Tag: fiduciary duty

11 Jun

No Junkets: Estate Trustee Expenses

Paul Emile Trudelle Executors and Trustees, Funerals Tags: , , 0 Comments

Disposing of the body is a fundamental responsibility of an estate trustee, and an estate trustee is entitled to be reimbursed from the estate for legitimate and reasonable funeral expenses. In considering what is “reasonable”, the court will consider the deceased’s “station in life”, and other circumstances, such as any direction from the deceased in the will or otherwise, the size of the estate, and cultural and religious beliefs, practices and traditions: see Chernichan v. Chernichan (Estate), a decision of the Queen’s Bench of Alberta.

In Zaradic Estate (Re), the Supreme Court of British Columbia disallowed an estate expense of $11,525.01 claimed by the two estate trustees for a trip to Croatia to deliver and scatter the deceased’s cremated remains. There was no specific provision in the will directing that the remains be taken to Croatia. However, the will did provide that the executors could incur expenses in relation to the deceased’s funeral. The executors also gave evidence, which was accepted by the court, that the deceased wanted his remains taken to Croatia. However, the court held that there was no justification for BOTH estate trustees to travel to Croatia. Therefore, only half of the cost of the trip was allowed.

(In Zaradic, the estate trustees, who were friends of the deceased, were also denied executor compensation. Although the will provided that they could claim compensation in the amount of 10% of the value of the estate, the court held that their actions disqualified them from receiving any compensation. The estate trustees had attempted to sell the deceased’s residence to their daughter at a price well below market value. The residual beneficiary commenced litigation in order to stop the proposed improvident sale. “The actions of the executors were an egregious breach of their fiduciary duty. If they had been successful, the beneficiary would have been swindled out of 50% of the estate’s value, and the executor’s (sic) daughter, their only child, would have thereby profited. … the actions of the executors are sufficiently egregious to disentitle them to any fee.”)

In The Estate of George Francis Perkins, the estate trustee claimed payment for airfare for his son and daughter-in-law (the deceased’s grandson and granddaughter-in-law) to travel to the deceased’s funeral. The court disallowed half of this expense, stating that it was unreasonable for the estate to pay for BOTH tickets, in light of the small size of the estate.

Where expenses are incurred for funeral and burial related matters, the beneficiaries of the estate will examine these closely, and the courts will likely disallow anywhere there is a hint of unreasonableness, or where it appears that the estate trustees were unfairly taking advantage of their position at the expense of the estate.

Have a great weekend.

Paul Trudelle

02 Nov

When can a Trustee Purchase Trust Property?

Rebecca Rauws Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Broadly speaking, a trustee cannot personally profit from his or her role as a trustee. “Profit” can mean a variety of things. One way in which a trustee could potentially profit from a trust is through the purchase of trust property.

A trustee may not purchase trust assets unless there is an express power in the Will or trust instrument allowing a trustee to do so, or if the purchase is approved by the court. Even where a trustee has the express power to purchase trust assets, he or she must still act in accordance with his or her fiduciary obligations to the beneficiaries of the trust or estate. Additionally, a trustee who has been authorized to purchase trust assets would be well-advised to obtain consents and releases from the beneficiaries, or to consider seeking court approval in any event, given that such a situation is ripe for claims that the trustee breached his or her fiduciary duty.

The court should only approve the sale of trust property to a trustee where the sale is clearly to the advantage of the beneficiaries. Demonstrating that a sale is clearly advantageous to the beneficiaries can be difficult, as it is not enough to just show that the purchase price is fair. For instance, even if a trustee has offered a fair price, if there is another purchaser who is willing to purchase the asset for a greater price, the trustee’s purchase will not be to the advantage of the beneficiaries.

The problem with a trustee purchasing trust assets is that in doing so, he or she is practically putting him or herself in an irreconcilable conflict of interest: the trustee has a duty to maximize the value of the trust assets for the beneficiaries, but in his or her personal capacity, will want to minimize the price paid for an asset. A trustee seeking to purchase trust property will need to ensure that he or she has taken sufficient steps to satisfy the court that he or she has maximized the value of the asset.

