Tag: marriage

12 Sep

The Estate Planning Pitfalls of an Invalid Marriage

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, General Interest, In the News, News & Events, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent story in the news featuring a fraudulent wedding officiant, raises some interesting estate planning issues. Mr. Cogan, who held himself out as an authorized wedding officiant, was charged with performing unauthorized marriages. Cogan had been licensed to perform marriages in the past, but it is reported that his license was revoked before he performed at least 48 marriages between August 2013 and July 2016.

Fortunately, pursuant to section 31 of the Marriage Act, if the couple married in good faith the marriage may be deemed valid despite the revoked licence. Indicia of good faith include: the intention to have a legally binding wedding, no disqualifications due to capacity and impairment, and proof that the couple lived together after the wedding ceremony.

The Estate Planning Pitfalls of an Invalid Marriage
“Notwithstanding this statutory remedy, larger consequences for estate planning arise if the couple do not satisfy the prerequisites for the remedy provided in the Marriage Act.”

Notwithstanding this statutory remedy, larger consequences for estate planning arise if the couple do not satisfy the prerequisites for the remedy provided in the Marriage Act.

Firstly, an invalid marriage may present an issue for individuals who created a will after the fact, leaving bequests to their “spouses” in their wills. Due to the fact the individuals are not “spouses” as defined pursuant to the intestacy provisions of the Succession Law Reform Act (excluding Part V) or Divorce Act, it would be interesting to see how the court would treat the inheritance should the spouse who made the will die.

Pursuant to Part V of the Succession Law Reform Act, if the couple has been cohabiting continuously for a period of not less than three years, or are in a relationship of some permanence, or if they are the natural or adoptive parents of a child, they may be considered a dependant spouse (within the meaning of Part V). This may entitle the individual a fair share of the estate in this case, but being recognized as an unmarried spouse is not always certain. In any case, it would be necessary to litigate the issue, adding an unnecessary expense to the estate.

Secondly, an invalid marriage would create issues for individuals who die intestate. Pursuant to the intestacy provisions of the Succession Law Reform Act,  the spouse is first entitled to the preferential share ($200,000) of an estate. If an individual dies and their marriage was not valid, the spouse that would normally be entitled may be disinherited. The result of this is that the preferential share may go to somebody who was not meant to inherit such a large portion of the estate.

Thirdly, a will is automatically revoked upon marriage. Because he did not have the authority to perform marriages, if a person was “married” by Cogan but had a pre-existing will, that will might not be found to have actually been revoked. This uncertainty creates the potential for litigation.

Thanks for reading,

Ian M. Hull

12 May

Will Automatically Revoked Upon Marriage

Stuart Clark Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently came across an article published in the Toronto Star with a headline sure to catch the attention of any estates lawyer: How Ontario disinherits children in second marriages.

In the article, the author details what they believe to be the lack of awareness that many people have regarding the legal effect that a second marriage may have upon their estate plan. In outlining such concerns, the author provides the following eye-catching statement:

“Here’s a little-known fact: A second marriage invalidates your will – automatically disinheriting your children”.

While the first part of this sentence is true (subject to certain exceptions, a Will is automatically revoked upon marriage by section 16 of the Succession Law Reform Act), the second part is not necessarily true, insofar as, just because a Will is revoked upon marriage, it does not necessarily follow that the Deceased’s children would be “disinherited” by such an action. It should also be noted that the automatic revocation of a Will upon marriage by section 16 of the Succession Law Reform Act does not only apply to second marriages, but any marriage which the testator may enter into after the Will was executed.

With respect to the statement that the second marriage has the effect of “disinheriting” your children, if the Deceased should not have executed a further Last Will and Testament following their marriage, they will have died intestate. In Ontario, intestate estates are governed by Part II of the Succession Law Reform Act, which provides that, should the Deceased have died leaving a surviving married spouse and children, the first $200,000.00 of their estate is to go to the surviving spouse as a “preferential share”, with whatever remains after the payment of the preferential share being distributed to the spouse and children in accordance with specified allotments. If the Deceased should only have had one child, whatever remains after the preferential share would be distributed 50% to the spouse and 50% to the child. If the Deceased should have had two or more children, 1/3 would be distributed to the surviving spouse, with the remaining 2/3 being equally distributed to the Deceased’s children. To this effect, so long as the Deceased’s estate is valued at greater than $200,000.00, the Deceased’s children would not be “disinherited” by the marriage per se, although they could of course have stood to inherit a greater amount had the Deceased executed a new Will.QLWIIBIEWM

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

25 Apr

Predatory Marriages and their Effect on Wills

Ian Hull Capacity, Elder Law, Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent article in the Toronto Star discusses how the current state of the law in Ontario makes elderly individuals vulnerable to predatory marriages. In Ontario, under section 16 of the Succession Law Reform Act, RSO 1990, c S.26 (the “SLRA”), a will is automatically revoked by the marriage of the testator.

blog photo - predatory marriageThere is a discrepancy regarding the capacity required to
make a will and the capacity required to marry. In Banton v Banton, [1998] OJ No 3528, the court considered a situation in which an 88 year old man, George, married a 31 year old waitress at his nursing home, Muna. After their marriage, amidst concerns regarding his capacity, George prepared a will leaving everything to Muna. The court found that George did not have testamentary capacity and that his will was invalid, but found that the capacity to marry was a lower standard, requiring that an individual be capable of understanding the nature of the relationship and the obligations and responsibilities it involves. Accordingly, George and Muna’s marriage was valid and George was found to have died intestate.

