Tag: substitute decision-maker

30 Sep

What can you do if you Suspect that a Loved One is no longer Capable?

Rebecca Rauws Capacity Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Something that no one ever wants to deal with, but which is sometimes an unfortunate reality, is the incapacity of a loved one. You may notice that your spouse or parent is not themselves, or has acted in a way that causes you some concern.

If the person has a power of attorney for property and a power of attorney for personal care, the attorney(s) named in those powers of attorney may need to step in and begin to manage the person’s finances and care. The terms of the power of attorney may set out when the attorney can begin acting. For instance, some powers of attorney for property are effective immediately upon execution by the grantor, and continue to be in effect in the event of any subsequent incapacity.

The power of attorney may also outline what kind of confirmation of the grantor’s incapacity is necessary before the attorney may begin acting on the grantor’s behalf. If the grantor is willing to cooperate in whatever capacity assessment is required, this step may be simple and straightforward to complete. However, as is often the case, the person may resist acknowledging any decline in their capacity or cognition, and may not wish to have their capacity assessed.

Pursuant to s. 78(1) of the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992 (the “SDA”), a person must consent to having their capacity assessed. If they refuse to be assessed, the assessor is precluded from performing an assessment.

If a person refuses to be assessed, it is possible to seek a court order for an assessment, pursuant to s. 79(1) of the SDA. In order to do so, the following will be required:

a) the person’s capacity must be in issue in a proceeding under the SDA; and

b) the court must be satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person is incapable.

As a capacity assessment can be an intrusive process, the court takes requests to order them very seriously, and will often not be quick to order one. As discussed in Abrams v Abrams, [2008] O.J. No. 5207, some of the factors that the court will consider in making a determination in this regard include the following:

i) the purpose of the SDA, being to protect the vulnerable;

ii) the nature and circumstances of the proceedings in which the issue is raised;

iii) the nature and quality of the evidence before the court as to the person’s capacity and vulnerability to exploitation;

iv) whether the assessment will be necessary in order to decide the issue before the court;

v) whether any harm will be done if an assessment does not take place; and

vi) the wishes of the person sought to be examined, taking into account his or her capacity.

Thanks for reading,

Rebecca Rauws

 

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09 Mar

Plan Well Guide’s Toolkit for Legal Practitioners: Helping You Help Your Clients Plan for Incapacity

Arielle Di Iulio Capacity, Elder Law, Health / Medical, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Last year, my colleague Nick Esterbauer blogged about the Plan Well Guide – a free online tool to assist individuals with their advance care planning. An advance care plan sets out how a person wishes to be treated during a serious illness or health crisis. The Plan Well Guide helps users to create a ‘Dear Doctor’ Letter explaining their values and preferences with respect to their future medical care, which can then be given to their physician and substitute decision-makers to ensure that their wishes are known. For a more in-depth look at the Plan Well Guide and the process of creating a Dear Doctor letter, you can read Nick’s blog here.

Recently, the Plan Well Guide launched a new toolkit designed for legal practitioners. This free online toolkit is intended to help lawyers help their clients become better prepared for future serious illness and incapacitation. In addition to various educational resources for both lawyers and their clients, the toolkit includes:

  • a sample power of attorney for personal care;
  • a sample advanced health care directive;
  • a sample personal directive;
  • a sample ‘Dear Doctor’ letter; and
  • a step-by-step guide on how lawyers can incorporate the Plan Well Guide into their practice.

Of course, the sample legal documents contained in the toolkit should be amended to reflect the client’s specific set of circumstances and the laws of the applicable jurisdiction.

What I like most about the Plan Well Guide’s new toolkit is that it highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to advance care planning. An effective advance care plan – that is, a plan which facilitates medical substitute decision-making that is consistent with the incapable person’s actual values and preferences – depends on the collaborative efforts of a person’s lawyers, doctors, and substitute decision-makers. The Plan Well Guide and its new toolkit offer accessible ways for legal professionals, health care professionals, and their clients/patients to coordinate their efforts to make serious illness planning more effective. If a lawyer is interested in improving the quality of future medical decision-making and patient outcomes for their clients, the Plan Well Guide’s toolkit for legal practitioners is certainly worth looking into.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

15 Dec

What Happens When Substitute Decision Makers Cannot Agree?

