Tag: rights

28 Jan

MAID: Upcoming Developments

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, Ethical Issues, Health / Medical, In the News, Public Policy Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In many respects the law of Quebec differs from that of other provinces.  In terms of medical assistance in dying (MAID), however, a September 2019 decision of the Quebec Superior Court of Justice has the potential to spark change in legislation throughout the country.

In Truchon c Procureur général du Canada, 2019 QCCS 3792, the Court considered the constitutional validity of the requirement that the natural death of individuals accessing MAID be reasonably foreseeable.  The applicants had been declared ineligible for MAID on the basis that their deaths were not considered to be reasonably foreseeable.  The first applicant suffered from cerebral palsy and his condition had deteriorated significantly in 2012, when he became totally paralyzed, preventing him engaging in activities that he had previously enjoyed.  The second applicant suffered from paralysis and severe scoliosis, with a significant change in her health in 1992 when she was diagnosed with degenerative muscular post-polio syndrome.  Both applicants lived in constant pain with a poor prognosis of continued suffering and deterioration, but had been denied access to MAID on the basis that their natural deaths were not reasonably foreseeable and decided to seek the Court’s assistance.

The Court first reviewed the issue of whether the reasonably foreseeable natural death requirement violated the rights to life, liberty, and security of the person under Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.  While the restriction was noted to have the potential effect of prolonging the lives of some individuals who would otherwise request MAID, it was also considered to have the risk of encouraging some patients “to end things prematurely, and often in a degrading or violent manner, before being in mortal agony, or having completely lost their dignity or being in the final stage of life.”  Due to the exposure of some Canadians seeking MAID to (1) a higher risk of death and (2) physical and psychological pain, “depriv[ing] them of the opportunity to make a fundamental decision that respects their personal dignity and integrity”, the reasonably foreseeable death requirement was ruled to infringe the right to life, liberty, and security under Section 7 of the Charter.

Next, the Court considered whether the reasonably foreseeable natural death requirement violated the right to equality under Section 15 of the Charter.  The Court found the applicants were prevented from accessing MAID on the basis of the nature of their disabilities, which notwithstanding being “serious and incurable” did not render death reasonably foreseeable, and that as a result the first applicant in particular was “deprived of the exercise of these choices essential to his dignity as a human being due to his personal characteristics that the challenged provision does not consider. He can neither commit suicide by a method of his own choosing nor legally request this assistance.”

The infringement of the applicants’ fundamental rights under Sections 7 and 15 of the Charter was not considered to be justified by Section 1 and the Court, accordingly, declared these provisions of Quebec and Canadian MAID laws unconstitutional.  The declaration of constitutional invalidity of the reasonably foreseeable natural death requirement for accessing MAID was suspended for six months to provide an opportunity to address amendments to provincial and federal legislation.

Quebec has recently announced that it now intends to eliminate the parts of its MAID legislation that have been declared unconstitutional.  Prime Minister Trudeau has advised that the government will be updating federal legislation to reflect the Truchon decision prior to March 11, 2020, when the judgment will take effect.  Precisely how Canada and Ontario will amend the relevant provisions of MAID legislation has yet to be determined.

As yesterday’s blog mentioned, there has been recent scrutiny regarding the restrictive approach in respect of access to MAID and this decision out of Quebec and corresponding updates to the law may represent an important first step in the right direction in enhancing accessibility.

Thank you for reading,

Nick Esterbauer

17 Apr

Hull on Estates #328 – Rights of Spouses

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to: Hull on Estates #328 – Rights of Spouses

Today on Hull on Estates, Natalia Angelini and Moira Visoiu discuss the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in Carrigan v. Carrigan Estate.  A link to the case can be found here.   

If you have any questions, please e-mail us at hull.lawyers@gmail.com or leave a comment on our blog page.

Click here for more information on Natalia Angelini.

Click here for more information on Moira Visoiu. 

05 Jul

Common Law Partners’ Rights to Property

Hull & Hull LLP Common Law Spouses Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Yesterday’s blog considered the fact that a common law spouse has no beneficial entitlement to his or her deceased spouse’s estate on an intestacy.  There are, however, remedies available to the disappointed spouse. 

The first of these is a claim for dependant support found in Part V of the Succession Law Reform Act, whereby a common law spouse (or any other “dependant” of the deceased)  can ask for support where no adequate provision has been made for the dependant by the deceased.  

The Court has broad discretion to grant relief that, according to section 62(3) of the Act, can take a variety of forms, including the transfer, use or occupation of specified property in satisfaction of the dependant’s need for support.  

In many situations involving long-term common law relationships, there may also be an argument for equitable (as opposed to legal) ownership of property by the surviving common law spouse. These rights will be founded on the principles of unjust enrichment and include, for example, resulting or constructive trust, and proprietary estoppel.

The Supreme Court of Canada has recently considered two cases that provide guidance on unjust enrichment in the context of common law relationships. The Court released one decision in the matters of Kerr v. Baranow, and Vanasse v. Seguin, which I will be discussing in the next couple of blogs.    

Sharon Davis – Click here for more information on Sharon Davis

03 Nov

Advancing the rights of older adults and developing an anti-ageist approach to law

Hull & Hull LLP Elder Law, Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Law Commission of Ontario, the Canadian Centre for Elder Law and the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly hosted the 5th Canadian Conference on Elder Law on October 29 – 30, 2010. www.acelaw.ca

The stated goal of this year’s conference, which was held in Toronto, was to “promote contribution and access to a knowledge base regarding legal issues affecting older adults, with a view to reducing vulnerability, social isolation, and abuse” with the overarching theme of the conference being to develop an anti-ageist approach to the law.

The speakers touched on a wide range of topics, including aging, access to justice, the role of law schools in responding to Canada’s aging demographic, the challenges and opportunities of a shift to a rights-based approach to elder law and approaches to law reform that include older adults.

In light of the stated goal, several speakers opined that there should be direct consultation with stakeholders. Senior’s Activist, Bea Levis, for example, stressed that laws, policies and programs must be informed by the lived experiences of older adults if we wish them to be both fair and effective. I couldn’t agree more.

The Canadian Conference on Elder Law is one of the many ways that individuals from diverse backgrounds and professions are able to increase awareness regarding the issues facing older adults and develop strategies to advance the interests of this often vulnerable population.

If you are concerned about elder rights, there are several things you can do, one being to sign up for next year’s conference. I hope to see you there.

Thanks for reading!
 

Kathryn Pilkington – Click here for more information on Kathryn Pilkington.

12 Aug

The Golubchuk Case and the Health Care Consent Act – Hull on Estates #123

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Listen to the Health Care Consent Act.

This week on Hull on Estates, Megan Connolly and Sean Graham review the Golubchuk case out of Manitoba and discuss the Health Care Consent Act of Ontario.

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

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04 Mar

Trustees’ Rights to Indemnification

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Trustees’ Rights to Indemnification.

This week on Hull on Estates, Suzana and Ian celebrate the 100th episode of Hull on Estates with the first part of a two episode discussion on a trustee’s right to indemnification.

Comments? Send us and email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

04 Dec

Preparing for Trials in the Context of Contested Passing of Accounts – Hull on Estates #88

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Passing of Accounts, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Preparing for Trials in the Context of Contested Passing of Accounts

In this podcast, Craig Vander Zee and Paul Trudelle discuss trial preparation considerations in the context of a contested passing of accounts.

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