Tag: Planning

02 Aug

Aging in Place in Canada

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent survey commissioned by HomeEquity Bank suggests that the majority of older Canadians plan on staying in their homes as they age (otherwise known as aging in place) rather than downsizing and/or moving into assisted living or retirement communities.  93% of survey respondents aged 65 or older felt that it was important that they remain at their current home throughout retirement.  69% of them advised that their primary reason for wishing to remain at home was to maintain independence as they age.

The older respondents (75 years or older) advised that it was important to them that they remain in their current home to stay close to family, friends, and/or the community (51%) and that emotional attachment and memories were also contributing factors (40%).

In order to remain living at home as long as possible into retirement, advance planning in terms of finances and logistics may be necessary.  A recent article appearing in Forbes suggests that the following steps, unrelated to financial planning, may be especially useful in facilitating successful aging in place:

  • Maintaining social connections to avoid social isolation;
  • Identifying who will help, whether family members, friends, or public services;
  • Planning for the transition as needs change over time and identifying the resources and services available in the community;
  • Preparing the home to accommodate increased needs (for example, by installing grab bars and a chair in the shower);
  • Reviewing and updating the plan to age in place as may be necessary (due to a change in health, available support, or financial constraints).

Notwithstanding one’s plans to continue living at the family home, increasing longevity, a lack of liquidity, unrealistic expectations in terms of income sources after retirement, and the high cost (or local inaccessibility) of caregiving services may contribute to a decision to sell the home and relocate earlier than intended.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

28 Dec

Estate Planning over the Holidays

Noah Weisberg Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, General Interest, New Years Resolutions Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The holiday season is upon us, and with it comes family gatherings, buying and wrapping gifts, and travel.  Suffice to say, it can be a hectic and busy time.  Nonetheless, with 2018 on the horizon, many of us take the time to reflect and set resolutions for the upcoming year.  Despite this, so many Canadians do not have a Will.

Why not?  Estate planning need not be trying, and the holiday season is a perfect time to start considering your estate plan.

With this in mind, I thought I would highlight an article from the Globe and Mail which does a great job of highlighting issues to get you thinking about your estate plan:

  1. Get started – make a detailed list of your assets, liabilities, and joint assets, and think about your family’s needs and lifestyle.
  2. Consider your options – do you want your bequests to be absolute, subject to the terms of a trust, or gifted during your lifetime?
  3. Appoint representatives – think about who you trust to administer your estate and ensure that they are up for the job.
  4. Special circumstances – are there any beneficiaries who have special circumstances such as those receiving ODSP, that would benefit from specific trusts?
  5. Taxation – meet with a professional to understand tax consequences and the vehicles available to limit the payment of taxes, including the use of joint ownership and estate freezes.
  6. Cottages – should your estate involve the cherished family cottage, think about whether you want it sold, or shared amongst family members. If the latter, think about preparing a co-ownership agreement.

Wishing all of our readers a happy New Year!

Noah Weisberg

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11 Aug

The Chambers Global Private Wealth Guide

Nick Esterbauer Charities, Common Law Spouses, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, News & Events, Pension Benefits, Power of Attorney, RRSPs/Insurance Policies, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this year, Ian M. Hull, Suzana Popovic-Montag and I contributed the law and practice content for the Canada chapter to the Chambers and Partners 2017 Global Private Wealth Guide.

The Global Private Wealth Guide includes a chapter for nineteen different countries and features practical information regarding tax issues, succession law, the status of trusts, business and charitable planning, and the role of fiduciaries in each jurisdiction.  The Guide also features a profile page for each country, in which general information related to relevant business practices is summarized.

The Private Wealth Guide is a helpful tool for lawyers assisting clients who may hold property or business interests in multiple jurisdictions.  Among the interesting features of the website for the Guide is the option of comparing the treatment of each issue between two or more jurisdictions.  For example, it offers the opportunity to obtain quick and reliable information regarding any differences between the treatment of marital property in Canada and the United States.

A complete electronic copy of the guide is available here.  A link has also recently been added to the resources section of our website.

Thank you for reading and have a great weekend.

Nick Esterbauer

12 Apr

Hull on Estates #462 – Reducing Probate Fees

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, Natalia Angelini and Lisa Haseley discuss estate planning techniques for reducing probate fees and the pitfalls.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Natalia Angelini.

29 Feb

End-of-life Planning and Communicating Treatment Wishes

Ian Hull Health / Medical, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

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Estate planning and planning for the future are sometimes difficult tasks, particularly when it comes to end-of-life planning. When forced to confront their own mortality, many people are hesitant to dive in and make a plan. Unfortunately, this may result in their wishes being unknown if an emergency situation arises.

