Tag: Travel

03 Jul

Sleeper trains – nostalgia for something we may never have done

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

When was the last time you slept (lying down) on a train? Or a better question: have you ever slept lying down on a train?

My guess is “no” , or, if you have, it was a long time ago. While overnight rail service played a role in Canada’s past, it’s no longer a preferred mode of travel. Multi-lane highways and cheap flights have replaced overnight rail service for most of us.

Still, there’s something alluring about the train. Maybe it’s the romance of exotic railway routes, like the Orient Express or the Trans-Siberian – trains that are still running today. Even if you’ve never slept on a train, you’ve likely read a book or article – or seen a movie – about these trains with their closed cabins and worlds of intrigue.

The sleeper train to Scotland

It’s this romantic nostalgia for something I’ve never done that hooked me on the news that Scotland is introducing a totally new sleeper service between London and many destinations north this summer. These totally new trains are made for the modern traveller. Some cabins have their own shower and bathroom, the mattresses are top notch, and all the mod-cons (like wifi) are onboard. You can read about it here.

The thought of leaving a world city like London at night and waking up in the morning to the Scottish Highlands whizzing by made me want to book an overnight journey. I haven’t yet, but it’s a trip that’s definitely on my list.

There’s a whole world of trains

Of course, the news of the new train in Scotland got me looking at other sleeper train journeys. There are many. Some are luxurious (there are some high-end ones in India and Africa), but many others are just interesting journeys by rail. This Lonely Planet guide to 10 amazing train journeys is worth a read.

And no matter your vehicle of choice, if you’re taking a trip this summer, happy travels!

Thanks for reading,
Ian M. Hull

17 May

Lawyers at Borders

Paul Emile Trudelle Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

On May 5, 2019, CBC reported on a story of a lawyer who had his cell phone and laptop seized by the Canada Border Services Agency when he refused to give them his passwords.

According to the report, Nick Wright was returning to Canada after a 4 month trip to Guatemala and Colombia. After his bags were searched, the Canada Border Services officer asked for the passwords to his phone and laptop, so that they could be searched as well. Wright refused, telling the officer that his devices contained confidential solicitor-client information. His devices were then confiscated, to be sent to a government lab which would try to determine the passwords and search the files.

According to Canada Border Services, digital devices are classified as “goods”, and Canada Border Services is allowed to examine the goods, including any electronic files on the device, for customs purposes. If a traveller refuses to reveal their password, Canada Border Services may seize the device. According to the policy manual, although an arrest would “appear to be legally supported, a restrained approach will be adopted until the matter is settled in ongoing court proceedings.”

U.S. customs and border protection officials have similar rights to search devices. Refusal to disclose passwords may result in confiscation or a denial of entry.

Such digital device searches do not occur frequent. In the 17 months between November 2017 and March 2019, 19,515 travellers entering Canada (0.015% of all travellers) had their digital devices examined by Canada Border Services.

The Canadian Bar Association warns about the risks of such searches to lawyers. Lawyers have a duty to keep client communications private. This applies to all information about a client or former client. The duty extends to staff, as well. “Your client has a right to privacy which requires you not to disclose to anyone, with exceptions, when any communications between you relate to legal advice sought or given.”

The Canadian Bar Association says that a breach could result in a loss of client trust, a client lawsuit for negligence, an E&O claim, disciplinary action and public criticism.

The Canadian Bar Association suggests that when crossing a border, lawyers should travel with a “clean device”. They should use cloud technology to store any solicitor-client information. Lawyers should erase all privileged information from their devices, including contact lists with clients’ names, addresses and contact information. The search by border services does not allow them to access information on the cloud. Once across the border, this information can easily be reinstalled from the cloud.

Happy travelling.

Paul Trudelle

04 Jul

Travel much? Currency exchange is getting easier

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

We’ve seen it first hand in many estates situations: families with property and assets in different countries. In the estate administration process, this can present a host of problems if proper planning hasn’t been done.

But just dealing with foreign property day-to-day has its challenges. And banking and currency issues are front and centre. Do you need to open a local bank account? What’s the best way to transfer money in different currencies? Is there an easy way to pay ongoing bills and taxes in your foreign country of choice?

Cheaper transfers

Banks have had a lucrative monopoly over money transfers and foreign currency transactions for some time – and costs are high. If there was an area of banking that was ripe for innovation, this was one of them.

Enter TransferWise – a UK-based fintech company that has turned the currency conversion and transfer process on its head. The key innovation is that TransferWise doesn’t move money across borders. The system works on a peer-to-peer basis – if someone wants to convert their Canadian dollars to euros, TransferWise finds someone who wants to transfer money in the opposite direction (euros into Canadian dollars). As a result, Canadian dollars stay in Canada and euros stay in their euro country.

There are no fees hidden in the exchange. You get the mid-market exchange rate – the one you’ll find in the financial press. TransferWise then adds its fee to each transaction. The fee is clearly disclosed, so you know exactly what you’re paying. More importantly, the cost of the transfer is far less than what you’d get with one of the banks, the company claims up to 8 times less. You can find the Canadian site here.

International debit card coming

TransferWise just announced the next stage in its evolution – with the Canadian launch next year of a borderless debit MasterCard. The card will let you hold and spend a balance in multiple currencies, and, again, with lower fees than traditional banks.

TransferWise is just one of several innovative companies that are changing traditional banking in different parts of the world – but its focus on Canada sets it apart, at least for now. So, if you travel widely, or have assets abroad, you will soon have a new option for money management.

Thank you for reading,
Ian Hull

24 Jun

The Growing Popularity of “S.K.I.-ing”

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, Elder Law Insurance Issues, Estate Planning, General Interest Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

As the population continues to age and individuals are living longer, healthier lives, various demographic changes are developing.

One trend among seniors in good health is to spend several months of the year travelling abroad.  Such activity was historically limited to wealthier members of the population, who could afford to retire early and/or take long periods of time away from work.  However, according to a recent article in the Daily Mail, more and more British seniors are spending their retirements travelling and are funding the expeditions by what is referred to as “S.K.I. – Spending the Kids’ Inheritance”.

ANAXNZSAJ0A new BBC series called the Millionaire’s Holiday Club follows older travellers as they explore the world with ITC Luxury Travel Group.  While there is clear desirability behind spending money that would otherwise form assets of one’s estate on travel, some of the individuals credit other reasons as motivation for spending more money than they otherwise might on vacations.  Some participants of the television series wish to leave their children an inheritance sufficient to allow for financial security, but not so large that it discourages them from working to earn a living and funding their own luxurious travel.  Others report that they choose to travel as a way of remaining independent as they age.

For some seniors, travelling without a travel insurance plan risks incurring significant healthcare costs in a foreign jurisdiction.  Due to costs that typically increase with age, travel insurance may be less accessible for older individuals who choose to travel, and especially those who have experienced serious or chronic health conditions.  Depending on age and medical history, travel insurance simply may not be an option, and should be a serious consideration of a senior in deciding whether or not to travel.  While there is nothing wrong with enjoying oneself by frequent travel, older individuals should be careful to ensure that they retain enough money to fund their ongoing costs of living, which can significantly exceed projected costs with time and the deterioration of physical and/or mental health.

Have a great weekend.

Nick Esterbauer

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