Tag: matrimonial

11 Dec

Preserving the Right to an Equalization of Net Family Properties

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Support After Death, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice highlights the importance of preserving a surviving married spouse’s ability to elect for an equalization of net family properties within the six-month limitation period.

Upon death, a surviving married spouse in Ontario can elect for an equalization of net family properties under Sections 5 and 6 of the Family Law Act instead of taking under the predeceasing spouse’s will or, if the spouse has not left a will, on intestacy.  Subsections 6(10), 6(11), and 7(3)(c) of the Family Law Act provide that the surviving spouse must ordinarily make an election within six months of date of death and not after that date.  The Court may, however, extend the election deadline in the event that: (a) there are apparent grounds for relief; (b) relief is unavailable because of delay that has been incurred in good faith; and, (c) no person will suffer substantial prejudice by reason of the delay (subsection 2(8) of the Family Law Act).

Courts have reviewed the circumstances in which an extension is typically ordered.  The requirement that the delay be incurred in good faith has been interpreted as meaning that the party has acted honestly and with no ulterior motive (see, for example, Busch v Amos, 1994 CanLII 7454 (ONSC)).

In Mihalcin v Templeman, 2018 ONSC 5385, a surviving spouse had commenced two claims with respect to the estate of her late husband and an inter vivos gift made to a live-in caregiver.  However, neither of the proceedings had sought any relief relating to an equalization of net family properties, nor did the wife take any steps to make an election or to extend the time within which she was permitted to do so.  The Court reviewed whether the delay in making the election was in good faith.  The evidence regarding the reasons for the delay in electing for equalization were considered to be vague and insufficient to satisfy the evidentiary burden that the delay was incurred in good faith.  Accordingly, the applicant was not permitted to amend her pleadings to incorporate this relief.

Justice Bruce Fitzpatrick commented as follows with respect to the importance of limitation periods, generally (at para 48):

I am mindful of the general importance of limitation periods for the conduct of litigation. There is an obligation on parties to put forward all known legitimate claims within certain time limits. In this case, the time limit was relatively short. I think it cannot be readily ignored. The evidentiary record is not sufficient for me to say that justice requires me to exercise my discretion in favour of allowing [the applicant] to amend her claim so as to include a claim for equalization in all of the circumstances.

Where an equalization of net family properties may be sought at a later time (for example, pending the outcome of a will challenge or dependant’s support application), it is prudent to seek an extension well before the expiry of the six-month limitation period as courts may or may not assist a surviving spouse in seeking this relief down the road, if and when it may become advisable.

Thank you for reading,

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog entries/podcasts that may be of interest:

 

18 Oct

“Ordinarily Occupied” When Not Occupied

Hull & Hull LLP Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Yesterday, I blogged on a case that considered whether a cottage could be considered a second “matrimonial home” for equalization purposes under the Family Law Act. Today, I would like to consider a case that addresses whether a home that was vacated by a claimant prior to the spouse’s death could be considered to be a “matrimonial home”.

In Brash v. Zyma, 2013 ONSC 2800 (CanLII), the 90 year old widow vacated the home and moved into an assisted care facility as a result of her medical condition. Her husband remained in their home. The husband subsequently died. The surviving spouse commenced an equalization claim under the Family Law Act. The husband’s estate argued that the home was not a “matrimonial home” at the time of death, and therefore the value at the date of marriage should be deducted from the husband’s NFP.

The court considered the wording of s. 18(1) of the Family Law Act, and the question of whether the fact that the spouse was not residing at the property on the date of death impacted on her claim for equalization.

Section 18(1) reads: “Every property in which a person has an interest and that is or, if the spouses have separated, was at the time of separation ordinarily occupied by the person and his or her spouse as their family residence is their matrimonial home.”

