Tag: Guardian of Person

02 Apr

Alberta or British Columbia? Conflicts of Law Issues in a Guardianship Case

Kira Domratchev Capacity, Guardianship, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Court of Appeal of British Columbia (the “BCCA”) recently dealt with an appeal from an Order of the British Columbia Supreme Court which declined to exercise jurisdiction by staying a petition for guardianship of an incapable person. This Order also included various terms relating to the person’s care and property.

This appeal dealt with the guardianship of Ms. Dingwall, the mother of both the Appellant and the Respondent.

At all material times, Ms. Dingwall and the Appellant lived in Alberta and the Respondent resided in British Columbia. Between 2010 and 2014, Ms. Dingwall resided for various periods in both Alberta and British Columbia. At the time of this appeal, Ms. Dingwall lived in a care home in British Columbia. She suffered from advanced dementia.

The Alberta Proceedings

On February 5, 2015, the Appellant sought an Order from the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench appointing him as Ms. Dingwall’s guardian and trustee. The Respondent opposed this Order and in September, 2015 filed an Application to move the proceedings to British Columbia. This Application was never heard and the matter continued to be heard in Alberta.

On July 7, 2016, the Court granted the Order sought by the Appellant which appointed him as Ms. Dingwall’s guardian and provided him with the authority to make decisions with respect to Ms. Dingwall’s health care, the carrying on of any legal proceeding not related primarily to Ms. Dingwall’s financial matters and Ms. Dingwall’s personal and real property in Alberta.

The British Columbia Proceedings

A few weeks prior to the Alberta hearing, the Respondent filed a petition with the Supreme Court of British Columbia seeking a declaration that Ms. Dingwall was incapable of managing herself or her affairs due to mental infirmity and an Order appointing her as committee of Ms. Dingwall’s person and Estate. The Appellant opposed the Respondent’s petition by arguing that the Supreme Court of British Columbia lacked jurisdiction.

The Supreme Court of British Columbia asserted jurisdiction because Ms. Dingwall was at the time of the decision, ordinarily resident in British Columbia and because there was a “real and substantial” connection to British Columbia. The Court found that, in this case, both Alberta and British Columbia had jurisdiction.

Despite British Columbia having jurisdiction in this case, the Court found that the Alberta forum was nonetheless more appropriate and cited the following factors in favour of its decision:

  • The similarity of the proceedings;
  • Alberta having issued a final order; and
  • The Respondent having attorned to Alberta’s jurisdiction by opposing the Appellant’s petition.

As a result, the Court stayed the Respondent’s petition but also made several Orders respecting Ms. Dingwall’s care and property. The parties’ costs on a “solicitor client basis” were to be payable by Ms. Dingwall’s Estate.

The Appellant appealed the following Orders made by the Court, other than the stay of the Respondent’s proceedings:

  • issuing an Order on the matter after declining to exercise jurisdiction respecting it;
  • finding the Court had territorial competence over the matter; and
  • awarding solicitor-client costs payable from Ms. Dingwall’s Estate.

The BCCA Decision

The BCCA allowed the appeal and found that the lower Court erred in making Orders concerning the very matter over which it had declined to exercise jurisdiction. The Court noted that a decision to decline jurisdiction over a particular matter renders a judge incapable of deciding issues or making orders as to the substance of that matter.

As a result, the Court set aside the Orders respecting Ms. Dingwall’s care and property. In light of that finding, the Court of Appeal found it unnecessary to deal with the issue of whether British Columbia had territorial competence over this matter, given that the lower Court declined to exercise jurisdiction, in any event.

The Court of Appeal found that the Appellant was entitled to special costs payable by Ms. Dingwall’s Estate and that the Respondent was not entitled to costs.

The full decision can be found here: Pellerin v. Dingwall, 2018 BCCA 110

Thanks for reading.

Kira Domratchev

06 Oct

Compensation & Personal Care Guardians

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Welcome to my week of blogs.

The Substitute Decisions Act is silent when it comes to the issue of compensation for personal care guardians. Section 40 of the SDA addresses compensation for property guardians, but there is no corresponding provision for personal care guardians (though regard can be had to section 68(4) of the SDA). 

 

I was recently before Brown, J. in Toronto Estates Court in respect of a request for compensation by a personal care guardian (the decision is not yet reported). The property guardian, who I represented, supported the request for compensation, but the PGT questioned the amount requested and wondered whatever happened to “natural love and affection”.

