Tag: make a will

06 Jan

Estate Planning: Starting 2021 on the Right Foot

Ian Hull Estate Planning Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Ah, January. A new year, a new start. This year, more than any other, people are putting 2020 behind them with ‘extreme prejudice’, and planning for a much different and much better year ahead.

Some will be giving up sugar, others will take up running, or tackling that Spanish language textbook that’s been sitting in the corner since the first season of Narcos. Some of us will even get our estate affairs in order.

With that in mind, we present a few considerations for 2021 when making sure our affairs are all set.

A Power of Attorney: Nobody expects to lose the ability to make financial decisions. But it does happen, and as we age, the risks increase. Giving someone you trust the power to make decisions for you in the event you’re no longer able to do so, can save a lot of time down the road, and a lot of money in legal expenses.

A Will: Without one, your assets will be divided according to provincial law. If you have children, and no Will, your kids may be placed in the care of a guardian who is maybe not your first choice. It is your “last word” and the single most important document in your estate files. Our colleague, Kira Domratchev, blogged about the importance of a Will in November of 2020.

Banking Information: According to the Bank of Canada at the end of 2019, there were approximately 2.1 million unclaimed balances, worth $888 million, sitting in unclaimed bank accounts across the country. Have a list of your banks and accounts, including safety deposit boxes, and ensure that your family knows where it is.

Insurance Policies: Many insurance plans provide benefits for funeral plans or list a chosen beneficiary who is entitled to the policy. Make sure that your insurance plan is up to date, and keep copies close to your Will. This also applies to any RRSPs or pension plans that may include a benefit to someone in the event that something were to happen.

Proof of Ownership: Whether it’s the family cottage, that 1965 Mustang GT 390 Fastback, or your condo in Kitsilano: Without proof of ownership, your family may not know what you have or where it is.

Passwords: As we have blogged in the past, your online presence needs proper safeguards, but also creates important considerations for your executor or trustee who will need access to your online information and/or assets. Whether you use an online password manager, such as these, or keep an old-fashioned paper list, make sure it can be found by your family if needed.

Finally, these documents are important and need to be kept safe. Thankfully, in January of 2020, the New York Times undertook an investigation to determine the best fireproof documents safe. You can read about the results here.

We wish you all the very best in 2021, and thanks for reading!

Ian Hull and Daniel Enright

26 Nov

Dealing with an Intestacy: the Importance of Making a Will

Kira Domratchev Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Recent reports indicate that Chadwick Boseman is the latest celebrity to die without a Will. His wife is currently seeking to be appointed administrator of his Estate.

This certainly shows that many people, including those with significant assets, often procrastinate when it comes to preparing a Will. The fact is that, no matter how many assets you have, a sound estate plan can help you address any potential tax liabilities, take advantage of certain planning strategies and otherwise make life much easier for your beneficiaries, as addressing an intestate estate can often have its challenges.

The benefits of making a Will are numerous, including (but not limited to) the ability to:

  1. Decide who gets certain personal items after your death;
  2. In contrast to an intestacy, provide for your children (if any), particularly if they are minors;
  3. Consider whether there are any parties who can complicate the distribution of your estate and address potential strategies in response to that;
  4. Appreciate what assets will form a part of your estate and what assets will flow outside of your estate, as well as the benefits associated with either;
  5. Take care of any pets that you may have (particularly those that may be expensive to maintain); and
  6. Decide who will be in charge of administering your estate.

Without a Will, you essentially leave the decisions respecting your assets in the hands of others and more often than not, in the hands of the Court. In certain situations, having no estate plan may fuel disagreements between your heirs which may leave long lasting effects on family relationships.

I, for one, think these are great reasons to make an estate plan!

Incidentally, it is “Make a Will Month” with the Ontario Bar Association. Click here for more details.

Thanks for reading.

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Distribution on Intestacy: The Preferential Share

Who’s an Heir Under the Laws of Intestacy in Ontario?

Separation and Intestacy Rights – How Not to Benefit Your Spouse

28 Dec

Estate Planning over the Holidays

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, General Interest, New Years Resolutions Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The holiday season is upon us, and with it comes family gatherings, buying and wrapping gifts, and travel.  Suffice to say, it can be a hectic and busy time.  Nonetheless, with 2018 on the horizon, many of us take the time to reflect and set resolutions for the upcoming year.  Despite this, so many Canadians do not have a Will.

Why not?  Estate planning need not be trying, and the holiday season is a perfect time to start considering your estate plan.

With this in mind, I thought I would highlight an article from the Globe and Mail which does a great job of highlighting issues to get you thinking about your estate plan:

  1. Get started – make a detailed list of your assets, liabilities, and joint assets, and think about your family’s needs and lifestyle.
  2. Consider your options – do you want your bequests to be absolute, subject to the terms of a trust, or gifted during your lifetime?
  3. Appoint representatives – think about who you trust to administer your estate and ensure that they are up for the job.
  4. Special circumstances – are there any beneficiaries who have special circumstances such as those receiving ODSP, that would benefit from specific trusts?
  5. Taxation – meet with a professional to understand tax consequences and the vehicles available to limit the payment of taxes, including the use of joint ownership and estate freezes.
  6. Cottages – should your estate involve the cherished family cottage, think about whether you want it sold, or shared amongst family members. If the latter, think about preparing a co-ownership agreement.

Wishing all of our readers a happy New Year!

Noah Weisberg

Consider this blog interesting? Please consider these other relate blogs:

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