Tag: long-term care

24 Jun

Inaugural OBA Elder Law Day Conference

Natalia R. Angelini Elder Law, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this week I was so pleased to participate in the kick-off of the first OBA Elder Law Day Conference. We had a full day of venerated experts addressing a wide array of issues impacting older Ontarians (our fastest growing demographic). With more than a dozen speakers, including a key-note presentation by Jane Meadus of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE), the materials for the program are a must read.

Much was learned, including about our long-term care (LTC) system, which the health crisis has brought into greater focus. Audrey Miller, our final presenter for the day, looked at LTC challenges exacerbated by our aging population outpacing the accommodations available, and cited some staggering statistics in that regard.  She also educated us on the LTC application process, which includes:

  • An application is made through the Home and Community Care Support Services (HCCSS) (formerly the LHIN, and, before that, CCAC) for a private room, semi-private, or basic/ward bed (up to 4 beds in a room);
  • The applicant can apply to up to 5 different facilities;
  • The wait time can range from a few months to a few years, with priority being determined by a number of different factors;
  • Once a bed is offered, an applicant has 24-hours to accept it. If refused, barring a significant change in circumstance the person’s name is removed from the lists. Three months must pass before a new application can proceed (though the 3-month penalty has been waived as a result of the pandemic); and
  • Each resident has to pay a monthly co-payment, with the rate varying according to home’s structural class and move-in date.

With increasing demand for LTC facilities, there are many applicants on waitlists. Though most prefer to live at home, they cannot afford to do so given their increasing care needs, the high associated costs and the lack of sufficient publicly funded home care services. It thus comes as no surprise that by the time residents are admitted into LTC, the statistics cited by Ms. Miller indicate that 9/10 of the residents have mental impairment, over 40% exhibit aggressive behaviours due to their cognitive condition, and 1 in 3 is completely dependent on staff. These figures highlight the critical need and importance of increasing the daily direct care being provided to residents. As noted in my earlier blog, within the next four years the Ontario budget aims to increase direct care to 4 hours per day.

Looking ahead, $3 billion in spending is pledged in the federal budget over five years to strengthen Canada’s LTC systems, a task force is being put into place to develop a new National LTC Services standard, and Ontario’s Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission’s Final Report made numerous recommendations for change. We will be following the progress.

Thanks for reading and have a great day,

Natalia Angelini

03 Jun

Protecting Long-Term Care Home Residents by Promoting Immunization

Arielle Di Iulio Elder Law, General Interest, In the News, Public Policy Tags: , , 0 Comments

On April 30, 2021, the Long-Term Care Covid-19 Commission (the “Commission“) released its Final Report to the Minister of Long-Term Care. This report pulled back the curtain on the dreadful conditions that residents of certain long-term care homes in Ontario have endured during the coronavirus pandemic. It also made recommendations to the Ontario government with respect to improving quality of care for the long-term care resident population. You can read more about the Commission’s report in Ian Hull and Tori Joseph’s recent blog.

It seems that the Ontario government is heeding the Commission’s call to action. On May 31, 2021, Ontario announced that all long-term care homes in the province will be required to put into place certain COVID-19 vaccine policies for staff. The focus of these policies will be on educating long-term care staff about COVID-19 vaccines and promoting full immunization among staff.

The requirements related to the establishment, implementation and reporting on a COVID-19 immunization policy in long-term care homes are set out in the Minister’s Directive: Long-term care home COVID-19 immunization policy (the “Directive“). The objectives of the Directive are to establish a consistent approach to COVID-19 immunization policies in long-term care homes, optimize COVID-19 immunization rates in homes, and ensure that staff make informed decisions about COVID-19 vaccination. To meet these objectives, the Directive provides that every person working in a long-term care home in Ontario will be required to do one of the following:

  • Provide proof of vaccination of each dose;
  • Provide a documented medical reason for not being vaccinated; or
  • Participate in an educational program about the benefits of vaccination and the risks of not being vaccinated.

The Directive is effective as of July 1, 2021, which means that long-term care homes have approximately one month to implement their COVID-19 staff immunization policies.

It is worth noting that Ontario is the first province in Canada to make it mandatory for long-term care homes to have COVID-19 immunization policies for staff and to set out the minimum requirements that need to be included in these policies. Hopefully this will be an effective step towards better protecting the health and well-being of long-term care home residents.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

19 Jan

PGT vs. Cherneyko, Part 2: Breaches of Fiduciary Duty in the Time of Covid

Doreen So Capacity, Ethical Issues, Executors and Trustees, Guardianship, Litigation, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Yesterday, I blogged on Public Guardian and Trustee v. Cherneyko et al, 2021 ONSC 107.  Today’s blog will focus on some of the breaches of fiduciary duty that were found by the Court.  For those who have not read yesterday’s blog, this is a case that involves Jean, a 90 year old woman, and Tina, the attorney for property, who was purportedly given a gift of $250,000.00 just days before Jean was hospitalized for acute delirium and progressive cognitive decline.

