Tag: jurisdiction

02 Apr

Alberta or British Columbia? Conflicts of Law Issues in a Guardianship Case

Kira Domratchev Capacity, Guardianship, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Court of Appeal of British Columbia (the “BCCA”) recently dealt with an appeal from an Order of the British Columbia Supreme Court which declined to exercise jurisdiction by staying a petition for guardianship of an incapable person. This Order also included various terms relating to the person’s care and property.

This appeal dealt with the guardianship of Ms. Dingwall, the mother of both the Appellant and the Respondent.

At all material times, Ms. Dingwall and the Appellant lived in Alberta and the Respondent resided in British Columbia. Between 2010 and 2014, Ms. Dingwall resided for various periods in both Alberta and British Columbia. At the time of this appeal, Ms. Dingwall lived in a care home in British Columbia. She suffered from advanced dementia.

The Alberta Proceedings

On February 5, 2015, the Appellant sought an Order from the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench appointing him as Ms. Dingwall’s guardian and trustee. The Respondent opposed this Order and in September, 2015 filed an Application to move the proceedings to British Columbia. This Application was never heard and the matter continued to be heard in Alberta.

On July 7, 2016, the Court granted the Order sought by the Appellant which appointed him as Ms. Dingwall’s guardian and provided him with the authority to make decisions with respect to Ms. Dingwall’s health care, the carrying on of any legal proceeding not related primarily to Ms. Dingwall’s financial matters and Ms. Dingwall’s personal and real property in Alberta.

The British Columbia Proceedings

A few weeks prior to the Alberta hearing, the Respondent filed a petition with the Supreme Court of British Columbia seeking a declaration that Ms. Dingwall was incapable of managing herself or her affairs due to mental infirmity and an Order appointing her as committee of Ms. Dingwall’s person and Estate. The Appellant opposed the Respondent’s petition by arguing that the Supreme Court of British Columbia lacked jurisdiction.

The Supreme Court of British Columbia asserted jurisdiction because Ms. Dingwall was at the time of the decision, ordinarily resident in British Columbia and because there was a “real and substantial” connection to British Columbia. The Court found that, in this case, both Alberta and British Columbia had jurisdiction.

Despite British Columbia having jurisdiction in this case, the Court found that the Alberta forum was nonetheless more appropriate and cited the following factors in favour of its decision:

  • The similarity of the proceedings;
  • Alberta having issued a final order; and
  • The Respondent having attorned to Alberta’s jurisdiction by opposing the Appellant’s petition.

As a result, the Court stayed the Respondent’s petition but also made several Orders respecting Ms. Dingwall’s care and property. The parties’ costs on a “solicitor client basis” were to be payable by Ms. Dingwall’s Estate.

The Appellant appealed the following Orders made by the Court, other than the stay of the Respondent’s proceedings:

  • issuing an Order on the matter after declining to exercise jurisdiction respecting it;
  • finding the Court had territorial competence over the matter; and
  • awarding solicitor-client costs payable from Ms. Dingwall’s Estate.

The BCCA Decision

The BCCA allowed the appeal and found that the lower Court erred in making Orders concerning the very matter over which it had declined to exercise jurisdiction. The Court noted that a decision to decline jurisdiction over a particular matter renders a judge incapable of deciding issues or making orders as to the substance of that matter.

As a result, the Court set aside the Orders respecting Ms. Dingwall’s care and property. In light of that finding, the Court of Appeal found it unnecessary to deal with the issue of whether British Columbia had territorial competence over this matter, given that the lower Court declined to exercise jurisdiction, in any event.

The Court of Appeal found that the Appellant was entitled to special costs payable by Ms. Dingwall’s Estate and that the Respondent was not entitled to costs.

The full decision can be found here: Pellerin v. Dingwall, 2018 BCCA 110

Thanks for reading.

Kira Domratchev

05 Sep

What jurisdiction governs the administration of an estate?

Stuart Clark Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In Tyrell v. Tyrell, 2017 ONSC 4063, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice was faced with a situation in which the testator died domiciled in Nevis, having drafted a Last Will and Testament which was executed in Nevis, which itself dealt with estate assets the vast majority of which were located in Nevis. The Will named the testator’s sister, who normally resided in Ontario, as Estate Trustee. Letters probate were issued to the Estate Trustee from the Nevis court following the testator’s death.

