Tag: exercise

29 Aug

How can we slow down aging?

Nick Esterbauer Elder Law, Health / Medical, In the News Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

There are constantly new studies suggesting different ways to slow both physical and mental aging.  This month alone, the news has featured research suggesting the following:

  • Aging with pets in place can increase life satisfaction overall, and research suggests that pets may be associated not only with less loneliness, stronger social support systems, and increased participation in the community, but also better cardiovascular health, lower cholesterol, and lower blood pressure.
  • A study from the University of Leeds suggests that tickling may slow down aging.  The study involved the use of electrodes on the participants’ ears to simulate a tickle-like tingling sensation.  Two weeks of 15-minute daily tickling therapy were believed to improve the balance of the autonomic nervous system.
  • People who are optimistic may live longer.  For groups of both women and men, those who were optimistic long-term had a better chance of living to age 85 (and beyond).  Optimism has been linked with goal-setting and healthier habits and, accordingly, fewer optimistic people are believe to die prematurely from stroke, heart disease, or cancer.
  • Consistent with previous research, a new study by the University of Iowa has linked exercise to a healthy aging brain.  Even a single bout of exercise was considered to improve cognitive function and working memory in older participants.

While there may be nothing to prevent aging altogether and/or to totally eliminate the risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or other age-related cognitive decline (absent any major scientific breakthrough), in general, taking health and wellness more seriously from an earlier age may improve quality of life and independence down the road.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

25 May

Six Proven Ways to Prevent Dementia

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Health / Medical, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

A recent report on the healthista.com website discusses ways to avoid or slow the progress of dementia.

First, the bad news: In the UK, one person is diagnosed with dementia every three minutes. One in twenty people develop dementia under 65, and after turning 65, a person’s risk of developing dementia doubles every five years.

Now the good news: there are various things that we can do to reduce the risk of developing dementia. These include:

  1. Stimulate your brain. This means doing more than “brain training”. Social interaction is seen as the key. Also, taking up new hobbies, interests and intellectual challenges is more beneficial than doing the things that you have always done.
  2. Develop a “cognitive reserve”. A high cognitive reserve, based on higher education, a complex lifetime occupation and high levels of social engagement helps maintain brain health. Lawyers, social workers, teachers and doctors were better protected from Alzheimer’s than shelf-stackers, machine operators and labourers.
  3. Take Aspirin. Long term use of aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s. Low doses of aspirin, traditionally associated with heart health, was found to lead to better memory and cognitive function.
  4. Take fish oil. This one is a bit controversial. Some studies have shown that fish oil slows the decline of cognitive function. However, a Cleveland Clinic post has suggested the research is not conclusive on the benefits of fish oil, and suggests that you should simply eat more fish.
  5. Help your heart, help your brain. The same processes that cause heart attacks and strokes are also associated with the development of dementia. Conversely, the lifestyle factors that help your heart can also help maintain cognitive function.
  6. Drink, eat and exercise. Drink champagne: one to three glasses a week. The phenolic compounds found in the grapes used to make champagne have the ability to increase spatial memory, improve cognitive function and promote learning and memory retention. Further, regular moderate exercise can prevent the onset of dementia. Even better is engaging in a sport, as this adds a social element, as well. Finally, a healthy diet, such as the Mediterranean diet, has been found by a number of studies to slow cognitive decline and lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

More good news: in the next ten years, it is expected that research will reveal more specific actions that can help prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Have a great weekend.
Paul Trudelle

23 Mar

Need Another Reason To Exercise? Here are 14

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Health / Medical, In the News, Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments

We all know exercise is good for you. However, a survey of recent studies compiled by Business Insider shows that it is really, really good for you.

The article confirms that the best sort of exercise is aerobic exercise, or “cardio”. Exercises that increase the heart rate have been shown to be the most beneficial for body and mind.

The article refers to various studies showing the diverse ways in which cardio can be beneficial. These include:

  1. lower the risk of dementia;
  2. protection of your immune system from age-related decline;
  3. increased muscle tone;
  4. improved heart and lung health;
  5. the reversal of some heart damage associated with aging;
  6. improved mood and reduced stress;
  7. change the microbial makeup of your gut, reducing inflammation;
  8. the lowering of bad cholesterol levels;
  9. prevention or management of diabetes;
  10. improved look and feel of your skin;
  11. reduction of the symptoms of depression
  12. increased brain connectivity, thereby reducing the likeliness of cognitive impairment;
  13. reduction of the adverse mental impact of chemotherapy; and
  14. an increase in the size of brain areas linked to memory.

The article contains links to the studies supporting the conclusions.

Now get out there and move!

Paul Trudelle

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