While the purported gift of $250,000.00 to Tina was found to be invalid, the Court went on to find that Tina was in breach of her fiduciary duty to Jean by accepting the money.  Tina was in breach because she knew that Jean was exhibiting signs of cognitive decline when they went to the bank.  In the Court’s view,

“a person acting in a fiduciary capacity for a person actively demonstrating moments of irrationality should be very cautious about any big financial moves that person claims they want to make in and around such periods of demonstrated incapacity. Even if Jean was clearly acting in a competent manner during the few hours she attended the CIBC with Tina on August 27, 2019, I agree with the submissions of the PGT it is no answer to an accusation of breach of duty to assert that an attorney was simply acting in accordance with the wishes of the grantor of the attorney. Tina should have proceeded with caution at that time. I find she did not exercise the appropriate degree of caution and good judgment given the circumstances about which she knew.” (para 42)

The Court also reiterated Justice Penny’s comments in Ontario (Public Guardian and Trustee) v. Harkins, [2011] O.J. No. 3313,  that a fiduciary’s first duty is to see to the best interest of the person regardless of what their stated wishes may be.  The Court was very critical of how a $250,000.00 gift to Tina could possibly benefit Jean, and expressed disapproval on how there was no evidence of any effort on Tina’s part in considering whether this money would better serve Jean if it was applied towards Jean’s in-home care instead of admitting Jean to a long term care home.

Of relevance to the unique circumstances that surround the care of others during Covid-19, the Court commented that,

“since March 2020 more than at any time in the past, any genuinely concerned person charged with caring for an elderly person in long term care would have at least considered the issue of taking whatever steps could be taken to remove the person from this situation if it was in any way possible.” (para. 47)

Instead, Tina allowed her adult son to move into Jean’s home, and she was found to be actively misusing Jean’s assets for her own and her family’s benefit which were additional breaches of her duties as fiduciary.  The Court also disapproved of how Tina did not take any steps to sell Jean’s house in order to maximize or preserve its value which, reading between the lines, seem to be a concern for the uncertainty in today’s markets.

Thanks for reading!  Stay safe!

Doreen So

 

08 Jun

“High” Hopes for Improvement of Long-Term Care Facilities in Ontario

Christina Canestraro Elder Law Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week, we blogged on serious deficiencies recently observed in long-term care facilities in Ontario and elsewhere in the country as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. Improvement of conditions in long-term care homes has long been on the radar for many Canadian provinces even prior to Covid-19. The recent pandemic has highlighted many of the shortcomings of long-term care and provided the much-needed impetus for all levels of government to rethink ways to improve living conditions for residents.

One of the key issues highlighted by the pandemic is the reliance many residents have on family and friends to supply necessities such as food, clothing, and personal care items. Thinking about this led me to consider another important supply chain that may be suspended for residents of long-term care facilities; the supply of medical and recreational marijuana.

Prior to the Cannabis Act, S.C. 2018, c. 16, which came into effect on October 17, 2018, it was illegal to possess, obtain, produce, traffic, and import or export cannabis, except for cannabis for medical consumption. The new regime decriminalized the recreational use of cannabis, while regulations dealing with medical cannabis remained in place. The Cannabis Act was introduced for a number of reasons, one of which was to protect public health and safety to allow adults legal access to marijuana.

With the decriminalization of recreational marijuana came the loosening of stigmas surrounding marijuana consumption.  A growing body of scientific studies suggest that marijuana presents a number of health benefits when used appropriately, such as relief of chronic pain, improved lung capacity, and the alleviation of feelings of anxiety and/or depression. The number of seniors using cannabis since 2012 has increased tenfold, with 52% of seniors reporting using cannabis exclusively for medical reasons, 24% for non-medical reasons, and 24% for both medical and non-medical. Unfortunately, accessing and storing marijuana is not as easy for seniors in long-term care as it is for most adults.

Notwithstanding the new regime, medical cannabis is still required to be purchased from a federally licensed producer by doctor’s order. For many residents, their primary care physician is the resident physician in their long-term care home. Naturally, not all practitioners are comfortable prescribing medical marijuana, meaning residents who prefer to consume marijuana must travel offsite to obtain such prescriptions. Even if a resident is able to obtain medical marijuana, individual long-term care facilities may have different policies in place regarding the delivery and storage of marijuana.

For some, the introduction of the Cannabis Act alleviated some of the above-noted issues by making it easier for family members and friends to purchase and deliver cannabis to residents. Given that OHIP does not cover medical marijuana, there is no financial downside to purchasing recreational cannabis (that is supplied by the Ontario Cannabis Store) rather than medical marijuana.  Irrespective of their intention for use, residents in long-term care facilities should enjoy the same accessibility to marijuana as others.

Perhaps this is yet another issue that the government will consider when revitalizing and improving living standards for residents in long-term care facilities.

Thank you for reading!

Christina Canestraro

A special thanks to Jane Meadus and Professor Lorian Hardcastle for their presentation on Marijuana Use in Assisted Living and Long-Term Care Facilities through the Canadian Bar Association on March 12, 2020.

04 Jun

Social distancing in long-term care: did it cause more harm than good?