In Ontario, when a person is incapable of making their own decisions with respect to their care, the Health Care Consent Act (the “HCCA”) and the Substitute Decisions Act (the “SDA”) allow others to make decisions on the incapable person’s behalf. Section 20 of the HCCA sets out a list of persons who may give or refuse consent to treatment on behalf of someone who is incapable to give their own consent at the time. The list of people who may make decisions is as follows:

  1. The incapable person’s guardian of the person, if the guardian has authority to give or refuse consent to the treatment.
  2. The incapable person’s attorney for personal care, if the power of attorney confers authority to give or refuse consent to the treatment.
  3. The incapable person’s representative appointed by the Board under section 33, if the representative has authority to give or refuse consent to the treatment.
  4. The incapable person’s spouse or partner.
  5. A child or parent of the incapable person, or a children’s aid society or other person who is lawfully entitled to give or refuse consent to the treatment in the place of the parent. This paragraph does not include a parent who has only a right of access. If a children’s aid society or other person is lawfully entitled to give or refuse consent to the treatment in the place of the parent, this paragraph does not include the parent.
  6. A parent of the incapable person who has only a right of access.
  7. A brother or sister of the incapable person.
  8. Any other relative of the incapable person.

A person included in this list may give or refuse consent only if no person described in an earlier paragraph is willing or available to do so. The SDA, in turn, deals with Powers of Attorney and Guardians.

If you have not taken the time to think through your wishes with respect to treatment and communicate them to others, it is difficult to know whether your substitute decision maker under the HCCA or SDA will make the choice that you would have made yourself, had you been capable. One way of dealing with this issue is by clearly expressing your wishes, such as with a “living will”. The Ministry of the Attorney General describes a “living will” as an expression that is “sometimes used to refer to a document in which you write down what you want to happen if you become ill and can’t communicate your wishes about treatment…[t]he term ‘advance directive’ is also frequently used to refer to such a document.” The Ministry of the Attorney General also notes that you can include your treatment wishes in a Power of Attorney document to ensure that your attorney is aware of them.

Pursuant to the SDA s. 66(3), guardians of the person and attorneys for personal care have a duty to make decisions on an incapable person’s behalf in accordance with the incapable person’s wishes, if known. The guardian or attorney must also use reasonable diligence to ascertain whether the incapable has set out such wishes. Accordingly, it is important to consider including your wishes in your Power of Attorney for personal care and communicating them to your attorney, to ensure that your wishes are known.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

28 Dec

Preparing for a Decline in your Financial Cognitive Ability

Ian Hull Capacity, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently tweeted an article from the Wall Street Journal entitled Five Steps to Prepare for a Decline in Your Financial Cognitive Ability. The article points out that, although we easily consult health-care providers with respect to our physical health, we may have more difficulty recognizing our limitations and changes in our financial health. As we live longer lives, the likelihood of mental and cognitive decline increases, and accordingly, the need for a plan with respect to how to cope with such a decline increases as well.

During the holidays, many of us host and attend family gatherings, which may provide a good opportunity to discuss your plans and wishes with your loved ones, at a time when everyone is together in a relaxed, low-pressure environment. While such conversations are not always easy, they are a necessity to ensure that your wishes will be carried out, and that your family will not be stressed in attempting to discern exactly what your wishes are.

The first of the five steps suggested in the article is to talk to your spouse to ensure that both parties are in agreement with respect to your financial plan. The second suggestion is to organize your finances as clearly and simply as possible. If your finances are spread out over several banks or institutions, consider consolidating accounts. At the very least, it may be wise to create an inventory of all accounts, investments, and assets so everything can be easily located and accounted for.

The next step is to review your Will and your Power of Attorney for Property, or if you do not yet have either of these documents, arrange to have them prepared by a lawyer. With respect to your Will, ensure that you have clearly thought out your choice of executor, the bequests to beneficiaries, and anyone you may be leaving out. With respect to your Power of Attorney, of course, the most vital element is that you choose a trustworthy Attorney.

The fourth suggestion is to assign roles to your family members. This involves asking the individual if they would be willing to assume the role you have selected, and communicating within your family with respect to who will be responsible for which tasks. By having this conversation in advance, and explaining the reason for your choices, you may be able to avoid any surprised or hurt feelings at a later date, based on who has, or has not, been selected for a particular role.

The last suggestion included in the article is to seek professional assistance and advice from a lawyer and/or a financial professional. They can help you feel comfortable with the planning you have put in place and give you, and your family, peace of mind.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

10 Aug

Is Long Term Care Insurance Something You Should be Thinking About?

Ian Hull Elder Law Insurance Issues Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week, Suzana’s blog post discussed longevity planning and Powers of Attorney for Personal Care (POA PC). She mentioned that, while financial and estate plans tend to focus on assets, a longevity plan or a POA PC is important in order to address other issues such as quality of life planning and health care instructions. Long-term care insurance is one instance where these plans overlap.

As life expectancy increases, planning for retirement becomes more important. The possibility that you may have health care or long-term care expenses later in life is becoming increasingly likely. Long-term care could include in-home care or moving into a long-term care facility, both of which come with high costs.