When concerns arose surrounding the Estate Trustee’s conduct following the testator’s death, certain of the beneficiaries brought an Application before the Ontario court seeking, amongst other things, the removal and replacement of the Estate Trustee, as well as an accounting from the Estate Trustee regarding the administration of the estate to date. The beneficiaries who brought such an Application were themselves located across several jurisdictions; being located in Nevis, Ontario, and New York.

In response to being served with the Application, the Estate Trustee took the position that the Ontario court was not the proper jurisdiction to seek such relief as against the Estate Trustee, maintaining that Nevis, being the jurisdiction in which the testator died domiciled, was the proper jurisdiction in which to adjudicate such disputes. The beneficiaries disagreed, arguing that the jurisdiction in which the Estate Trustee was normally resident was the proper jurisdiction in which such disputes should be adjudicated.

In ultimately agreeing with the beneficiaries, and ordering the Estate Trustee to complete certain steps regarding the administration of the estate within 60 days, the Ontario court provides the following commentary regarding Ontario’s jurisdiction over the matter:

For the purpose of administering the Will, the most significant connecting factor is the residence of the estate trustee. Therefore, the Will is most substantially connected to the province of Ontario and the applicable law on matters relating to the administration of the Will is the law of Ontario. Thus, the Courts of Ontario have jurisdiction over matters relating to the administration of the Will.” [emphasis added]

The court’s rationale in Tyrell v. Tyrell appears to be in contrast to the Alberta Court of Appeal’s previous decision in Re: Foote Estate, 2011 ABCA 1. Although Re: Foote Estate dealt with a determination of domicile for the purpose of deciding which jurisdiction’s laws would apply in the context of a dependant’s support case, the court provided general commentary regarding what jurisdiction’s laws governed the administration of an estate. Indeed, in the opening paragraph of the Court of Appeal’s decision in Re: Foote Estate, the following comment is made:

This appeal arises from a trial finding that the late Eldon Douglas Foote was domiciled on his death in Norfolk Island. The domicile of the deceased determines the applicable law for estate administration purposes.” [emphasis added]

Re: Foote Estate appears to suggest that it is testator’s domicile that determines which jurisdiction’s laws are to govern the administration of an estate, making no reference to the location of the Estate Trustee. Tyrell v. Tyrell appears to suggest the opposite, with the court concluding that, notwithstanding that the testator died domiciled in Nevis, the laws of Ontario governed the administration of the estate on account of the Estate Trustee being located in Ontario.

The contrasting decisions of Tyrell v. Tyrell and Re: Foote Estate likely leave more questions than answers. Whether the fact that Tyrell v. Tyrell is a decision of the Ontario court, while Re: Foote Estate is from Alberta (although from the Court of Appeal), could also potentially play a role. An interesting hypothetical would be what would happen if a testator died domiciled in Ontario with an Estate Trustee located in Alberta. In accordance with Tyrell v. Tyrell, notwithstanding that the testator died domiciled in Ontario, the laws of Alberta would apply to the administration of the estate on account of the location of the Estate Trustee. In accordance with Re: Foote Estate however, Alberta law dictates that it is the law of the jurisdiction in which the testator died domiciled which governs the administration of the estate, which could have Alberta send the matter back to Ontario. Confusion abounds.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

The Two Types of Domicile

A Piece of Estate Real Estate for Sale

Where is a Trust Resident?

24 Oct

Limited Grants Continued and Alterations in Grants

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Executors and Trustees, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Last week we blogged on limited grants in the event that the executor is located out of the jurisdiction. There are two other types of limited grants to consider: grants where an original will or codicil is unavailable and administration durante animi vitio. Furthermore, it is important to consider making alterations in grants in the case of an error.

Limited grants in terms of estate planning
“A limited grant may be necessary where an original testamentary document is unavailable or if there will be a delay in the production of certain codicils.”

