Tag: long-term care

02 Aug

Aging in Place in Canada

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent survey commissioned by HomeEquity Bank suggests that the majority of older Canadians plan on staying in their homes as they age (otherwise known as aging in place) rather than downsizing and/or moving into assisted living or retirement communities.  93% of survey respondents aged 65 or older felt that it was important that they remain at their current home throughout retirement.  69% of them advised that their primary reason for wishing to remain at home was to maintain independence as they age.

The older respondents (75 years or older) advised that it was important to them that they remain in their current home to stay close to family, friends, and/or the community (51%) and that emotional attachment and memories were also contributing factors (40%).

In order to remain living at home as long as possible into retirement, advance planning in terms of finances and logistics may be necessary.  A recent article appearing in Forbes suggests that the following steps, unrelated to financial planning, may be especially useful in facilitating successful aging in place:

  • Maintaining social connections to avoid social isolation;
  • Identifying who will help, whether family members, friends, or public services;
  • Planning for the transition as needs change over time and identifying the resources and services available in the community;
  • Preparing the home to accommodate increased needs (for example, by installing grab bars and a chair in the shower);
  • Reviewing and updating the plan to age in place as may be necessary (due to a change in health, available support, or financial constraints).

Notwithstanding one’s plans to continue living at the family home, increasing longevity, a lack of liquidity, unrealistic expectations in terms of income sources after retirement, and the high cost (or local inaccessibility) of caregiving services may contribute to a decision to sell the home and relocate earlier than intended.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

07 Dec

Geriatric and Long-Term Care Review Committee Annual Report for 2013-2014

Ian Hull Elder Law Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In October 2015, the Geriatric and Long-Term Care Review Committee (the “Committee”) of the Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario released their Annual Report for 2013 and 2014 (the “Report”). The purpose of the Report is to review circumstances surrounding deaths of elderly persons that have been investigated by the Office of the Chief Coroner and brought to the attention of the Committee, with a view towards recommending preventative measures.

Over the years, the Committee has identified themes that have been consistently present in the cases they review, including “communication/documentation” and “determination of capacity and consent for treatment”.

In 2013, the Committee reviewed 26 deaths, and in 2014, they reviewed 19 deaths. The four most common areas for improvement identified in the report were:

  • Medical and nursing management;
  • Communication between healthcare practitioners regarding the elderly;
  • Medical/Nursing documentation; and
  • Use of drugs in the elderly.

The Report and the recommendations generated in each case are made available to doctors, nurses, healthcare providers, social service agencies, and others, for the purposes of death prevention awareness. The organizations and agencies to whom the recommendations have been provided, are then asked to report to the Office of the Chief Coroner within one year of receipt, and provide an update on the status of their implementation. However, the organizations are not legally obligated to implement or respond to the recommendations.

It is also noted in the Report that “[t]rends or themes may exist due to a selection bias of cases that are referred to the [Committee] for discretionary review.” The Report also states that due to “resource issues”, the Reports for 2013 and 2014 have been summarized and combined. Therefore, there are potential deficiencies and areas in which there is room for improvement.

Reducing avoidable deaths of elderly persons is a moral imperative. Although the fact that this Report exists is a step in the right direction, we should continue to appreciate the seriousness of the issue and to examine how needless deaths of elderly persons can be prevented.

Thanks for reading.

Ian Hull

10 Aug

Is Long Term Care Insurance Something You Should be Thinking About?

Ian Hull Elder Law Insurance Issues Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week, Suzana’s blog post discussed longevity planning and Powers of Attorney for Personal Care (POA PC). She mentioned that, while financial and estate plans tend to focus on assets, a longevity plan or a POA PC is important in order to address other issues such as quality of life planning and health care instructions. Long-term care insurance is one instance where these plans overlap.

As life expectancy increases, planning for retirement becomes more important. The possibility that you may have health care or long-term care expenses later in life is becoming increasingly likely. Long-term care could include in-home care or moving into a long-term care facility, both of which come with high costs.

As one article, Do you need long-term care insurance?, posted on MoneySense.ca points out, long-term care insurance is more common in the U.S. than in Canada. However, although some costs for long-term care may be publicly funded in Canada, most such expenses will need to be paid for by the individual. Thus, there are several options to choose from when considering how to fund long-term care:

  • Save for retirement in amounts sufficient to cover any expenses which may arise;
  • Rely on your children or other family members to contribute financially; or
  • Purchase long-term care insurance

To illustrate the importance of thinking about how to fund possible long-term care, consider the example of a couple, one of whom becomes ill and requires long-term care in a facility. After funding this care, the other partner may be left with very few financial resources to pay for their own retirement or long-term care costs further down the road.

However, if you wait too long to purchase long-term care insurance, the premiums may be more expensive than you would like and could turn insurance into a non-viable option. This leads us back to the importance of planning. Whether you decide to purchase insurance, or save to cover any eventual expenses yourself, it is vital to plan ahead and keep in mind that the amount you may require during retirement may be greater than you expect, especially if you or your partner end up requiring care later in life.

Thank you for reading.

Ian Hull

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