Arielle Di Iulio Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

The highly anticipated COVID-19 vaccine is being rolled out in Ontario, with some of the first shots having already been administered yesterday. The University Health Network in Toronto and The Ottawa Hospital will be the first to administer the vaccine. Frontline healthcare workers in hospitals, long-term care homes, and other high-risk settings will be given priority. Vaccinations are expected to expand to residents in long-term care homes, home care patients with chronic conditions, and First Nation communities and urban Indigenous populations later in the winter of 2021. The province has not said when vaccines will become available for every Ontarian who wishes to be immunized. However, once available, the province confirms that vaccines will not be mandated but strongly encouraged.

The mass administration of the COVID-19 vaccine could be a real game changer in the battle against coronavirus. However, a recent public opinion poll conducted by Maru Blue shows that only one-third of Canadians would take the vaccine immediately, about half of Canadians would bide their time to assess its safety or use, and the rest have no intention of getting the shot at all. So it appears that Canadians are somewhat divided on the question of whether and when to get vaccinated.

Given the difference of opinion regarding this new vaccine, it is not inconceivable that multiple substitute-decision makers (SDMs) could disagree on whether to give or refuse consent to the shot on behalf of an incapable person. How would such a disagreement be resolved?

First, it is important to note that Ontario’s capacity legislation sets out a hierarchy of SDMs.  Pursuant to section 20 of the Health Care Consent Act (HCCA), the guardian of the person is at the top of this hierarchy, followed by an attorney for personal care, representative appointed by the Consent and Capacity Board (CCB), spouse or partner, parent or children, siblings, any other relatives, and lastly the Public Guardian and Trustee (PGT). The decision of the highest ranking SDM will prevail over dissenting opinions from those who are lower on the hierarchy.

If there are multiple equally ranked SDMs acting with respect to a particular decision, they all have to be in agreement – the majority does not rule. If the SDMs fail to reach a consensus, any of the SDMs could apply to the CCB to try and be appointed the sole representative to make the decision.  However, this option is not available where the incapable person already has a guardian of person or attorney for personal care. Another option is for the SDMs to attend mediation to try to come to an agreement. If mediation is not successful, the health practitioner must turn to the PGT for a decision. Section 20(6) of the HCCA states that the PGT is required to act and cannot decline to act in this situation.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

03 Dec

New Advance Care Planning Toolkit

Rebecca Rauws Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Recently, the Advance Care Planning in Canada initiative, led by the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association, released a new resource to assist with advance care planning and choosing a substitute decision maker.

The “Speak Up” initiative includes two complementary resources.

One resource is the “Living Well, Planning Well” legal toolkit. The development of this toolkit was funded by Health Canada. The legal toolkit was designed to be used by lawyers and their clients, to encourage conversations and reflections about clients’ wishes for advance care planning, and putting appropriate arrangements in place.

The other resource is a public toolkit. It provides plain language information regarding the laws and processes with respect to advance care planning and substitute decision-making throughout Canada. This is helpful as the laws can vary between the provinces and territories.

It is very important to consider advance care planning, and to implement plans as early as possible. In particular, everyone should consider executing a power of attorney, to ensure that they are able to select the person responsible for making decisions on their behalf when they are no longer capable. Without a power of attorney, in Ontario, the ultimate decision as to who will make decisions on an incapable person’s behalf (other than those captured by the Health Care Consent Act, 1996), is left to the court. The court takes such matters very seriously, but most people prefer that the choice of substitute decision maker be their own.

Something else to contemplate is speaking with your family and friends, especially with your named attorney, regarding your wishes. As we enter the holiday season, and plan gatherings with our friends and family, consider taking this opportunity to have a conversation in this regard.

You can review Speak Up’s post about the release of their toolkit here.

Thanks for reading,

Rebecca Rauws

 

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