A limited grant may be necessary where an original testamentary document is unavailable or if there will be a delay in the production of certain codicils. The grant may be limited until the time when the original or the codicils are produced. This grant will allow an individual to act as administrator of the estate until such documents can be located. If the original will is with somebody abroad who is unwilling to produce it, it is possible to grant probate pending the receipt of the original. In a case of urgency, it is possible that a copy of an original will may be admitted, limited until the original arrives. If a copy is admitted, an individual must apply to the court by an order for directions under Rule 75.06 of the Rules of Civil Procedure.

Another  type of limited grant is administration durante animi vitio, roughly translated as “administration for the use and benefit of a person under a disability”. If a person entitled to a grant of administration was of unsound mind at the time of the deceased’s death, or became of unsound mind after receiving the grant, administration for his or her use and benefit would be granted to someone else until the individual returned to sound mind. If a sole executor or administrator becomes incapacitated through mental or physical illness, the grant can be revoked and administration can be granted to his or her guardian.

If a certificate of appointment has been issued, but there is a defect in the document, it is important to alter or amend the document. If an error is a bona fide mistake and is not of significant importance to require the revocation of the grant, the amendments may be made based on satisfactory evidence. These types of amendments include minor details such as the name of the executor, or the date of death. This will result in the execution of a new bond. When an error is discovered, an affidavit should be filed confirming the mistake on the original and attesting to the correction, and the registrar will then make any changes required. If property is discovered after the grant of probate or administration and was not originally included in the application, the executor or administrator must deliver a true statement of the property verified by oath to the registrar in Ontario. This may result in the individual having to pay an increased surety to account for the extra value of property.

Thank you for reading,

Ian M. Hull

17 Oct

Limited Grants: Jurisdiction

Ian Hull Beneficiary Designations, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, Guardianship, In the News, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

There are a number of limited grants that are important to consider for succession planning purposes. We have previously blogged about a type of limited grant, a durante minore aetate, which grants administration duties to a guardian if a minor is named as executor of an estate. Other types of limited grants include administration durante absentia and grants to attorneys, both of which deal with administrators located outside of the jurisdiction.

Limited grants and how to deal with a person entitled to a certificate of appointment who is absent from the jurisdiction.
“A grant of administration durante absentia is a grant necessary where the person entitled to a certificate of appointment is absent from the jurisdiction.”

A grant of administration durante absentia is a grant necessary where the person entitled to a certificate of appointment is absent from the jurisdiction. The grant will be effective until the entitled individual returns to the jurisdiction. Today, these grants are made by passing over the absent individual and by appointing a person who the court sees as appropriate in the circumstances. The grant may last for longer than the named individual’s absence from jurisdiction.

A grant of administration durante absentia is usually made by the next of kin pursuant to section 13 of the Estates Act which states:

  1. Where application is made for letters of administration by a person not entitled to the same as next of kin of the deceased, an order shall be made requiring the next of kin, or others having or pretending interest in the property of the deceased, resident in Ontario, to show cause why the administration should not be granted to the person applying therefor; and if neither the next of kin nor any person of the kindred of the deceased resides in Ontario, a copy of the order shall be served or published in the manner prescribed by the rules of court.

This provision is further governed by Section 14 of the Estates Act which states:

  1. (1) If the next of kin, usually residing in Ontario and regularly entitled to administer, is absent from Ontario, the court having jurisdiction may grant a temporary administration to the applicant, or to such other person as the court thinks fit, for a limited time, or subject to be revoked upon the return of such next of kin to Ontario

(2) The administrator so appointed shall give such security as the court may direct, and has all the rights and powers of a general administrator, and is subject to the immediate control of  the court. R.S.O. 1990, c. E.21, s. 14 (2).

Furthermore, a grant to an attorney may be made if the person solely entitled to a grant as estate trustee with or without a will is out of the jurisdiction. Pursuant to section 5 of the Estates Act, letters of administration, except by resealing, can be granted only to a resident of Ontario. However, the case of Armstrong Estate, Re, 2010 ONSC 2275, held that if a non-resident is applying for a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee with a Will, and the applicant has the consent of a majority of the persons resident in Ontario who are otherwise entitled to apply, and where security is in place, the grant may be issued to the non-resident.