As one article, Do you need long-term care insurance?, posted on MoneySense.ca points out, long-term care insurance is more common in the U.S. than in Canada. However, although some costs for long-term care may be publicly funded in Canada, most such expenses will need to be paid for by the individual. Thus, there are several options to choose from when considering how to fund long-term care:

  • Save for retirement in amounts sufficient to cover any expenses which may arise;
  • Rely on your children or other family members to contribute financially; or
  • Purchase long-term care insurance

To illustrate the importance of thinking about how to fund possible long-term care, consider the example of a couple, one of whom becomes ill and requires long-term care in a facility. After funding this care, the other partner may be left with very few financial resources to pay for their own retirement or long-term care costs further down the road.

However, if you wait too long to purchase long-term care insurance, the premiums may be more expensive than you would like and could turn insurance into a non-viable option. This leads us back to the importance of planning. Whether you decide to purchase insurance, or save to cover any eventual expenses yourself, it is vital to plan ahead and keep in mind that the amount you may require during retirement may be greater than you expect, especially if you or your partner end up requiring care later in life.

Thank you for reading.

Ian Hull

16 Mar

Didn’t Get the Memo?

Hull & Hull LLP Estate Planning, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Wills often deal with personal property by referring to a memorandum that sets out how the personal property is to be distributed. Usually, the memorandum is not executed in accordance with the requirements of the Succession Law Reform Act, or similar legislation. How effective is such a memo?

A memorandum, even if not properly executed, will be “incorporated by reference” and found to part of a valid will if:

a. the memorandum is referred to in a duly executed testamentary instrument;

b. the memorandum is in existence at the time of the execution of the testamentary instrument; and

c. the memorandum is “ascertainable” – that is, there is specific reference to a specific document. The reference to the document must make it identifiable: see Black Estate v. Black, 2006 CarswellOnt 9030, 32 E.T.R. (3d) 282 at para. 19.

Reference in the will to a document that is to be created in the future can be fatal to the application of incorporation by reference. However, reference to a memorandum that does not exist at the time the will was executed, but exists at a time when a codicil confirming the will is executed may result in a valid incorporation by reference: See Re Lady Truro (1866), L.R. 1 P.& D. 201, referred to in Hull, Probate Practice, 4th ed, p. 83.

Thanks for reading,

Paul Trudelle – Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle

28 Mar

PLANNING ON WHAT TO DO WITH AN INHERITANCE IS IMPORTANT

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Within the next twenty years, Canada’s baby boomers are in line to inherit a substantial fortune, which will represent the largest transfer of wealth from one generation to the next.

In an article written by Jennifer Power Scott and published in Canadian Living, Ms. Scott discusses the  bittersweet bonanza that many heirs face and cautions the impulsive spender: "There are a lot of people in this world who might go out and blow the whole thing in a week, and that’s not appropriate. Unless you’re well-heeled to begin with, flushing the funds into trips to Las Vegas, sexy cars and plush home theatres probably isn’t the smart way to go."

In her article, Ms. Scott stresses the importance of carefully planning what to do with your inheritance, so that your inheritance can turn into a gift that lasts. Ms. Scott urges those who have received a windfall inheritance to:

  1. Take a breath. Put your inheritance somewhere safe that earns a good guaranteed rate of interest for a few months while you think things through
  2. Once you are ready to make a decision, speak to a certified financial planner
  3. Consider your option, such as satisfying outstanding debts, investing into an RESP for your children, or an RRSP or RRIF for yourself

Essentially Ms. Scott’s article forces her readers to consider their long-term goals as opposed to their short-term goals. "It pays to step back a little bit. Some people will immediately say, I’ve got this money, I don’t deserve it all, and maybe I should start helping out my kids right away. But they need to make sure that their financial future is properly secured before they do that."

Thank you for reading, and have a great day,

Rick Bickhram – Click here for more information on Rick Bickhram.

22 Nov

Encouraging Your Parents to Discuss Their Financial Matters

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Having an open conversation with your parents about their financial matters and the importance of estate planning is never an easy task. Medical studies have indicated that people who have lived through the Great Depression prefer to keep their financial affairs to themselves. This presents a challenging task for loved ones trying to discuss with their parents financial matters and particularly who is best equipped to handle their finances if they are unable or how they expect to pay for long-term care should the need arise.

The New York Times recently published an article entitled, “Talking with Depression-Era Parents About Money”. In this article, Tara Siegel Bernard, the author, suggests the different ways that adult children could broach the topic with their parents such as:

Show and Tell: “Adult children could talk about their own estate plans – a show and tell”. This forces the parent to give thought to their children’s estate plan and opens the door for the child to ask how the parents have handled their own affairs.

Parental Duty: “Appeal to their duties as parents.” 

Bring in a Pro: “Some parents may also feel more comfortable discussing their financial situation in front of a disinterested party, like a long time accountant, lawyer, or financial planner.” It appears that Ms. Bernard suggests having a disinterested party present could help the parent feel more secure, which likely would have the effect of the parent opening up about their financial matters. This sounds like a good idea; however, a word of caution, this suggestion also could lead to estate litigation, as arguments of undue influence could be advanced in the circumstances.

Timing: “Make sure you choose a good time and place to bring up the topic”. Obviously, having this sort of discussion at the family holiday party is not a good idea.  

Thank you for reading and have a good day.

Rick Bickhram – Click here for more information on Rick Bickhram.

 

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