The court had to consider whether, at the time of “separation”, the property was ordinarily occupied by the wife and her spouse. The court noted an earlier decision of Gray v. Brusby, 56 R.F.L. (6th) 165, where Greer J. stated that “there are many cases where only one of the spouses remains in the home, either on consent of the parties or under court Order. In those cases, the matrimonial home remains such for NFP purposes.” The court went on to observe that physical separation does not equate to a separation of the parties. Here, the parties never intended to separate, or ceased to be married, or ceased to be a couple, or commenced living their lives without the other. 

As the widow ceased to reside in the matrimonial home as a result of her deteriorating medical condition, and not by reason of any intention on her part, the court concluded that the home was “ordinarily occupied” by her on the date of death, and thus was a matrimonial home, and the value of the home at the date of marriage could not be deducted in the equalization calculation.

Have a great weekend.

Paul Trudelle

17 Oct

Intention Matters: Matrimonial Homes

Hull & Hull LLP Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

At a recent Trusts and Estates Brown Bag Lunch (held on the third Tuesday of most months at various locations: see the OBA web page, here), we discussed the case of Egan v. Burton, 2013 ONSC 3063 (CanLII).

There, in the context of a family law proceeding, the issue was whether a cottage was a matrimonial home, thereby affecting the spouses’ Net Family Property and equalization. If the cottage was a “matrimonial home”, then the husband, who owned the cottage, would not get the credit for the value of the cottage at the time of marriage.

The court held that a two-part test should be applied to determine whether the cottage was a “matrimonial home”. Firstly, was the cottage ordinarily used by the spouses, and secondly, was it used as a family residence.

Here, the court found that the first part of the test was met: the cottage was used by the spouses. However, with respect to the second part of the test, the court found that the wife never treated the cottage as a family residence. The wife treated the cottage differently than the family home. She made no contribution to the operation or maintenance of the cottage. She did not show the same interest in the cottage that she showed to the home. “If she had been asked prior to separation about her intention regarding the cottage, I am satisfied that she would have said that it was his cottage and his alone.” Here, unlike other cases where the cottage was found to be a matrimonial home, there was no evidence of an intention to treat the cottage as a family home.

In the estates context, in advancing or defending a claim for equalization under s. 5(2) of the Family Law Act, consideration should be given to not only the use of a secondary residence, but also the intention of the parties and how the second residence was treated by them.

Thank you for reading.

Paul Trudelle

16 Jun

The Valuation of Life Estates

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Recently, I was looking over some of the leading cases in life estates. One of the questions that stood out in my mind was whether or not a life estate has a quantifiable value.

Aho v. Kelly, was heard in British Columbia in 1998, but remains a leading Canadian case that is often referred to when the valuation of life estates are being considered.

In Aho v. Kelly the wife and two children of the deceased were each left a 1/3 interest in the matrimonial home of the deceased. The court confirmed that the wife of the Deceased also held a life interest in the same matrimonial home, as per the jurisprudence in British Columbia. The wife commenced an application seeking a court order that the property be sold and the proceeds be unequally divided amongst the three owners of the property.

The wife argued that the proceeds should be unequally divided because she was entitled to further compensation as she had to be paid out for her life interest.

The Court held that a life estate is a property interest that has “some value”. The Honourable Justice Bauman stated that at common law a life estate is alienable, and that upon its transfer to another party it becomes an “estate pur autre vie” (that other life being the original life tenant). The Court concluded that the life interest has a value capable of capitalization, and that this value should be paid out of the proceeds from the sale of the house.

Aho v. Kelly is not binding in Ontario, however it goes a very far way in establishing the framework by which the value of the life interest can be calculated.

Thank you for reading and have a great day,

Rick Bickhram – Click here for more information on Rick Bickhram.
 

01 Jul

Dependant Relief and the Succession Law Reform Act – Hull on Estates #117

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Dependant Relief.

This week on Hull on Estates, Natalia Angelini and Craig Vander Zee discuss dependant relief and reference a variety of cases that utilized the Succession Law Reform Act.

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

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