Tag: POA

12 Mar

How Important are Powers of Attorney?

Rebecca Rauws Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In Ontario, we are fortunate to have the ability to execute powers of attorney in respect of our property and our health care. I recently learned that Jersey, in the Channel Islands, has only lately gained the ability to execute a “Lasting Power of Attorney” to record their decisions and intentions in respect of their assets and care. On that note, I thought I would take the opportunity to provide a quick reminder of the importance of executing powers of attorney, and the possible consequences of not doing so.

Powers of attorney in Ontario are governed mainly by the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, S.O. 1992, c. 30 (the “SDA”). The SDA sets out, among other things, the requirements for powers of attorney, the requisite capacity to grant a power of attorney, and the powers and duties of attorneys. There are two types of powers of attorney: powers of attorney for personal care (dealing with your health, medical care, and other matters related to your well-being) and powers of attorney for property (dealing with your property and financial matters). Generally, powers of attorney will come into play if you become incapable of managing your property or personal care, respectively, but it is also possible to grant a power of attorney for property that is effective immediately (that is, not conditional upon later incapacity).

What Happens if I Don’t Execute Powers of Attorney?

If you do not execute powers of attorney, and you never lose capacity, you may never realize how important they are. However, as we have blogged about previously, as our population begins to live longer, there has been an increase in dementia and other aging-related conditions associated with cognitive decline, meaning that the use and activation of powers of attorney is increasing.

Taking the step of executing powers of attorney means that you have the chance to make your own decision regarding who will handle your affairs in the event that you are no longer capable. If you become incapable, and have not named an attorney for property or personal care, it is open (and may become necessary, depending on your circumstances) for an individual to bring an application seeking to be appointed as your guardian for property or personal care, thus allowing them to act as your substitute decision-maker. The application process requires that notice be given to certain people (including certain family members), and if someone disagrees with the appointment of the proposed guardian, they may contest the guardianship—but the key detail to remember is that the ability to make the decision is taken away from you.

A guardianship application can also be brought if a person has executed a power of attorney, but the existence of a power of attorney will be an important factor for the court’s consideration: pursuant to the SDA, if the court is satisfied that there is an alternative course of action that is less restrictive of the person’s decision-making rights, the court shall not appoint a guardian.

Naming someone to act on your behalf with respect to your property and personal care is a big decision. It is almost certain that you are in the best position to make a determination as to who you want acting for you in this regard. We should all take the opportunity to exercise our own decision-making rights, to choose the person that we want to play the important role of attorney, and not leave it up to others to make this decision for us.

Thanks for reading,

Rebecca Rauws

 

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30 Jul

Incapacity Planning Among Cancer Patients

Nick Esterbauer Capacity, Health / Medical, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The results of a recent study published in the American Medical Association Oncology Journal suggest that more patients with cancer are obtaining Continuing Powers of Attorney for Property than in the past.  Approximately 74% of Americans facing cancer have a Power of Attorney for Property in place.  However, while not considered statistically significant, the use of Powers of Attorney for Personal Care and frequency of discussion with respect to end-of-life preferences have actually become less prevalent in recent years, with rates of only 40% (down from 49% in 2000) and 60% (down from 68%), respectively.

Older studies have suggested that physicians should re-evaluate a patient’s mental capacity after significant changes in medication, infection, metabolic disturbances, or diagnosis with a new medical problem, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, which may contribute to changes to mental capacity.  While mental capacity is time and task-specific and will require analysis on a case-by-case basis, memory and concentration problems are frequently linked to certain chemotherapy regimens.  Some reports suggest that oncology patients may experience the same mental impairment that is often seen at increased rates within the aging population.  Further, the cognitive difficulty that is often referred to as “chemo fog” is believed to become more debilitating with the intensity of the chemotherapy.  Other cancer treatments, including radiation and surgery, are believed to be less likely to influence a patient’s mental capacity, but medications, such as narcotic painkillers, that may be used to address treatment side effects can nevertheless impact lucidity and the understanding of medical procedures to which the patient’s consent is required.  Further, when cancer originates or metastasizes within the brain, neurological functioning may be more likely to become compromised, whether temporarily or for the long term.

The presence of powers of attorney within the cancer community according to the study conducted by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine does not differ greatly from the estimate of 71% of Canadians that have Powers of Attorney in place.  Generally, it is a good idea to ensure that individuals of all ages take the time to consider an incapacity plan and to have Power of Attorney documents prepared.  However, cancer patients may be more likely than others to have to make important decisions between different treatment options.  In situations where diminished capacity may become a more likely scenario due to illness (or related treatment) or age, arrangements should be made to ensure that, if one becomes incapable of making important decisions him or herself, someone who can be trusted is authorized and prepared to do so on their behalf.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

08 Jun

POA Fraud

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

 As an aging society, we are likely to see an increase in issues surrounding abuse of our elderly. Just simply take a look at our recent estate and trust literature and you will notice that there has been an increase in articles about elder law. 


Recently, I read an article labeled “Putting the Brakes on POA Fraud.” This article can be found in Briefly Speaking which is the official magazine of the Ontario Bar Association. The article is authored by David Freedman, who is an associate professor at Queen’s University faculty of Law.  In his article, Professor Freedman looks at the common situation in which elder abuse is likely to occur wherein he states: “The prototypical example is the situation in which the elderly parent resides with one child who is to take principal responsibility for the parent’s care and who has been given a POA by the parent over his or her assets. Perhaps it is the siblings or a third-party care-giver who complains about the exercise or non-exercise of the POA, but there are many cases in which the assets are misappropriated.” Of course there is a strong public interest in protecting our elderly against financial exploitation, but what can we do?

For those of us who practice in this area of the law, how often have we heard of a family member approaching the police  to make a complaint about an elderly person who has been taken advantage of and being told “it’s a civil matter”? False. Section 331 of the Criminal Code of Canada addresses the issue of “Theft by a Person Holding a Power of Attorney.” In addition to the Criminal Code, there are civil remedies that are founded on the principles of restitution. Professor Freedman states that regardless of the type of case (criminal or civil) “the interest is the same, stripping the wrong-doer of any illicit gain and restoring the victim as much as it is possible to do in the circumstances.”

Thank you for reading,

Rick Bickhram

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