Tag: Notice of Objection

21 Jul

You were left out of the will – what are your options?

Ian Hull Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

When parents are creating their Last Will and Testament, they often direct that assets are to be divided amongst their children. However, this is not always how it works, as the testator has the right to leave their estate to whomever they want unless they have dependents who must be financially taken care of.

Indeed, some very rich celebrities – Sting, Elton John, Mark Zuckerberg, Warren Buffet and others – reportedly have said that their children will not receive the bulk of their estates. Their reasons include giving them “some semblance of normality, some respect for money, some respect for work” and “huge sums of wealth … distorts anything they might do in creating their own path.”

You may not have multimillionaires as parents, but there is the chance that when they die, you will not be named as a beneficiary in the will. If that happens and you feel you are entitled to some portion of the estate, a legal challenge to the will can be mounted. But beware – the process will be difficult and the chances of success uncertain.

The first thing to keep in mind is that only a spouse or dependent children can contest a will that has disinherited them. You have to have a financial interest in the estate and must be able to show you were named in a prior will, or that the deceased had promised to take care of you after their passing.

If probate has not already been granted, you can file a Notice of Objection with the court registrar. If probate has been granted, then you have to bring a motion for the return of the certificate of appointment.

Before doing that, it is wise to discuss with legal counsel why you are objecting to the will. If your reasons are based on emotion rather than reason, you will likely be advised to walk away and accept the situation. The court has little tolerance for notices of objections based on frivolous claims, and you may end up having to pay the legal costs the estate incurred in defending against your claim.

You also have to consider if contesting the will makes financial sense. Does the potential gain outweigh the legal costs (not to mention the time, effort and emotional stress) the process may cause?

That being said, there are valid reasons for taking legal action. The two main ones are that there was a lack of testamentary capacity when the final Will and Testament was drawn up, or that the testator was subject to undue influence by someone. Other valid reasons for mounting these challenges include:

  • the will is unsigned or not properly witnessed
  • the testator was not aware of the full contents of their estate
  • there are ambiguous terms in the will that are open to interpretation
  • simple fraud is alleged

Any of these reasons are grounds for filing a Notice of Objection. If successful, the will may be declared invalid.

Cases that come before the court include instances where a person near the end of their life leaves their estate to a much younger person who was their caregiver or romantic partner. Family members who find themselves cut out of the inheritance have to prove that the new beneficiary exerted undue influence in the writing of the will.

That is difficult, as mental capacity is a fluid concept. A person may have the capacity to enter into a marriage, but be incapable of effectively managing their own financial affairs. As the population ages, with many people holding onto sizeable financial portfolios, we will likely see more of these predatory marriages in the future.

Challenging a will in court can be a costly, time-consuming and emotionally draining experience. Litigation can pit family members against each other, straining relationships in a time when they should be mourning. Even if they win, beneficiaries may have to wait for years as the legal process unfolds.

If you feel you have been unfairly denied an inheritance, you should speak to a wills and estates lawyer. While every case is fact-dependent, they can provide you with an informed opinion about your chances of success.

Thanks for reading, and have a great day.

Ian Hull

09 Feb

Re Crowley Estate – What happens when you miss a deadline for a Notice of Objection?

Stuart Clark Estate Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Re Crowley Estate, 2021 ONSC 582, raises an interesting question surrounding the potential impact of counsel missing a procedural deadline in association with a Notice of Objection to the issuance of a  Certificate of Appointment (i.e. probate), and whether missing such a deadline is fatal to the Objector’s ability to generally proceed with a challenge to the Will.

The Notice of Objection process is governed by rule 75.03 of the Rules of Civil Procedure. It generally provides that at any time before the issuance of a Certificate of Appointment any individual who appears to have a financial in the estate may file a “Notice of Objection” to the issuance of a Certificate of Appointment. The impact of filing of the Certificate of Appointment is to in effect to pause the probate process, with the applicant Estate Trustee being required to vacate and/or deal with the Notice of Objection before probate can be issued. The process by which the Notice of Objection is generally dealt with is that upon being advised of the Notice of Objection the Estate Trustee is to serve a “Notice to Objector” upon the Objector in accordance with rule 75.03(4), which then provides the Objector with 20 days from the date on which they are served with the Notice to Objector to serve and file a “Notice of Appearance”. If the Notice of Appearance is served by the deadline, the matter proceeds to a motion for directions in accordance with rule 75.03(6), where the court would be asked to provide directions regarding how the objections that were raised are to be adjudicated before the court. If no “Notice of Appearance” is filed by the deadline the Notice of Objection is automatically vacated, and the probate application may proceed as if no Notice of Objection had been filed.

