Tag: Genetics

10 Jan

Home DNA Tests – What’s an Estate Trustee to do when there is an unexpected result?

Stuart Clark Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently blogged about the growing use of home DNA tests and what impact an unexpected result could have upon your rights as a beneficiary of an estate. While such a blog was from the perspective of an individual who discovered through a home DNA test that their biological father was not in fact the individual they previously believed it to be, and the potential impact such a finding could have upon their status as a beneficiary of their “father’s” estate if their interest was based on their status as a “child”, questions would also emerge in such a scenario if you were the Estate Trustee of such an estate regarding what you should do.

If you are the Estate Trustee of an estate in which a bequest is based on parentage (i.e. an intestacy or a bequest to a testator’s “issue” or “children”), and you discover that one of the beneficiaries has voluntarily taken a home DNA test which revealed that they were not in fact related to the deceased, could you still make a distribution to such a beneficiary? If you have already made a distribution to such a beneficiary, is there a risk that the other beneficiaries could now make a claim against you as Estate Trustee, alleging that you distributed the estate to the incorrect individuals and that they have suffered damages as a result?

In response to whether an Estate Trustee could potentially be liable to the other beneficiaries for historically paying out amounts to a beneficiary who it is later discovered was not actually related to the deceased, it would appear that the Estate Trustee likely would not be liable under such a scenario. In my previous blog I discussed the provisions of the Children’s Law Reform Act (the “CLRA“) which establish a person’s legal parentage in Ontario, and the various presumptions establishing an individual’s father. While sections 13(1) and 14(1) of the CLRA allow the court to make a subsequent different declaration as to a person’s parentage, section 14(2) of the CLRA provides that such an Order “does not affect rights and duties that were exercised or performed, or interests in property that were distributed, before the order was set aside“. As a result, it would appear, arguably, that if an Estate Trustee historically made a payment to an individual based off of parentage, and a subsequent declaration is made by the court that the individual in question was not actually the parent of the beneficiary, the historic payment to the beneficiary could not be put in issue or reclaimed provided that at the time the payment was made the beneficiary was still presumed and/or declared to be the child of the deceased.

The issue of what an Estate Trustee is to do if a payment has not yet been made and they discover that an individual who they previously believed to be a beneficiary is not in fact related to the deceased could be more complicated. In the event that the other beneficiaries who could be affected by the distribution do not unanimously consent to continue to allow the distribution to the individual notwithstanding the results of the DNA test, it is possible that one or all of the other beneficiaries may later bring a claim against the Estate Trustee for negligence, alleging that the Estate Trustee knew about the results of the DNA test before making the distribution and that they have suffered damages as a result of the distribution. To offset such a risk, it may be wise for the Estate Trustee in such a scenario to bring an Application for the opinion, advice and direction of the court pursuant to section 60(1) of the Trustee Act and/or rule 14.05, asking the court to determine whether the distribution may still be made to the potential beneficiary in light of the results of the home DNA test.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

31 Dec

Elder Law Implications of Genetic Testing

Nick Esterbauer Capacity, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently read an article by Gregory Wilcox and Rachel Koff, which was published in the fall 2015 edition of the Journal for the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, that explores the use of genetic testing and counselling within the context of elder law.

The article describes the three uses of genetic testing as disease diagnosis, determining carrier status, and predictive testing.  Historically, genetic counsellors were required to rely upon basic Mendelian genetics that did not often reveal whether someone would eventually suffer from a certain delayed-onset disease. Because of recent developments, however, science now allows accuracy in determining whether a person will suffer (or be more likely to suffer) from a variety of medical conditions.  For example, the development of breast and ovarian cancer has been linked to the BRCA1 gene mutation, which can be tested for and discovered in time for adjuvant medical intervention.

Genetic testing is now capable of revealing whether a person may be especially susceptible to conditions that are often associated with aging, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, and cancer.  However, to date, there is limited data confirming that individuals who are determined to be at a higher risk of developing a disease like Alzheimer’s actually do receive an eventual diagnosis at higher rates than the general population.  As a result of learning that one is at a higher-than-average risk of developing such a condition, lifestyle changes may be made in an effort to reduce the chances that an increased genetic risk is eventually expressed through the onset of the disease.