Thank you for reading,

Ian M. Hull

24 Mar

Dead but Not Gone

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, In the News Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

In any estates practice one is likely to see more than a few battles motivated by emotion rather than money. Take, for example, the not so unusual scenario of a younger woman who marries an older man and claims against his estate on his death. The son from a previous marriage, being the major beneficiary of the contested Will, vehemently denies the claim and a bitter dispute ensues. Not uncommon for such disputes to go on for years. In one US case, however, the dispute has outlived the husband, the wife and the son, leaving only the estates to battle it out after 15 years of litigation that saw its way into a Houston Probate Court, a Los Angeles Bankruptcy Court, a variety of appeal courts and even the US Supreme Court.

This, of course, is the Anna Nicole Smith (legal name Vickie Lynn Marshall) battle over her elderly husband’s $1.6 billion estate. Smith, a former stripper, and J. Howard Marshall, an oil tycoon, married in 1994 when she was a 26 and he was 89. Marshall died 14 months later.  In a Will that was re-done after his marriage to Smith, the elder Marshall left almost his entire estate to his son E. Pierce Marshall. 

Smith contested the Will in Probate Court in Texas at the same time as an appeal from her bankruptcy proceedings was pending in Federal Court in California.  As part of a counterclaim in the bankruptcy proceedings, Smith was awarded millions against Pierce for tortious interference with a substantial inter vivos gift (worth $300 Million) that she claimed her husband intended to give to her.   

In the latest decision  released on Friday, March 19, 2010, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found that the Probate Court’s decision that the billionaire was mentally competent and under no undue influence when he left nothing to Smith, was the earliest final judgment on matters relevant to the tort proceeding, which precluded the award of damages by the Federal Court.  For more on the background of this case see this 2007 blog.

Pierce Marshall passsed away in 2008.  His wife, Elaine Marshall, continues the battle on behalf of his estate with Smith’s ex-boyfriend, Larry Birkhead, and attorney, Howard K. Stern, in charge of Smith’s estate. Birkhead and Smith’s 3-year-old daughter, Dannielynn, was named Smith’s heir in 2008 after she died of a drug overdose at age 39 in a Florida hotel.

Whether emotion will continue to fuel the litigation remains to be seen but this article in the Washington Post seems to indicate that it is not over yet, with another trip to the US Supreme Court possible in the future.

Thanks for reading!

Sharon Davis

Sharon Davis – Click here for more information on Sharon Davis.

04 Jun

The Decision of Justice Brown – Hull on Estates #165

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to The Decision of Justice Brown

This week on Hull on Estates, Ian Hull and Suzana Popovic-Montag discuss the recent decision of Re Pearsall.

In this decision, Justice Brown offers clarification on the issue of where applications involving estates may be commenced.

Paul Trudelle has  previously written a post about the decision.

If you have any comments, send us an email at hull.lawyers@gmail.com or leave a comment on our blog.

 

22 Apr

A Will Challenge under the Indian Act

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In keeping with yesterday’s blog on a British Columbia real estate matter, today I focus on another BC case – Albas v. Gabriel 2009 BCSC 198 – that involves the Indian Act, a federal statute. 

For a quick recap of the interplay between provincial and federal jurisdiction regarding estate matters and First Nations people living on reserves, I refer to David Smith’s 2007 blog: The Administration of Estates under the Indian Act. 

Albas v. Gabriel involved an action by the plaintiff, as executor of the estate, for a declaration proving the deceased’s Will in solemn form.  The defendant beneficiaries appealed to the Minister of Northern and Indian Affairs because the Minister has jurisdiction to approve a Will made by an Indian and to confirm the appointment of an executor to administer the estate. Specificially, the Minister’s authority is provided by section 43 of the Indian Act.

A member of an Indian Band and a resident of a reserve, the deceased operated a trailer park and he was a “locatee” of the land because he owned “certificates of possession”: valuable assets that he left equally to his daughter and two step-children. This was just one of the businesses with which the deceased was involved.

The daughter challenged both the validity of the Will and the administration of the estate. The judge determined that the daughter believed that if the Will was declared invalid, she would inherit the entire estate.

Because of the Will challenge, the Minister transferred jurisdiction over the estate to the Supreme Court of British Columbia pursuant to s. 44(1).

Ultimately, the Court found that the Will was valid because it was not forged and the testator had capacity as well as knowledge of the Will which he approved.

Enjoy your day.

Jonathan

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