Tag: Long Term Care Homes Act

04 Nov

Economic Recession, Social Recession, or Both?

Suzana Popovic-Montag Health / Medical Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Just as an economic recession has serious ramifications for our society, so too does a social recession. A social recession can be described as a phenomenon whereby social bonds and human connection unravel the longer we are without interaction. Similar to an economic downturn, a social recession can have significant physical and psychological effects on people. Of particular concern to many is the effect that such a recession will have on the elderly, an already vulnerable population.

Restrictions in long-term care homes resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic have only magnified a deeper rooted pandemic of loneliness that was already in existence. The virus also shed light on an already strained and crumbling system. CBC Marketplace found that 538 of the 632 long-term care homes in Ontario were repeat offenders of abuse, inadequate infection control, inadequate hydration, unsafe medication storage, and poor skin and wound care. These homes were in direct violation of the Long-Term Care Homes Act and Regulations.

The importance of human connection cannot be underestimated. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, found that people with higher levels of social connection experience less inflammation (which is attributed to many chronic diseases) than those who are more isolated. Toronto long-term care resident, Devora Greenspon, although not infected with Covid-19, described her loneliness as “so deep it feels like a disease.”

Residents in Ontario’s long-term care homes have pleaded with the government to address the mass devastation caused by social isolation. It is crucial that elders and long-term care residents are protected from the spread of Covid-19. However, it is equally as important to halt the plague of loneliness from spreading any further. There must be a greater focus on the devastating effects of isolation on elders’ mental health as a healthy mind can often be the greatest weapon against disease. The inevitability of a social recession should not be overlooked.

Thanks for reading!

Suzana Popovic-Montag and Tori Joseph

05 Jun

Blowing the Whistle on Nursing Homes

Paul Emile Trudelle Elder Law, In the News Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent report of the Canadian Armed Forces into the state of five Ontario nursing homes has shed light on disturbing issues inside of the homes.

Early into the COVID state of emergency, the Canadian Armed Forces was asked to assist at 5 Ontario nursing homes, and 25 Quebec nursing homes. In the course of their duties, the Armed Forces noted serious shortcomings at the nursing homes. The report has led to calls for various action, including a coroner’s investigation, and possible police investigations.

It should be noted that there is a statutory duty on everyone to report any suspected impropriety occurring at a long-term care facility. Specifically, s. 24 of the Long Term Care Homes Act, 2007 requires that a person who has reasonable grounds to suspect any of the following has occurred or may occur to immediately report the suspicion and the reasons upon which it is based to the Director of Long Term Care:

  • improper or incompetent treatment or care of a resident that resulted in harm or a risk of harm to the resident;
  • abuse of a resident by anyone or neglect of a resident by the licensee or staff that resulted in harm or a risk of harm to the resident;
  • unlawful conduct that resulted in harm or a risk of harm to a resident;
  • misuse or misappropriation of a resident’s money; or
  • misuse or misappropriation of funding provided to a licensee.

While there is an obligation on everyone to report the suspicion of such conduct, it is only an offence if certain described individuals fail to report. These individuals include the licensee, an officer or director of any corporate licensee, a staff member, or any person who provides professional health, social work or social services to a resident or licensee.

Long term care licensees also have a statutory obligation to ensure that any alleged, suspected or witnessed incident of abuse of a resident by anyone, neglect of a resident by the licensee or staff is investigated, and that “appropriate action” is taken in response to any incident. The results of the licensee’s investigation and the action taken in response are to be reported to the Director. Further, the Act requires that the licensee must establish a procedure for initiating complaints to the licensee and for how the licensee deals with the complaints.

The report of the Canadian Armed Forces will, hopefully, bring about positive change for a vulnerable, often voiceless segment of society. Others should (or in some cases, must) also come forward to report harmful conditions or conduct. If you see something, say something.

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

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