Tag: medical

24 Oct

Scents and Sensibility

Paul Emile Trudelle Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Do you smell that? Good!

The sense of smell, or lack of it, can be an indicator of the future onset of dementia.

In a study of 3,000 adults, researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center found that those who could not identify four out of five common odours were twice as likely to develop dementia within five years.

The study, “Olfactory Dysfunction Predicts Subsequent Dementia in Older US Adults”, was published in September 2017 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The scents used, in increasing difficulty of recognition, were peppermint, fish, orange, rose and leather. The study found that 78.1% of those studied had a normal sense of smell, and could identify four out of the five scents. 18.7% could identify only three of the scents, and 3.2% could only identify one or two of the scents.

After five years, almost all of those who could only identify one or less scents were diagnosed with dementia.

According to the study, the sense of smell may signal a key mechanism that also underlies human cognition. The olfactory system has stem cells which regenerate, and “a decrease in the brain’s ability to smell may signal a decrease in the brain’s ability to rebuild key components that are declining with age, leading to the pathological changes of many different dementias.”

Other studies, including a Canadian study, appear to support this conclusion.

Because the smell test is so easy to administer, it is believed that the test could lead to an earlier determination of the possible onset of dementia.

 

Smell you later.

Paul Trudelle

27 Jun

Your health – don’t let your financial guard down

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Health / Medical, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

We’re lucky in Canada – our healthcare system pays for doctor bills and hospital visits, and many employer-sponsored benefit plans provide for supplementary health insurance. Even better, universal care is actually expanding in places, such as the recent introduction of free pharmacare for those age 24 and under in Ontario.

But don’t get lulled – there are costs to healthcare. With our comprehensive public coverage, it can be easy to think that your costs will be covered if you were in an accident or experienced a serious illness. But many of us simply aren’t aware of what won’t be covered. For example, out-of-pocket costs could include loss of income (especially if you are self-employed), expensive uninsured prescription drugs and medical supplies, childcare during recovery, or even home renovations to accommodate the illness. And psychological therapy fees represent another potential cost, as mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability in Canada.

So, what can you do to ensure that you are financially prepared for a sudden, serious bad health event? Here are three options to consider:

  • An emergency fund/line of credit: You may need access to cash quickly if a health emergency arises and having a “rainy day fund” for unplanned or unexpected expenses is ideal for that purpose. A line of credit also serves this purpose, although it involves taking on debt and all the costs that that entails.
  • Disability insurance coverage to replace income: Disability insurance replaces a portion of your income if you are unable to work due to an illness or disability. Disability policies vary widely, so even if you have coverage at work, it’s worth checking whether additional personal coverage could be beneficial.
  • Critical illness insurance to cover other costs: This insurance provides a tax-free lump sum benefit upon the diagnosis of a serious illness, such as cancer, heart attack, stroke, blindness, paralysis, kidney failure and multiple sclerosis. Unlike disability insurance, the payment is not linked to your inability to return to work, and you have complete freedom to use the money any way that you wish, including paying for treatment outside of Canada that may not be covered by provincial healthcare.

Of course, rule number one is to stay healthy. But in the event you don’t, be prepared financially. A little planning can go a long way.

Thank you for reading … Have a great day,
Suzana Popovic-Montag

 

06 Jul

Billing Physician Assisted Deaths

Doreen So Ethical Issues, General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News, News & Events Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I have blogged about assisted suicide in the past with reference to the Canadian television show Mary Kills People.  The availability of assisted suicide continues to be a subject of public interest as each province deals with the implementation of the outcome of Supreme Court of Canada decision in Carter v. Canada (Attorney General).

As reported by The Globe and Mail, one particular doctor has removed himself from a roster of doctors who will administer assisted deaths because of changes to the physician fee schedule in British Columbia.  Notwithstanding his support for assisted death, Dr. Jesse Pewarchuk of Vancouver Island wrote a letter to his colleagues to explain that the new fee schedule made “medical assistance in dying” economically untenable for his practice.