Perceived risk of developing a disease that may compromise mental capacity or shorten life expectancy may serve as motivation to obtain assistance in creating comprehensive incapacity and estate plans at an earlier life stage than these considerations might otherwise be made.  As the year ends, no matter current health status or perceived risk of developing certain diseases in the future, it is important to take the time to ensure that incapacity and estate plans are put into place and to keep those plans updated following any material change in family situation.

Happy New Year!

Nick Esterbauer

06 Nov

Chimerism and Estates

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Health / Medical, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Doreen So recently wrote about Howard W. Jones and how the developments that he made in reproductive technologies have the potential to impact estate planning and intestacy laws.  An issue encountered in recent news may give rise to further uncertainty when it comes to the estates of individuals conceiving and being conceived through assisted reproductive technologies.

An article appearing in the Hamilton Spectator tells the story of how the paternity of a child conceived in vitro in Washington recently caused considerable confusion.  After their baby had been born, the couple questioned whether the wrong sperm sample had been used, as the child’s blood-type was inconsistent with those of its parents.  After this discrepancy came to light, the couple arranged for a DNA test to be conducted.  The testing confirmed that the sperm donor and intended father was not a biological parent of the baby.  Surprisingly, the results of the DNA testing revealed that the man was (biologically, at least) the baby’s uncle.

A geneticist at Stanford University investigated the situation and determined that the cause for the unplanned degree of relatedness between the mother’s husband and their child was a what is known as a chimera, rather than an error made at the fertility clinic.

Chimerism, also known as the “vanishing twin effect”, occurs when two zygotes fuse into one, which is estimated to occur in as many as one out of eight pregnancies.  The fusion of two twins results in one embryo that may consist of DNA derived from both zygotes.  In this specific case in Washington, some of the sperm donor father’s germline cells, being those that have the capacity to develop into eggs or sperm, were derived from his unborn fraternal twin.  As a result, 90% of the man’s sperm contains his own DNA and the other 10% contains the genetic material of his “brother”, giving rise to the ability of the man to father his own genetic nephew or niece.  The article reports that the man has another child, in addition to the newborn, who is, in fact, his biological child.

The incidence of chimerism, which is believed to be increasing with prospective parents more frequently obtaining assistance from fertility clinics, further complicates the issue of entitlement to a biological parent’s estate on intestacy and qualification as a member of a class identified within testamentary documents.  It will be interesting to observe how the case law may develop to address these issues.

Thank you for reading and have a great weekend.

Nick Esterbauer

10 Sep

Inheriting from Long-Lost Relatives – Part 2

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

On Tuesday, I introduced the idea of receiving an inheritance from a long-lost relative who dies intestate.  While the law allows distantly-related next of kin to benefit from a deceased intestate, in reality, practical barriers often present themselves.

When trying to assert one’s position as a very distantly-related next of kin, the challenge may become proving (or, in some cases, disproving) the relationship.  It can be difficult or impossible to establish someone who was not recognized as a close relative of the deceased as the next of kin, absent DNA evidence.

In determining the degree of relatedness of one individual to another, geneticists use math models and averages.  However, when DNA analyses are done, our genetic materials do not always follow expectations based on mathematical trends.  For this reason, DNA test results may be inaccurate or inconclusive, suggesting that two individuals are more or less closely related than they actually are.  What makes the ability to rely on genetic testing more difficult is the fact that fourth cousins (and beyond) often share no more genetic material than that shared with any other member of the population.

Another difficulty that may present itself in determining the relatedness of one person with another who is deceased is that DNA testing requires a sample (such as hair or saliva) from both test subjects.  If the deceased has been cremated, a tissue sample may not exist at the time that the purported family member seeks evidence of their relatedness.

In Ontario, genetic testing can be used to support or dispute familial relatedness within the context of estate litigation.  The Court can order a DNA test to disprove genetic relatedness of a purported beneficiary on intestacy under Rule 33 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, which allows the mental or physical examination of a party whose condition is in question in a proceeding.  In Kelly Estate (Trustee of) v. Kelly, Justice Coats of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice granted leave for DNA testing of one party, an alleged daughter of the deceased, stating that “DNA testing is a highly reliable method of determining parentage.”

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

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