following lines, “While my opinion as to the meaning of the words of the Will is based upon legal principles and proper research, the matter is not without some doubt and, as I have advised you, the personal representative can only act with certainty of indemnification by seeking the Court’s advice and direction as provided in section 63 of the Trustee Act”.

Tomorrow, we’ll get into some actual interpretation problems …

All the best –  Suzana.

26 Sep

Hull on Estates Podcast #27 – Compensation of an Estate Trustee Continued

Hull & Hull LLP Executors and Trustees, Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

LISTEN HERE

READ THE TRANSCRIBED PODCAST

During Hull on Estates Episode #27, we continued our discussion on the compensation of an estate trustee, including the pre-taking of compensation and the exclusion in Section 61 of the Trustee Act regarding fixing compensation in the instrument creating the trust.

 

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