Tag: Long term care home

15 May

TALK 2 NICE: Support for the Elderly During COVID-19

Paul Emile Trudelle General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Today I learned about the National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly (“NICE”) and their Talk 2 NICE program.

NICE is an international network of researchers, practitioners and students dedicated to improving the care of older adults. Members come from a broad spectrum of disciplines and professions.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, NICE is providing free outreach and counselling to older adults and persons with disabilities. Callers are able to speak to social workers or social work students. Talk 2 NICE can be reached toll free at 1 (844) 529-7292. Or, a time for a call from Talk 2 NICE can be scheduled on their webpage. The program can also be accessed over the internet by clicking on a link. Referrals for friends or family members are also accepted.

Callers have a choice of scheduling either a 15 minute or 30 minute “Friendly Check-In”.

The call is designed to help those socially isolated and lonely due to the current crisis. The service is also offered to caregivers. The trained volunteers will provide uplifting phone calls that respond flexibly to the needs of the caller, and will offer information about other available resource

Another excellent resource provided by NICE is a pamphlet entitled “To Stay Or To Go?: Moving Family from Institutional Care to your Home During the COVID-19 Pandemic”. The brochure discusses a number of considerations to be taken into account when considering whether to remove a family member from a Long-Term Care Facility.

Mental health should be top of mind during these unique times. This is particularly so for the elderly. The service provided by NICE is an excellent resource. Pass on this information to anyone who may benefit from such a call.

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

P.S. Call your mother (or anyone else you know who may benefit from an isolation-breaking telephone call).

14 Apr

More Needs to be Done to Protect Those in Long-Term Care

Natalia R. Angelini In the News Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

I was heartened last week to see Ontario’s Premier pushing for personal protection equipment (PPE), and to read here that he has joined forces with Hayley Wickenheiser and many volunteers to obtain, organize and distribute PPE to front-line workers. This equipment is desperately needed in hospitals and health care facilities, and especially for residents and workers in Long-Term Care Homes (LTCH) who have been vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sadly, half of our country’s deaths are noted as connected to LTCH.

More needs to be done to protect those in LTCH, as many of the elderly and their families are suffering greatly as a result of the rapid spread of the disease.  It is heartbreaking to regularly see media reports of yet another outbreak and more deaths. Pinecrest Nursing Home is Bobcaygeon, Ontario has sustained tremendous loss, with nearly half of its residents reportedly succumbing to the disease. Another tragic loss of life has taken place in a Montreal LTCH, where 31 residents have died in the last month. Some deaths are from the virus, and staff not reporting to work may also have contributed to the devastation. Police and public health investigations are ongoing in that case, as reported here.

Increased staff absences in an already strained system are surely aggravating the suffering, in addition to staff mobility between facilities. Many staff are part-time workers, and also work in other homes or hospitals to supplement their income. Ontario has not yet clamped down on the issue, but here it is reported that British Columbia has learned a hard lesson after an outbreak at one of its LTCH and upon obtaining evidence that care staff were potentially carrying the virus from home to home. As a result, an Order of the Provincial Health Officer was issued to restrict the movement of staff by ensuring that they work in only one facility.

In Ontario, the Chief Medical Officer of Health has released a Directive for LTCH. However, we have yet to see a firm commitment to mandate working at a single facility. This is particularly worrisome when coupled with the relaxed screening measures recently implemented by way of O. Reg. 95/20: Order Under Subsection 7.0.2 (4) of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. E.9 – Streamlining Requirements for Long-Term Care Homes. I support the government taking urgent measures intended to help our most vulnerable elderly Ontarians, but hope that soon we can receive  assurance that immediate action is being taken to support the new measures, including adequate testing, tracking, tracing, isolation, quarantine, PPE and training.

Thanks for reading and stay safe,

Natalia Angelini

10 Mar

Are Ontario’s Long-Term Care Facilities Ready for COVID-19?

Christina Canestraro Elder Law, Ethical Issues, General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News, News & Events, Public Policy Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

There’s a really good chance that if you live anywhere in the world that is not completely disconnected from the rest of society, you would have heard about COVID-19, and the fact that it has officially reached every single continent (except for Antarctica). The World Health Organization (WHO) has maintained that the containment of COVID-19 must be the top priority for all countries, given the impact it may have on public health, the economy and social and political issues.

Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness.

In a statement released on March 4, 2020, the WHO indicated “although COVID-19 presents an acute threat now, it is absolutely essential that countries do not lose this opportunity to strengthen their preparedness systems.”

In the US, nursing homes are being criticized for being incubators of epidemics, with relaxed infection-control practices and low staffing rates, among other issues.

The value of preparedness is being played out in a Seattle suburb, where COVID-19 has spread to a local nursing home, resulting in a quarantine of residents and staff.  In the US, nursing homes are being criticized for being incubators of epidemics, with relaxed infection-control practices and low staffing rates, among other issues. Friends and family of residents in this Seattle facility are in an unenviable position, worrying about the health and safety of their loved ones and considering the gut-wrenching possibility that their loved ones might die alone. To read more about this issue, click here.

With the number of confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 on the rise in Ontario, I wonder how our long-term facilities are preparing to deal with an outbreak should one occur?

 

In the spirit of prevention, it is important to consider reducing the frequency of visits with our elderly loved ones, and spreading knowledge and information about hand-washing and other preventative measures.

For more information about COVID-19, click the links below:

Government of Ontario: https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus

World Health Organization: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

Thanks for reading!

Christina Canestraro

09 Dec

A Call for Change in Toronto’s Long-Term Care Facilities

Christina Canestraro Elder Law Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

On December 4, 2019, the Economic and Community Development Committee considered a proposal to improve senior services and long-term care in the city of Toronto, which is set to be considered by City Council on December 17, 2019.

The proposal is based on a Report from the Interim General Manager, Seniors Services and Long-Term Care which recommends ways to improve life for residents in long-term care facilities. The proposal sheds light on certain shortcomings of the current institutional model of long-term care facilities. Under the current system, after tending to basic care needs such as eating, bathing, and safety, and ensuring that they have met government mandated reporting requirements, staff are left with little free time. As a result, residents spend the majority of their days alone, without any form of genuine human interaction or purpose.

The proposal will revamp and hopefully reinvigorate the city’s 10 long term care homes by shifting the model of care to one that is emotion-centred. The key components of an emotion-centred approach to care would see increased staffing (with up to 281 new staff by 2025), more hours of care per resident per day, increased funding from the provincial government, and improved bedding.

More importantly, an emotion-centred approach emphasizes the emotional needs of residents, understanding that human connection leads to enjoyment of life. The new approach is based wholly and substantively on an understanding of ageing, equity, diversity and intersectionality.

If adopted, the city of Toronto will be the first to integrate diversity, inclusion and equity directly and comprehensively into an emotion-centred approach to care framework.

If you are interested in learning more, read this article from the Toronto Star. I also recommend reading this 2018 Toronto Star series called “The Fix” about a bold initiative to change care in a dementia unit in a Peel nursing home.

Thanks for reading!

Christina Canestraro

19 Feb

Hull on Estates #566 – Residents’ Bill of Rights

76admin Estate & Trust, Hull on Estates, Podcasts Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, Stuart Clark and Doreen So discuss the Residents’ Bill of Rights within Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Stuart Clark.

Click here for more information on Doreen So.

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