Sydney Osmar Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

There is no denying that long-term care homes have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Yesterday, the Globe and Mail released a sobering article on the impact social isolation has had on Canada’s long-term care and nursing homes, citing that approximately 82% of the country’s COVID-19 deaths have been linked to long-term care facilities.

Now, family members and advocates for Elders are learning that banning visitors from nursing homes could have inadvertently created negative consequences for residents. Prior to social distancing restrictions having been put into place, relatives and private caregivers were often-times relied upon at mealtimes. Through banning visitors, already short-staffed facilities lost the extra assistance provided by family members and private caregivers.

CanAge, a national seniors’ advocacy organization, is receiving concerning reports that some residents are not being fed, with mealtimes forgotten.

This is especially concerning given the risks that extreme temperatures bring as the summer months approach. Jane Meadus of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (“ACE”) explains that Ontario’s most recent design standards for new long-term care homes (last updated in 2015), still do not require rooms to be air conditioned, only common areas. For more on the difficulties extreme temperatures pose for residents and front-line workers alike, see here.

Heather Keller, who researches nutrition and aging at the University of Waterloo explained further difficulties social isolation poses to residents’ nutrition, especially those with cognitive impairments. When eating alone, residents tend to consume less, as they are not exposed to important social cues they would otherwise get if eating in a dining room setting.

Families and seniors’ organizations are calling on Ontario (and other provinces) to relax restrictions on visits, citing the risks to residents’ physical and mental health.

For more on our coverage of COVID-19’s impacts on long-term care, please see links to the below blogs:

A Call for Change in Toronto’s Long-Term Care Facilities

Are Ontario’s Long-Term Care Facilities Ready for COVID-19?

More needs to be Done to Protect Those in Long-Term Care

TALK 2 NICE: Support for the Elderly During COVID-19

Finally, for information on the Residents’ Bill of Rights within Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007 see Stuart Clark and Doreen So’s podcast here.

Thanks for reading!

Sydney Osmar

02 Aug

Aging in Place in Canada

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent survey commissioned by HomeEquity Bank suggests that the majority of older Canadians plan on staying in their homes as they age (otherwise known as aging in place) rather than downsizing and/or moving into assisted living or retirement communities.  93% of survey respondents aged 65 or older felt that it was important that they remain at their current home throughout retirement.  69% of them advised that their primary reason for wishing to remain at home was to maintain independence as they age.

The older respondents (75 years or older) advised that it was important to them that they remain in their current home to stay close to family, friends, and/or the community (51%) and that emotional attachment and memories were also contributing factors (40%).

In order to remain living at home as long as possible into retirement, advance planning in terms of finances and logistics may be necessary.  A recent article appearing in Forbes suggests that the following steps, unrelated to financial planning, may be especially useful in facilitating successful aging in place:

  • Maintaining social connections to avoid social isolation;
  • Identifying who will help, whether family members, friends, or public services;
  • Planning for the transition as needs change over time and identifying the resources and services available in the community;
  • Preparing the home to accommodate increased needs (for example, by installing grab bars and a chair in the shower);
  • Reviewing and updating the plan to age in place as may be necessary (due to a change in health, available support, or financial constraints).

Notwithstanding one’s plans to continue living at the family home, increasing longevity, a lack of liquidity, unrealistic expectations in terms of income sources after retirement, and the high cost (or local inaccessibility) of caregiving services may contribute to a decision to sell the home and relocate earlier than intended.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

10 Aug

Is Long Term Care Insurance Something You Should be Thinking About?

Ian Hull Elder Law Insurance Issues Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week, Suzana’s blog post discussed longevity planning and Powers of Attorney for Personal Care (POA PC). She mentioned that, while financial and estate plans tend to focus on assets, a longevity plan or a POA PC is important in order to address other issues such as quality of life planning and health care instructions. Long-term care insurance is one instance where these plans overlap.

As life expectancy increases, planning for retirement becomes more important. The possibility that you may have health care or long-term care expenses later in life is becoming increasingly likely. Long-term care could include in-home care or moving into a long-term care facility, both of which come with high costs.

As one article, Do you need long-term care insurance?, posted on MoneySense.ca points out, long-term care insurance is more common in the U.S. than in Canada. However, although some costs for long-term care may be publicly funded in Canada, most such expenses will need to be paid for by the individual. Thus, there are several options to choose from when considering how to fund long-term care:

  • Save for retirement in amounts sufficient to cover any expenses which may arise;
  • Rely on your children or other family members to contribute financially; or
  • Purchase long-term care insurance

To illustrate the importance of thinking about how to fund possible long-term care, consider the example of a couple, one of whom becomes ill and requires long-term care in a facility. After funding this care, the other partner may be left with very few financial resources to pay for their own retirement or long-term care costs further down the road.

However, if you wait too long to purchase long-term care insurance, the premiums may be more expensive than you would like and could turn insurance into a non-viable option. This leads us back to the importance of planning. Whether you decide to purchase insurance, or save to cover any eventual expenses yourself, it is vital to plan ahead and keep in mind that the amount you may require during retirement may be greater than you expect, especially if you or your partner end up requiring care later in life.

Thank you for reading.

Ian Hull

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