Tag: RRSPs

17 Mar

New Wills Needed With Later-in-Life Marriages

Ian Hull Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

There are some important milestones in life when it is imperative for a person to update their will. A later-in-life second marriage certainly is one of them.

If your first marriage ended in divorce, the provisions in your will that refer to your spouse are automatically revoked, as provided by s. 17(2) of the Succession Law Reform Act. Your former spouse will no longer be your executor or trustee or even a beneficiary of your estate unless there is an explicit reference in your will to this.

Keep in mind the same is not true for beneficiary designations relating to assets, such as RRSPs, RRIFs, life insurance policies and pensions. Those will still flow to the individual named in those plans unless you take steps to name new beneficiaries.

If you are separated but not divorced, your will remains entirely valid upon death, in the absence of a separation agreement delineating a married spouse’s entitlement. Therefore, any bequests previously made by a spouse to a surviving spouse remain valid. This situation is not ideal either, since you want to avoid having assets flowing to a person when you are no longer involved with them.

A complicating factor with later-in-life marriages is that they can bring together children from previous relationships. From an estate-planning perspective, this can create complexities.

Perhaps the children from a first relationship resent a step-parent and feel that their step-siblings are now unfairly in line for the estate. Conversely, a step-parent may welcome a spouse’s child as their own or the couple may have a child of their own or adopt one. Where does that leave the other children from previous marriages from an estate distribution perspective?

Aside from the financial implications of having your family members squabble over your estate, there is an emotional component to consider. Children may feel slighted if they do not inherit what they consider to be their fair portion of the estate, even if the intention is that the surviving spouse, in turn, leaves assets to the children upon their death. This approach leaves room for uncertainty, which is the last thing you want to create when drawing up an estate plan.

A common practice for estate planning when it comes to second marriages is to provide a “life estate” to the surviving spouse and a “gift over” to the testator’s children. If the father were to die in this scenario, the matrimonial home and all of his money would be held in trust for his widow for life. She could then make use of these assets but would not have the right to gift them to beneficiaries of her own estate, as the assets would be given to his children upon her death.

Almost any blended-family situation creates tension that can explode into estate litigation if the will is not carefully drafted to address the family’s circumstances. It is important to be clear about your wishes with the lawyer revising your estate plan, taking into account how everyone in your blended family will react to the arrangement.

To sum up, it is crucial to seek the advice of legal counsel about wills before entering into a late-life marriage. Those that do will discover estate planning will be much different than with a first marriage when they had fewer assets and beneficiaries.

Thanks for reading … have a great day,

Ian Hull

15 Aug

Hull on Estates #343 – RRSP’s and Beneficiaries

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to: Hull on Estates Episode #343 – RRSP’s and Beneficiaries

Today on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Stuart Clark discuss the recent case of Kiperchuk v. The Queen, and whether an RRSP that passes to a designated beneficiary on death is available to CRA to satisfy the deceased’s tax debt.

If you have any questions, please email us at hull.lawyers@gmail.com or leave a comment on our blog page.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Stuart Clark.

 

13 Aug

Til Death Do Us Part – Spouses, RRSPs and Taxation

Hull & Hull LLP Litigation, RRSPs/Insurance Policies Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In Kiperchuk v. The Queen, 2013 TCC 60 (CanLII), the Tax Court of Canada held that a spouse who received RRSP benefits upon her spouse’s death was not liable to pay the deceased’s unpaid tax debt arising prior to his death.

There, deceased designated his wife as the beneficiary of his RRSP. The couple subsequently separated, and divorce proceedings were commenced. However, the designation remained in place. Prior to his death, the deceased incurred significant tax debts, which were unpaid as at the time of his death. His estate was insufficient to pay the tax debts. CRA sought to find the wife liable for the unpaid taxes. It relied on s. 160 of the Income Tax Act which, in effect, imposes joint liability for unpaid taxes (to a certain extent) where a tax payer transfers property to a spouse, child or “person with whom the person was not dealing at arm’s length” for less than fair market value. 

The Court refused to find the wife liable. Although it had no difficulty in finding that there was, in fact, a transfer, the transfer took place at the time of death. As of that date, the status of marriage ended due to death, and the wife was, therefore, no longer a spouse, and further, “nor was she a person with whom the transferor was not dealing at arm’s length at the time of the transfer”.

The Court may have been splitting hairs here. The transfer took effect on the moment of death, and as of that moment, according to the reasoning, the parties were no longer spouses: the husband “was not related to the appellant by marriage at the time she became entitled to the RRSP”. “The status of marriage is ended by death… .”

Further, the Court does not give much explanation as to why it considered the transfer to be at arm’s length. 

Finally, the limited application of the case should be noted. The case dealt only with tax liability arising before death: a beneficiary of an RRSP is liable for unpaid income tax on the RRSP proceeds where the estate is unable to pay: s. 160.2(1) of the Income Tax Act.

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

01 Jul

Dependant Relief and the Succession Law Reform Act – Hull on Estates #117

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Dependant Relief.

This week on Hull on Estates, Natalia Angelini and Craig Vander Zee discuss dependant relief and reference a variety of cases that utilized the Succession Law Reform Act.

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

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25 Mar

Applying for Probate

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Applying for Probate

This week on Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Ian and Suzana talk about the applying for probate. They discuss some of the ways that estate administrators can simplify the process.

Comments? Send us an email at hullandhull@gmail.com, post a comment on our blog at http://estatelaw.hullandhull.com/ or leave us a message on our comment line at 206-457-1985.

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