In Re Crowley Estate, the Objector filed a Notice of Objection to the issuance of probate, and was in turn served with a Notice to Objector by the Applicant. The date on which the Objector was served with the Notice to Objector was November 20, 2020, which would have resulted in a deadline of December 10, 2020 for the Objector to serve the Notice of Appearance. The Notice of Appearance was not served however by the Objector until December 15, 2020. The matter was directed by the Registrar to a Judge, who in turn asked the parties to make written submissions regarding the matter. The Applicant’s lawyer took the position that rule 75.03 was “unforgiving” with respect to its deadlines, and that as the Objector had missed the deadline to serve the Notice of Appearance the court was now required to proceed with the probate application as if no Notice of Objection had been filed. Objector’s counsel advised that the reason for the missed deadline was due to health related concerns surrounding COVID-19, appearing to note in any event that even if the Notice of Objection was vacated the Objector would be proceeding with a challenge to the validity of the Will, noting that the Objector had subsequently commenced a separate Application to address the concerns surrounding the validity of the Will on January 7, 2021.

The court ultimately extended the deadline for the Objector to file the Notice of Appearance under rule 3.02, which allows the court to extend any time prescribed by the rules on such terms as are just. In extending the deadline, Justice Boswell notes that the Objector clearly always intended to pursue the objection, and that there is no clear prejudice to allowing the extension. Perhaps interestingly however, although the comment does not appear to have played a decisive role in the final ruling, Justice Boswell references that even if the Certificate of Appointment was issued the Objector would likely have been at liberty to seek the return the Certificate of Appointment under rule 75.05, appearing to give credence to the Objector’s position that they would have been at liberty to proceed with their challenge to the validity of the Will regardless of the missed deadline for the Notice of Objection.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

27 Aug

Notice of Objection: Now What?

Kira Domratchev Estate Litigation, Executors and Trustees, Litigation Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

A testator appointed you as Estate Trustee of an Estate and a beneficiary filed a Notice of Objection to your appointment. What to do?

Typically, a Notice of Objection to an appointment of an Estate Trustee means that their authority is challenged such that before the administration of the Estate can be addressed, the Notice of Objection must be resolved, first and foremost.

Whereas in the case of a Notice of Objection, the party having filed it, is likely to commence a court proceeding to substantiate his or her claims, that is not always the case. As such, there are a couple of things that an Estate Trustee can do to force the Objector to move forward, in order to ultimately address the resolution of the objection.

  1. File a Notice to Objector

In accordance with Rule 75.03(4), an Estate Trustee can serve a Notice to Objector and file it with proof of service with the Court.

If the Objector does not serve and file a Notice of Appearance within 20 days of being served with a Notice to Objector, the Estate Trustee’s Application for a Certificate of Appointment is to proceed as if the Notice of Objection had not been filed.

If a Notice of Appearance is served on the Estate Trustee, they have 30 days to bring a motion for directions before the Court and if they do not do so, the Objector may seek directions, as well.

Essentially, the effect of a Notice to Objector is forcing the Objector to commence a claim or else abandon his or her objections.

  1. Commence an Application or Motion to propound the testator’s Will

Another option that exists for an Estate Trustee is simply skipping the steps that would follow the service of a Notice to Objector and seeking the directions of the Court, in accordance with Rules 14.05 and 75.06 of the Rules of Civil Procedure.

In this case, the Estate Trustee becomes the party commencing a court proceeding such that the costs associated with such a step ought to be considered, before proceeding. It is important to note, however, that proceeding with the first option will not necessarily save on legal costs to be incurred, if the Objector ultimately proceeds with a claim.

The option that is selected by an Estate Trustee will depend on the circumstances of each individual case such that it is important to consult with a lawyer as to which option is best.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this post interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Another Will Challenge Threshold Case

Challenging Challenges

Requests for Notice of Commencement of Proceeding

04 Aug

Hull on Estates #595 – When to Strike: Rule 25.11 and Notices of Objection

76admin Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Show Notes, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, Noah Weisberg and Sydney Osmar discuss Notices of Objection, Rule 25.11, and the court’s decision in Dessisa and Wolde v Demisie.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Noah Weisberg.

Click here for more information on Sydney Osmar.

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