According to Kelly Grant of the Globe and Mail,

“Under the new fee schedule, B.C. physicians will now be paid $40 for every 15 minutes, up to a maximum of 90 minutes, to conduct the first of two eligibility assessments required by law. Each of the assessments has to be provided by a different clinician. That works out to $240, a significant increase from the $100.25 interim assessment fee that has been in place in B.C. since shortly after assisted death became legal.

For second assessments, the time is capped at 75 minutes.

In the case of providing an assisted death, the province has set a flat fee of $200, plus a home-visit fee of $113.15.”

Within the same article, it was reported that Ontario does not have specific billing codes for this type of medical service at this present time.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for reading.

Doreen So

30 Jul

Incapacity Planning Among Cancer Patients

Nick Esterbauer Capacity, Health / Medical, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The results of a recent study published in the American Medical Association Oncology Journal suggest that more patients with cancer are obtaining Continuing Powers of Attorney for Property than in the past.  Approximately 74% of Americans facing cancer have a Power of Attorney for Property in place.  However, while not considered statistically significant, the use of Powers of Attorney for Personal Care and frequency of discussion with respect to end-of-life preferences have actually become less prevalent in recent years, with rates of only 40% (down from 49% in 2000) and 60% (down from 68%), respectively.

Older studies have suggested that physicians should re-evaluate a patient’s mental capacity after significant changes in medication, infection, metabolic disturbances, or diagnosis with a new medical problem, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, which may contribute to changes to mental capacity.  While mental capacity is time and task-specific and will require analysis on a case-by-case basis, memory and concentration problems are frequently linked to certain chemotherapy regimens.  Some reports suggest that oncology patients may experience the same mental impairment that is often seen at increased rates within the aging population.  Further, the cognitive difficulty that is often referred to as “chemo fog” is believed to become more debilitating with the intensity of the chemotherapy.  Other cancer treatments, including radiation and surgery, are believed to be less likely to influence a patient’s mental capacity, but medications, such as narcotic painkillers, that may be used to address treatment side effects can nevertheless impact lucidity and the understanding of medical procedures to which the patient’s consent is required.  Further, when cancer originates or metastasizes within the brain, neurological functioning may be more likely to become compromised, whether temporarily or for the long term.

The presence of powers of attorney within the cancer community according to the study conducted by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine does not differ greatly from the estimate of 71% of Canadians that have Powers of Attorney in place.  Generally, it is a good idea to ensure that individuals of all ages take the time to consider an incapacity plan and to have Power of Attorney documents prepared.  However, cancer patients may be more likely than others to have to make important decisions between different treatment options.  In situations where diminished capacity may become a more likely scenario due to illness (or related treatment) or age, arrangements should be made to ensure that, if one becomes incapable of making important decisions him or herself, someone who can be trusted is authorized and prepared to do so on their behalf.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

18 Aug

Sick Leave for Workers with Ill or Injured Relatives

Hull & Hull LLP Health / Medical, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Dalton McGuinty has announced that, if re-elected, he intends to expand protected leave from work to employees to allow them to care for family members who cannot care for themselves due to serious injury or illness.

Currently, the Family Medical Leave plan allows employees to take up to eight weeks of unpaid leave to care for terminally ill family members. Under the expanded plan, employees would be entitled to the same eight week unpaid leave in order to care for ill or injured family members.

The plan is in addition to the eight weeks of protected leave afforded to employees with terminally ill family members.

Under the current plan, “family members” receives a broad definition: in addition to immediate family members, the definition includes foster children; siblings-in-law, uncles, aunts, nieces and nephews of the employee or the employee’s spouse; spouses of the employee’s grandchildren, uncles, aunts, nephews or nieces; and persons “who consider the employee to be like a family member”.

The employee must be “providing care” to the person. “Care” includes providing psychological or emotional support, or arranging care by a third party.

It is not clear whether the plan would allow employees protected leave to care for elderly or incapable family members. The press releases define the criteria for eligibility as “a serious injury or illness, including cancer or a stroke”.

At present, there is no corresponding Employment Insurance benefit during such leave (there is for leave for employees with terminally ill family members). The Ontario Government is calling on the federal government to extent Employment Insurance benefits to those taking advantage of the proposed expanded program.

Thanks for reading.

Paul E. Trudelle – Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle

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