 

In coming to his decision, Brown, J. applied the analysis set out in Cheney v. Bryrne, which he found was applicable to claims for compensation by personal care guardians. Brown, J. also applied, by analogy, the approach applied by the court to claims for compensation by property guardians. The test regarding the reasonableness of compensation claims was set out in Re: Brown (1999), 31 E.T.R. (2d) 164 (link not available). 

 

According to Brown, J., the evidence before him clearly demonstrated that the incapable needed the services provided by the personal care guardian. He was also satisfied that the personal care guardian was providing the services to the incapable with care and devotion and that her services were of a high quality and went well beyond what was ordinarily expected. Moreover, the incapable obviously could afford to pay for the services (not an insignificant factor). In considering the level of compensation, Brown, J. was satisfied that the amount claimed was reasonable and in the best interests of the incapable. He therefore approved the compensation claimed.

 

Thanks for reading. 

 

Justin

07 May

When Living Wills Attack

Hull & Hull LLP Elder Law, Estate & Trust, Ethical Issues, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Who can forget the sad case of Terry Schiavo, the poor lady who suffered catastrophic brain damage in 1990 and was kept alive in a vegetative state on a feeding tube for 15 years?  Readers will remember the anguish involved when her husband was forced to litigate against her parents in order to get the tube removed so Terry could die in peace.  This became a powerful argument in favour of a "Living Will", which is basically a document in which individuals outline their "personal choices" regarding end-of-life treatments.  Living Wills became a feel-good legal product, a perceived solution to the heart-rending situations like Terry’s.

Too bad the research shows that Living Wills may not live up to the hype.  According to a recent study by two University of California Irvine researchers, Professors Peter Ditto and Elizabeth Loftus, Living Wills appear to have serious defects.  One problem is that patient preferences change over time.  For instance, one tends to be more inclined against end-of-life treatments immediately after a hospital stay, but this changes with time.  Also, positive treatment results of family members make a patient more inclined to end-of-life treatment.  Many people who make Living Wills change their preferences but forget about their Living Will, or misidentify those preferences in the Living Will. 

Perhaps the most glaring weakness is that Living Wills do not appear to provide guidance  to surrogates who have read them.  According to the study, the accuracy of a surrogate who has read a Living Will in prediciting a loved one’s treatment preferences is no higher than that of a surrogate who has not read the Living Will.  So a Living Will can be totally inconsistent with the patient’s most recent intentions.   

Having a Living Will apparently makes both the patients and the surrogates feel better, so it’s not all bad news. 

Have a safe day,

Chris Graham

 

15 Nov

Frustrated and Marginalized

Hull & Hull LLP Archived BLOG POSTS - Hull on Estates, Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In our rapidly aging society, powers of attorney for personal care and property are now widespread and their importance is recognized by the general public. A family member or friend can also apply to the court to be appointed guardian of the person or the person’s property if powers of attorney have not been executed. However, family members often find themselves in a situation where a loved one is being legally cared for by a family member, or friend of the incapable person, who they no longer like or trust. 

A common complaint that I hear is from family members or friends who feel excluded from participating in or influencing decisions regarding the incapable person, particularly when it comes to personal care.  

However, under the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, which generally governs the rights of an incapable person, any person, with leave, can seek directions from the court on any question arising under a power of attorney (the same is true regarding a court appointed guardian). Pursuant to sections 39 and 68 of the Act, the court may give such directions as it considers to be for the benefit of the incapable person and consistent with the Act.

Section 66(1) of the Act sets out the duties of an attorney for personal care (section 32 is the corresponding section for an attorney for property). In general, the attorney is required to exercise his or her duties and powers with diligence and in good faith. 

Section 66(6) also states that an attorney must foster regular personal contact between the incapable person and supportive family members and friends. Moreover, section 66(7) states that the attorney shall consult with supportive family members and friends who are in regular contact with the incapable person, as well as the incapable person’s caregivers. 

The requirements of section 66, coupled with the ability to seek directions from the court, offer family members and friends the means to ensure that they remain involved with their loved ones and are not simply sidelined. Proceeding to court is always expensive. However, where there is genuine concern and frustration that the incapable person is not being properly cared for and/or his or her finances are being squandered, recourse can be had to the courts.

Ciao!

Justin

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