Tag: examinations

17 Dec

Cross-examination: Pursue it or Lose it

Arielle Di Iulio Litigation Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

A party has a prima facie right to test the evidence given by a witness through cross-examination. This is a critical means to building a body of evidence to support one’s case. However, if a party does not make adequate efforts to avail themselves of the opportunity to cross-examine, they may lose this benefit. The Honourable Madam Justice Sylvia Corthorn of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice addresses this issue in her recent decision in Clayton v. Clayton et al., 2020 ONSC 7592.

Clayton involves an application to remove the trustees of two trusts that form part of an estate. The applicant in this case brought a motion for an order striking the affidavit sworn by one of the respondents and trustees, Shirley. Pursuant to a notice of cross-examination, Shirley was to be cross-examined on her affidavit on November 22, 2019.  However, prior to the commencement of cross-examinations, Shirley’s counsel advised that she would not be produced for cross-examination due to concerns about her mental capacity. Counsel agreed that an assessment of Shirley’s capacity to be cross-examined was necessary and consequently, she was not cross-examined. The applicant did not obtain a certificate of non-attendance with respect to Shirley’s cross-examination and no notice to cross-examine Shirley on a subsequent date was served.

The geriatric assessment of Shirley was scheduled for May 2020 and then postponed to the fall of 2020 due to COVID-19. There was no evidence before the court as to whether this assessment was ever done. The hearing of the application was likewise delayed as a result of the pandemic. The application is currently scheduled to be heard in January 2021.

At no point after November 2019 did the applicant pursue cross-examination of Shirley. When the application returned to court in September 2020, the applicant took the position that Shirley’s affidavit cannot be used on the application in light of her supposed incapacity and the respondents’ alleged refusal to permit cross-examination. The applicant then brought a motion requesting that the affidavit be struck in its entirety on the grounds that the admission of this evidence would be prejudicial to the fairness of the hearing and constitute an abuse of process.

Justice Corthorn dismissed the applicant’s motion. She found that he did not take any steps, prior to bringing this motion, to seek the assistance of the court in determining the steps required to address concerns with respect to Shirley’s affidavit and whether she could be cross-examined. She also considered that the application had already been adjourned three times and that the applicant had not requested a further adjournment to permit cross-examination of Shirley. Justice Corthorn affirmed that the court has discretion to prevent or limit cross-examination where it is in the interests of justice to do so. She decided that in this case, it is fair to both the process and the parties to admit Shirley’s affidavit and leave the issue of the weight to be given to her evidence to be determined with the benefit of the complete record. The parties would also have the opportunity to make submissions with respect to the weight to be given to Shirley’s evidence, and this will permit the court to control the process and avoid an abuse of it.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

03 Jan

Can a Non-Party Attend and Assist Counsel at an Examination?

Hull & Hull LLP Litigation Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

The Rules of Civil Procedure govern examinations for discovery.  Silent though, is when a non-party will be permitted to attend an examination for discovery and assist counsel.  The answer can be found in case law.

An examination for discovery is not a public hearing, and as such non-parties cannot simply show up like they can at court.  Instead, the party seeking the non-party’s attendance and assistance must either get the consent of counsel or permission from the court.

Master Dash in Poulton v. A&P Properties Ltd., set out the following governing principles:

  1. since a cross-examination on an affidavit is not a public hearing, a non-party may attend to assist a party only on the consent of the other side or on the order of the court;
  2. the onus is on the party seeking such an order to prove entitlement to it;
  3. the non-party should not be a witness at the subsequent trial;
  4. the attendance of the non-party must not disrupt the examination process;
  5. the non-party must not take the role of witness or assist the witness is answering questions; and
  6. a court in exercising its jurisdiction as to whether to allow the presence of a non-party must do so having regard to both substantive fairness to the parties and the appearance of fairness.

While every case will turn on the specific facts, it appears that generally speaking experts may attend to assist with technical and complex evidence (although they cannot later be an expert witness at trial), as well as a resource person or expert assistant who is familiar with a file in a document-intensive case.

Noah Weisberg

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01 Sep

Answering Questions During Examinations

Hull & Hull LLP General Interest, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

The Rules of Civil Procedure are quite clear as to when a lawyer may answer questions on behalf of their client during an examination for discovery.  The Rules though, appear to be less clear with respect to cross-examinations on affidavits, and as such, attention must be turned to case law.

According to Rule 31.08 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, questions on an oral examination for discovery, “…shall be answered by the person being examined but, where there is no objection, the questions may be answered by his or her lawyer”.  Simply put, if the examining party objects to an answer being given by the deponent’s lawyer, the examined party must answer the question and not their lawyer.

The rationale for this can be found in the Divisional Court decision of The Polish Alliance of Canada v. Polish Association of Toronto, where Justice Lauwers (quoting the Law of Civil Procedure in Ontario) states that: “…counsel for the party being examined should not interfere with the examination; the examiner is entitled to the evidence of the witnesses and not to that of counsel”.

Justice Lauwers provides further rationale (quoting Witnesses): “The primary reason for prohibiting communication between counsel and witness while testifying at trial is to prevent counsel from telling the witness what he or she should say. The same concern exists during a discovery, and consequently, the same basic restriction against counsel/witness communication should be in place”.

Applying the same reasoned rationale, and relying on the decision in 413528 Ontario Ltd, Justice Lauwers applies Rule 31.08 to cross-examinations on affidavits under Rule 39.02.

Therefore, whether it be an examination for discovery or a cross-examination on an affidavit, a lawyer may answer questions on behalf of the deponent, only if the examining party does not object.  There is no distinction between the two forms of examinations.

Noah Weisberg

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