Tag: negligence

09 Apr

Refusing to Answer: Questions About Duty of Lawyer

Paul Emile Trudelle Litigation Tags: , , 0 Comments

A lawyer was sued for negligence in allegedly failing to ensure that a will was not procured by undue influence or as a result of the testator’s lack of testamentary capacity. On examination for discovery, the lawyer was asked to advise as to texts or other secondary sources that the lawyer regarded as authoritative regarding the drafting of wills, and to advise as to whether the lawyer was aware of any cases (primary sources) that indicated that the lawyer was not required to document evidence of testamentary capacity.

The lawyer refused to answer those questions. The plaintiff brought a motion to compel the lawyer to answer. Must the lawyer answer those questions?

In Marshall v. Jackson, the motions master ordered the lawyer to answer the questions. On appeal, reported at  2021 ONSC 2361, the court held that the questions need not be answered.

The appeal judge held that it was trite law that a party cannot function as his or her own expert. By ordering the questions to be answered, the master in effect required a fact witness to research and deliver a legal opinion, which was contrary to a first principle of the law of evidence. Citing the Supreme Court of Canada, the appeal judge stated that “it is for the [trier of fact] to form opinions, and draw inferences and conclusions, and not for the witness”. The questions, it was held, went beyond asking the defendant for his or her general understanding of the steps he or she should have taken to ascertain testamentary capacity, but required that the lawyer research primary and secondary sources of law in an effort to provide support for legal reasoning going to the standard of care.

A third question was also refused: whether the defendant “understood that he was obliged to ensure that all available means were utilized to ascertain testamentary capacity”.  The defendant submitted that the question was too broad to be answerable. Would “all available means” include hiring a team of psychiatrists to evaluate the testator’s capacity? The appeal judge held that while the defendant’s counsel may have a point, the fact that the question was excessively broad did not make it unanswerable. “Indeed, the very absurdity of the literal meaning of the question makes it an easy one to answer.” Presumably, the answer will be “No”.

Next question, counsel?

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

16 Aug

When Might a Solicitor be Negligent in Preparing a Will?

Hull & Hull LLP Capacity, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Solicitors preparing Wills need to be mindful of the obligations they owe to a testator.  The seminal Court of Appeal decision in Hall v Bennett Estate provides a helpful refresher of the steps a solicitor should consider to ensure best practices are followed.

According to the Court, it is well established that a “solicitor who undertakes to prepare a will has the duty to use reasonable skill, care and competence in carrying out the testator’s intentions. This duty includes the obligation to inquire into and substantiate the testator’s capacity to make a will”.

Testing for capacity is fundamental – a solicitor has a duty to make inquiries into the testamentary capacity of the testator.

Should the solicitor have any doubt as to capacity, Justice Cullity in Scott v Cousins, famously states that “…careful solicitors who are in doubt on the question of capacity, will not play God – or even judge – and will supervise the execution of the will while taking, and retaining, comprehensive notes of their observations on the question”.

The Court of Appeal proceeds to summarize an article written by M.M. Litman & G.B. Robertson outlining errors made by solicitors in the preparation of a Will, leading to negligence claims,  including failing to:

  • obtain a mental status examination;
  • interview the testator in sufficient depth;
  • properly record or maintain notes; and
  • test for capacity.

As such, notes from a drafting solicitor should ensure that all of these are addressed.

In certain instances, although narrow, a duty of care might also be owed to a disappointed beneficiary.  A two part test is applied as set out by the Supreme Court of Canada in Cooper v. Hobart.

While claims for negligence by testators and disappointed beneficiaries cannot be stopped, a file with detailed notes can go a long way in defending such a claim.

Noah Weisberg

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05 Jan

Simple mistakes are sometimes the hardest to avoid.

David Freedman Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, General Interest Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

As a professional, one is never pleased to hear of a colleague being found liable in negligence. However, there are always lessons to be learned.

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Ozerdinc Family Trust v. Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP is unfortunately an example of a case where, apparently, a simple failure to account for the deemed disposition date of trust assets resulted in an avoidable tax liability. While the defendant solicitors admitted acting below the standard of care in failing to inform the plaintiffs respecting the date and consequences of the deemed disposition of the capital assets of the trust, liability was resisted on the theory that the mistake didn’t cause the loss as the plaintiffs/trustees had retained accountants who, the plaintiffs pleaded, should have been tracking and reporting on the deemed disposition date. The point was determined in a motion for summary judgment which was decided in favour of the plaintiffs; the mistake was sufficiently causative on its own.

What can one learn? It seems reasonable that the culprit here is faulty communication given that the firm and lawyers involved were of adequate experience and expertise to meet the applicable standard of care. As LawPro reminds us, mistakes are easy to make and standardized reporting systems help to avoid such errors.

David

Other articles you might enjoy:

Reliance of an Estate Trustee upon counsel: Is reliance always reasonable?

The Interpretation of Releases

Costs Sanctions and other Lessons

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