The issue is that, even if wills executed following a potentially predatory marriage are found invalid as a result of incapacity or undue influence, the marriage may still be valid, and thus the intestacy provisions of the SLRA will be relevant. Under Part II of the SLRA, if a deceased passes with a spouse and children, the spouse is entitled to a preferential share in the amount of $200,000, in addition to a share of the residue of the property after payment of the preferential share.

The Star article suggests that the law nullifying wills on marriage makes it easy for a predatory bride or groom to take advantage of elderly individuals. It points out that Ontario law regarding revocation of wills upon marriage is lagging behind other provinces, namely Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec, none of which statutorily revoke wills after marriage. In Alberta in particular, it was noted that the remedial legislation was made after a study revealed that few people were aware that wills did not survive a new marriage.

It is therefore possible in Ontario that an elderly person who intends to leave their entire estate to their children could be caught unaware that their existing will was revoked by marriage, with no knowledge of the need to execute a new one. It is also possible that a testator may not even have the capacity to make a new will after entering a predatory marriage and will be left without recourse. With an aging population, elder abuse, which often takes the form of financial abuse, is a very serious concern. Consequently, it may be time for Ontario to consider measures to protect elderly or vulnerable individuals against predatory marriages.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

21 Nov

Hull on Estates Episode #311 – Beneficiary Designations When a Will Is Revoked

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

 Listen to: Hull on Estates Episode #311 – Beneficiary Designations When a Will Is Revoked 

 

This week on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Holly LeValliant discuss beneficiary designations when a will is revoked. More specifically, they discuss a recent decision made by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice: Petch v. Kuivila, 2012 ONSC 6131 (CanLII).

If you have any questions, please email us at hull.lawyers@gmail.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Holly LeValliant

 

26 Aug

How ‘predatory marriages’ affect property and estates

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The August 13, 2010 edition of Lawyers Weekly featured an article by Kimberly Whaley with the above-captioned title. The article dealt with the relationship between marriage, property, and estates and the resulting risk of predatory marriages.

I think it’s safe to presume that the majority of people believe that once they have executed a Will, their carefully considered estate plans are locked in. However, the provisions people make for their loved ones upon their death are not exactly locked in. According to Ontario law, marriage automatically revokes a Will.

While shocking for many people, there are ways to avoid this unwanted consequence of marriage. For instance, where a person executes a Will in contemplation of marriage, his or her testamentary plans will survive the marriage.

The automatic revocation of a Will can lead to unfortunate and unintended results, particularly when individuals have capacity to marry, but lack the capacity to manage property and/or execute a Will. In such circumstances, a person who lacks testamentary capacity may end up the target of a greedy opportunist looking to marry for money.

In Ontario, where a person’s Will is revoked upon her marriage and she dies, her estate is distributed under succession law as if she died without a Will. According to the Succession Law Reform Act (“SLRA”), when the deceased, who dies intestate, is survived by a spouse and there are no issue, the surviving spouse takes all property of the deceased’s absolutely. Where the deceased dies with a net value of more than the “preferential share” and with a surviving spouse and issue, the surviving spouse is entitled to the preferential share, being $200,000, absolutely. After the preferential share is distributed to the surviving spouse, the surviving spouse is entitled to a distributive share, which varies with the number of children or issue surviving. If, for example, there is a surviving spouse and one child, the excess above and beyond the $200,000 is allocated equally between the spouse and the child. Where there is a surviving spouse and more than one child, the spouse is entitled to a third of the excess and the remainder is divided equally between the children. 

The scenario that immediately comes to mind is one where an elderly and frail individual is preyed upon by a younger person who sees the marriage as an opportunity to abscond with the property of the elderly spouse who lacks capacity to manage property during his/her life or execute a Will.

In my next blog, on September 6, 2010, I discuss this topic in more detail, focusing on why predatory marriages are, perhaps, too easily accomplished.  

12 Jun

Same-Sex Marriages and their Impact on Estate Law and Administration – Hull on Estates #114

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Same-Sex Marriages and their Impact on Estate Law and Administration.

This week on Hull and Estates, Rick Bickhram and David Smith discuss how changes in the definition of marriage have impacted Estate Law and Estate Administration.

Comments? Send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com, call us on the comment line at 206-350-6636, or leave us a comment on the Hull on Estates blog.

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10 Apr

Contemplating “In Contemplation of Marriage” – Hull on Estates Podcast #54

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Wills Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to "Contemplation "In Contemplation of Marriage""

Read the transcribed version of "Contemplation "In Contemplation of Marriage""

During Hull on Estates Podcast #54, David Smith, Partner at Hull & Hull LLP, discusses his upcoming Probator article (check the Hull & Hull website soon) which concerns making a Will in contemplation of marriage.

David discusses the circumstances that surround this clause, Section 16 of the Succession Law Reform Act and how this issue can cause litigation. 

 

03 Apr

Estate Planning Considerations in the Context of Married and Unmarried Spouses – Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Podcast #54

Hull & Hull LLP Beneficiary Designations, Funerals, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to "Estate Planning Considerations in the Context of Married and Unmarried Spouses"

Read the transcribed version of "Estate Planning Considerations in the Context of Married and Unmarried Spouses"

During Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Episode #54, Ian and Suzana discuss how to avoid Will drafting problems when creating beneficiary designations for insurance trusts.

They also discuss the importance of including funeral arrangements in your Will, and the various Provincial approaches to the revocation of wills after marriage and after a divorce.

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