Tag: Statutory Guardianship

13 Jun

Hull on Estates #522 – Limitation Periods and Statutory Guardianship

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Today on Hull on Estates, Suzana Popovic-Montag and Umair Abdul Qadir discuss the recent decision of the Honourable Justice McNamara in Shaw v Barber, 2017 ONSC 2155, regarding the tolling of the limitation period for dependant’s relief claims under Part V of the Succession Law Reform Act when the Office of the Public Guardian and Trustee is acting as the statutory guardian for an incapable person.

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03 Jul

Guardianship Applications – The Perspective of the Public Guardian and Trustee (PGT)

Natalia R. Angelini Guardianship Tags: , , 0 Comments

It is helpful in assisting our clients in statutory guardianship matters to get the PGT’s perspective. Dermot C.G. Moore did so in his paper presented at the Six-Minute Estates Lawyer on May 6, 2015. In it he comprehensively reviews the several factors that come into play in statutory guardianship applications, including:

  1. Who can apply – he discusses the differences in who can apply for guardianship of property and guardian of the person, and as replacement guardians (only certain persons can replace the PGT as statutory guardian of property: (i) the incapable person’s spouse; (ii) the incapable person’s relative; (iii) an attorney for property that does not grant authority over all the incapable person’s property (rare); and (iv) a trust corporation, if on consent of the incapable person’s spouse/partner (uncommon).
  2. Interim Arrangements – in statutory guardianship applications, the PGT will manage the incapable person’s property until the application is processed.
  3. Deferral to act – the PGT may decide to defer all or part of the administration for a short period of time where a replacement is likely and the finances of the client can be dealt with appropriately in the interim.
  4. Timing – statutory guardianships are often a more difficult route for applicants, as the PGT has more direct access to information, asks more questions and the process generally takes longer.
  5. Complexity – the time taken to process statutory applications is lengthened by a variety of factors, including self-represented applicants, the administrative process and competing applications.
  6. Security – security requirements in non-resident applicants are stricter in statutory applications.
  7. Refusals – the PGT may refuse the statutory application on the broad grounds of there being reasonable grounds to believe the applicant is unsuitable or the management plan is inappropriate.  Mr. Moore’s paper cites several other specific grounds that have resulted in applications being denied.

Thanks for reading and have a great weekend,

Natalia Angelini

08 Aug

The Power of the Public Guardian and Trustee

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Last night, I overheard a distressed woman confiding to a friend about a relative who was declared incapable of managing her property. The Public Guardian and Trustee (“PGT”) had stepped into her shoes to take control and to care for her property. This case peaked my curiosity, so I went home and did some research on this topic. 

Pursuant to Section 15 of the Substitute Decision Act (“SDA”), the PGT can be declared a person’s statutory guardian of property where a certificate is issued under the Mental Health Act (“MHA”) certifying that a person who is a patient of a psychiatric facility is incapable of managing property. Whenever a patient is admitted to a “psychiatric facility”, as defined by the MHA, a physician examines the patient to determine if he or she is capable of managing property. If the physician determines that the patient is not capable of managing property, then he or she must issue a certificate of incapacity. The certificate is subsequently sent to the PGT. As a result, Section 15 is triggered and the PGT steps in as the statutory guardian without any procedural requirement.

Pursuant to Section 16 of the SDA, the PGT can be declared a persons statutory guardian of property where a person requests an assessor to perform an assessment of either their capacity or another person’s capacity. This assessment is done with the view of determining whether the PGT should become the statutory guardian’s of the property. If a person wishes to request that an assessor perform an assessment of another person’s capacity, the person requesting the assessment must: (i) have reason to believe that the other person may be incapable of managing property, (ii) have made reasonable enquiries and have no knowledge of the existence of any attorney under a continuing power of attorney, and (iii) have made reasonable enquiries and have no knowledge of any spouse, partner or relative of the other person who intends to make an application for the appointment of a guardianship of property.

Thank you for reading and I hope my blogs added extra flavour to your favourite morning beverage. 

Rick Bickhram

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