Tag: solicitor

05 Jun

Who can compel the release of a lawyer’s file after death?

Stuart Clark Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The notes and records of the lawyer who assisted the deceased with their estate planning can play an important role in any estate litigation. As a result, it is not uncommon for a drafting lawyer to receive a request from individuals involved in estate litigation to provide them with a copy of their notes and files relating to the deceased’s estate planning. But can the lawyer comply with such a request?

The central concern involved for the lawyer is the duty of confidentiality which they owe to the deceased. This duty of confidentiality is codified by rule 3.3-1 of the Law Society of Ontario’s Rules of Professional Conduct, which provides:

“A lawyer at all times shall hold in strict confidence all information concerning the business and affairs of the client acquired in the course of the professional relationship and shall not divulge any such information unless expressly or impliedly authorized by the client or required by law to do so.

The duty of confidentiality and privilege which is owed to the deceased by the lawyer survives the deceased’s death. This was confirmed by the court in Hicks Estate v. Hicks, [1987] O.J. No. 1426, where, in citing the English authority of Bullivant v. A.G. Victoria, [1901] A.C. 196, it was confirmed that privilege and the duty of confidentiality survive death, and continues to be owed from the lawyer to the deceased. With respect to the question of who may waive privilege on behalf of the deceased following their death, Hicks Estate v. Hicks confirmed that such a power falls to the Estate Trustee under normal circumstances, stating:

“It is clear, therefore, that privilege reposes in the personal representative of the deceased client who in this case is the plaintiff, the administrator of the estate of Mildred Hicks. The plaintiff can waive the privilege and call for disclosure of any material that the client, if living, would have been entitled to from the two solicitors.”

Simply put, the Estate Trustee may step into the shoes of the deceased individual and compel the release of the lawyer’s file to the same extent that the deceased individual could have during their lifetime.

In circumstances in which the validity of the Will has been challenged, the authority of the Estate Trustee is also being challenged by implication, as their authority to act as Estate Trustee is derived from the Will itself. In such circumstances, the named Estate Trustee may arguably no longer waive privilege and/or the duty of confidentiality on behalf of the deceased individual. Should the notes and/or records of the drafting lawyer still be required, a court order is often required waiving privilege and/or the duty of confidentiality before they may be produced.

Whether or not a lawyer can release their file following the death of a client will depend on the nature of the dispute in which such a request is being made, and who is making the request. If there is a challenge to the validity of the Will or the Estate Trustee’s authority, it is likely that a court Order will be required before the lawyer may produce their file regardless of who is requesting the file. If the dispute does not question the Estate Trustee’s authority, such as an Application for support under Part V of the Succession Law Reform Act, the lawyer should comply with the request to release their file so long as the requesting party is the Estate Trustee. If the requesting party is not the Estate Trustee, and the Estate Trustee should refuse to provide the lawyer with their authorization to release the file, matters become more complicated, and may require a court Order before the lawyer may release their file.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

11 Aug

Hull on Estates #386 – Practices for Solicitor-Client meetings

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Listen to Hull on Estates #386 – Practices for Solicitor-Client meetings

Today on Hull on Estates, Andrea Buncic and Jordan Atin discuss prudent practices for Solicitor-Client meetings. If you have any questions, please email us at hull.lawyers@gmail.com or leave a comment on our blog page.

Click here for more information on Andrea Buncic.

Click here for more information on Jordan Atin.

24 Jun

Compensation for Work Done by Estate Trustees and Solicitors – Hull on Estates #116

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Listen to Compensation for work done by estate trustees and solicitors.

 

This week on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Diane Vieira discuss compensation for work done by estate trustees and estate solicitors.

 

Case citation:

Rooney Estate v. Stewart Estate 2007 WL3019262 (Ont. S.C.J.), 2007 CarswellOnt 650

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

05 Feb

Administration and the Role of the Solicitor and the Role of the Estate Trustee

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The recent case of Rooney Estate v. Stewart Estate (2007), CarswellOnt 6560 serves to highlight the “distinct but complimentary” roles of the Estate Trustee and the estate solicitor. There, the court noted the responsibilities of each.

The court held that the Estate Trustee is responsible for:

1.         arranging for the funeral and disposition of remains;

2.         locating the will and instructing the solicitor to apply for the appropriate grant of appointment;

3.         locating all the assets of the estate, including making arrangements to secure, preserve, and dispose of such assets in accordance with the terms of the will;

4.         advertising for creditors and paying all debts of the estate including the filing of appropriate tax returns;

5.         preparing a set of accounts for the approval of the beneficiaries or the court, as is required; and

6.         distributing the estate.

The court noted that, generally, the role of the solicitor is to apply for a certificate of appointment for the trustee and to attend upon a passing of accounts. The Estate Trustee is entitled to pay these legal expenses out of the Estate.

The Estate Trustee can claim compensation for carrying out his or her duties. That compensation may also include reimbursement for professional help. However, the Estate Trustee cannot claim compensation for services provided by others whose services are charged to the estate.

Problems can arise where the solicitor performs work that falls within the Estate Trustee’s responsibilities. While this is permissible, the court will ensure that the estate is not being doubly charged. Further, the court will not normally allow a solicitor to charge solicitor’s rates for trustee work.

In the decision, the court cautions that the “solicitor should not perform trustee’s work unless instructed to do so by the trustee. If such a request is made, the solicitor should advise the trustee that he will render an account to the trustee personally for doing her work. Generally, the estate is not liable to pay this account; rather, it falls to the trustee to pay out of her compensation.”

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

29 May

The Solicitor/Client Privilege and the Duty of Confidentiality – Hull on Estates Podcast #61

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Listen to "The Solicitor/Client Privilege and the Duty of Confidentiality"

Read the transcribed version of "The Solicitor/Client Privilege and the Duty of Confidentiality"

During Hull on Estates Episode #61, Ian Hull and Suzana Popovic-Montag discussed the solicitor and client privilege and the difference between this concept and the duty of confidentiality in the context of estate law and estate litigation.

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