In Re Ballard Estate, (1993) 20 O.R. (3d) 189, a trustee, S, obtained certain option rights to purchase trust property. The trustees obtained two valuations of the property in question, and S and the other trustees negotiated a purchase price for the property in question at the upper end of the range of values pursuant to the valuations. However, the property was not offered for sale on the open market, and the trustees did not take steps to identify other potential purchasers. The court found that the trustees could have done more to ensure the maximum value was obtained for the asset, stating that the trustees should have taken “all reasonable positive steps to ferret out the best price”. Trustees cannot avoid their obligation to maximize the value of the assets by taking a passive stance and hoping that other potential purchasers will find them.

Thanks for reading,

Rebecca Rauws

 

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03 Sep

Caregivers & Fiduciary Obligations

Hull & Hull LLP Capacity, Estate & Trust, Health / Medical, Joint Accounts, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Reeves v. Dean, a recent decision of the Supreme Court of British Columbia (BCSC), acts as a helpful reminder that a fiduciary relationship may arise between a caregiver and their client.

The plaintiff was 50 years old and suffered from developmental delays making her unable to independently manage her finances.  The defendant was the plaintiff’s caregiver pursuant to a contract of services between the defendant and the Provincial Government.  The plaintiff sought damages based on, amongst other things, breach of fiduciary duty arising from the misappropriation of monies arising from a joint account between the plaintiff and defendant.

The decision of Ben-Israel v. Vitacare Medical Products Inc. (ON SC) provides a helpful summary of the traditional categories of relationship in which a fiduciary duty exists: agent to principal; lawyer to client; trustee to beneficiary; business partner to partner; and, director to corporation.  In addition, as set out in the Supreme Court of Canada decision in Lac Minerals v. International Resources, relationships in which a fiduciary obligation have been imposed appear to possess three general characteristics:

  1. The fiduciary has scope for the exercise of some discretion or power;
  2. The fiduciary can unilaterally exercise that power or discretion so as to affect the beneficiary’s legal or practical interests; and
  3. The beneficiary is peculiarly vulnerable to, or at the mercy of, the fiduciary holding the discretion or power.

Of the three characteristics, the BCSC found that it was the vulnerability of the client that was essential to a finding of a fiduciary relationship.  As such, since the plaintiff was in a position of disadvantage regarding the administration of the joint account monies, and consequently placed her trust in the defendant, a fiduciary relationship was found to exist between the plaintiff and defendant.

Therefore, the plaintiff was entitled to rely on the remedies available for breach of fiduciary duty including constructive trust, accounting for profits, and equitable compensation to restore to the plaintiff what was lost.

Noah Weisberg

24 Aug

Fiduciary Relationships

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

We hear a lot about fiduciary duty in the practice of wills and estates. But what is it exactly? According to this definition in Irwin law’s online dictionary, a fiduciary is “a person occupying a position of trust vis-à-vis another person”.

In the recent case of Hooper (Estate) v. Hooper, 2011 ONSC 4140, the court discusses the concept of fiduciary duty.  In Hooper, the estate trustee, who did not defend the proceedings against him, placed himself in a fiduciary relationship with respect to not only the deceased, but also in relation to the other named beneficiaries. 

The court commented that when a person in such a fiduciary position fails to pass accounts or otherwise account for his or her actions, he or she can be required to repay the amount unaccounted for to the estate. Breach of such a special relationship gives rise to wide array of equitable remedies.  Such equitable remedies are always subject to the discretion of the court, and are designed to address not only fairness between the parties, but also the public concern about the maintenance of the integrity of fiduciary relationships.

In exercising its equitable discretion, the court is concerned not only with compensating a wronged plaintiff, but also with upholding the obligations of good faith and loyalty, which are the cornerstone of the concept of fiduciary duty. 

The freedom of the fiduciary is limited by the nature of the obligation he or she undertakes, an obligation which “betokens loyalty, good faith and avoidance of a conflict of duty in self interest.”  In short, equity is concerned not only to compensate the plaintiff, but to enforce the trust which is at its heart.

Fiduciary duties are clearly those which should never be entered into lightly or on an uninformed basis.

Sharon Davis – Click here for more information on Sharon Davis

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