Tag: financial planning

21 Feb

What you should do when “unexpected” financial news is good

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

The financial industry is relentless in encouraging Canadians to “plan for the unexpected” – and highlighting how anything can happen. You could lose your job, become disabled, lose your home to a fire, lose a loved one – the list of possible bad news seems endless.

The solutions that the industry is pushing – emergency funds, insurance, retirement savings – are all smart choices, and it’s important to have protections against bad news in place. But what about the good news? Do we need a plan of action when happy financial events occur?

The answer is absolutely. But luckily, your actions can take place after the good news. Unlike the bad news event, no advance planning is required.

Unexpected good financial news can come in many forms: an inheritance, large gift, work bonus or promotion, or a rapid rise in the value of shares that you own. And if you experience financial good fortune, it’s important to integrate the unexpected additional assets into your financial plan.

For example, with a more secure financial base, you may be more comfortable with investment risk, and more willing to adopt a more aggressive investment strategy to enhance your long-term returns. Conversely, if your savings are already aggressively invested to achieve your retirement goals, the additional wealth may allow you to structure a more moderate risk portfolio.

If you are currently retired, financial good fortune can also affect your retirement income strategy. If you draw on your new funds to meet your immediate cashflow needs, you’ll be able to withdraw less taxable income from your registered plans – and this could significantly lower the taxes you pay.

Of course, the most unexpected – and most unlikely – piece of good financial news is what nine Montreal co-workers received around Christmas: a $60 million lottery win, representing nearly $7 million each. The group seemed surprisingly tight-lipped in the press reports, not even disclosing where they worked. But you definitely get a sense that this is a savvy group who will plan well.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/group-of-montreal-colleagues-wins-60-million-lotto-max-jackpot/article37437149/

And while the article below contains advice for a lottery win, it really applies to any financial windfall.

https://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/spending_saving/2016/01/26/the-five-things-to-do-after-you-win-the-lottery.html

Enough of the bad news – here’s to good financial fortune for you in 2018.

Thank you for reading,
Ian Hull

26 Jan

The American Fiduciary Rule

Nick Esterbauer In the News, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Beginning April 10, 2017, the United States Department of Labour will implement what is being referred to as the “Fiduciary Rule“.  The Fiduciary Rule will require American investment advisors to satisfy a higher standard of care when providing investment recommendations, putting clients’ interests above their own and providing complete disclosure with respect to fees and potential conflicts of interest.

The standard of fiduciary, premised on a role of trust and the duty to act in utmost good faith, is applied to guardians of property and the person, attorneys of property and personal care for incapable grantors, estate trustees, and other types of trustees.  While commentary regarding the Fiduciary Rule recognizes that investment advisors should be (and often are) already guided by the best interests of investor clients, some who earn commission on the sale of certain products may be in a position of conflict.  The Fiduciary Rule will prevent advisors from making certain recommendations if they are not in the client’s best interests.  The new standard of care required of American investment advisors may to some extent fall short of that applied in respect of other traditional fiduciaries, and is subject to a number of exceptions.

Absent the implementation of the Fiduciary Rule or equivalent requirements in other jurisdictions, investment advisors are not typically treated as fiduciaries.  Contracts may specifically state that advisors are not acting in a fiduciary role and that they do not absorb risk on their clients’ behalf related to investment advice that is followed.  Typically, if something goes wrong and an investor wishes to pursue a claim against his or her advisor, the onus is on the investor to prove the fiduciary nature of the relationship.  If the investor is able to prove that a fiduciary obligation existed (factors include the length of the relationship, the sophistication of the client, and the demonstrated reliance on the advice of the advisor), the advisor must then show that he or she has discharged the duty in good faith and with full disclosure.

Although the Fiduciary Rule is scheduled to come into effect on April 10 of this year, it is anticipated that the new Trump administration may delay the applicability of the Fiduciary Rule for the time being.  Although there have been discussions with respect to raising the standard of care of investment advisors in Canada, where extensive regulations already apply, an equivalent to the U.S. Fiduciary Rule has not yet been introduced.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that you may enjoy reading:

17 Mar

Hull on Estates #410 – Volunteering with Junior Achievement of Canada

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Hull on Estates #410 – Volunteering with Junior Achievement of Canada

This week on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Nick Esterbauer discuss their experience volunteering with Junior Achievement of Canada and the importance of teaching youth about financial planning.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com, or leave a comment on our blog page.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Nick Esterbauer.

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