Tag: estate trustee

21 Sep

Hull on Estates #622 – To Be a Trustee or Not to Be?

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On today’s podcast, Paul Trudelle and Juanita Valencia discuss the issue of when a person receiving funds becomes a trustee, as analyzed in Green Light Solutions Corp. v Baker 2021 BCCA 287.

Should you have any questions, please email us at info@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

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03 Sep

When Enough Is Enough: Ending Estate Claims

Hull & Hull LLP Estate & Trust, Litigation Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Sometimes, the court will say that enough is enough. It will put the brakes on frivolous estate litigation. 

One such case is the Court of Queens’ Bench of Alberta decision of Re Klein. There, the deceased died in 2012. She was survived by her three children, who were the beneficiaries of her estate. The estate appears to have consisted of a real property, and some bank accounts.  Notwithstanding the apparent straightforwardness of the estate, it appears that multiple proceedings were commenced as between the beneficiaries and the estate trustee in relation to the estate. 

On August 27, 2021, after various earlier court attendances, Justice Graesser put a stop to the litigation. The matter was before the court as two of the beneficiaries sought further disclosure of banking activity in relation to a $99.25 deposit into the estate account. 

In the decision, Justice Graesser reviewed the history of the estate administration and the evidence of the parties. He concluded that there was no merit in requiring the estate trustee to make any further disclosure. He noted the “proportionality” provisions of the Rules of Court. While the estate trustee may not have accounted perfectly, “Any further work, by [the estate trustee] or by the Courts in receiving or reviewing any further information or submissions, would be completely disproportionate to the magnitude of any possible failings.”

Enough Is Enough

Justice Graesser also noted the court’s readiness to dismiss frivolous claims as an abuse of process. “I subscribe to [ACJ Rooke’s] comments about the need for a cultural shift in civil litigation and to save the Courts and the litigants themselves from frivolous litigation.”

Justice Graesser pointed out that the estate trustee had previously passed her accounts, rendering may of the current complaints by the beneficiaries as res judicata. Further, the passage of time had rendered many of the claims by the estate trustee against the beneficiaries as statute-barred.

While the judge determined that he could not strike claims without hearing from the parties, he was able to continue a stay of proceedings, and not allow any of the parties to take any further steps without leave of the Chief Justice. The parties were, however, permitted to move to dismiss any existing claims. 

Justice Graesser concluded by advising: “I do not encourage the parties to continue their disputes in Court. From my extensive review of the Court filing from its beginning, I am satisfied that the parties have nothing to gain by continuing their fight.”

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

02 Sep

Limited grants as a stop-gap when probate is delayed

Stuart Clark Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

An unfortunate reality with the administration of estates is that probate can take a long time to be issued. It is not uncommon for it to take six to eight months, if not longer, after the application is filed before the Certificate of Appointment is issued. As many institutions such as banks require a Certificate of Appointment before they will grant access to estate funds, and the Estate Trustee is generally unable to deal with any real estate owned by the estate until the Certificate of Appointment has been issued, this delay can often result in complications with the initial administration of the estate. These complications can be particularly acute when there is an urgent need for the Estate Trustee to complete a particular task which requires probate, such as the potential urgent need to deal with certain real estate or assets on behalf of the estate.

In the past when faced with the urgent need for probate a common solution would be to bring a Motion seeking an order directing the Registrar to expedite the issuance of the Certificate of Appointment. As anyone who has recently attended an event at which an estates court judge has spoken can attest however this option generally appears no longer to be available, as the message being conveyed is the court is generally not prepared to order the Registrar to expedite the process absent extraordinary circumstances. Such a reluctance appears in part based on the court not wanting to place the Registrar in a position of being in contempt of court if they are unable to comply with the expedition order, as well as administrative issues the expedition orders were causing at the estate office.

The general inability to expedite the issuance of probate absent limited circumstances has raised a number of questions about what, if anything, an applicant Estate Trustee can do if faced with the urgent need for probate and their situation does not meet one of the limited circumstances the court has indicated they will consider expediting probate. Would the applicant Estate Trustee simply have to wait however long the probate application takes in the normal course, or are there other options absent expediting probate that may be available to them?

One potential solution is the use of a “limited grant” under section 29(3) of the Estates Act as a stop-gap, with the applicant Estate Trustee being provided with the authority to complete the particular urgent task under the limited grant until such a time as probate is issued at which time the limited grant would expire. As the limited grant should not require the active involvement of the Registrar, with the individual’s authority to complete the task being derived from the order itself, many of the concerns raised in relation to ordering the Registrar to expedite probate do not appear present with the limited grant.

The limited grant is technically a separate appointment from Estate Trustee, such that the order providing for the limited grant should likely contemplate items such as what is to happen to any assets subject to the limited grant upon the limited grant expiring (i.e. are they to be returned to the Estate Trustee), as well as whether an accounting for the limited grant and/or any compensation to the appointee is payable now or if it is to be deferred to any accounting for the main estate.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

31 Aug

Can you commence a claim against an estate that doesn’t have an Estate Trustee?

Stuart Clark Estate Litigation Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Generally speaking an Estate Trustee has the ability to “step into the shoes” of the deceased individual as if they were the deceased individual. I have previously blogged, for example, about the Estate Trustee’s general ability to waive any duty of confidentiality owed to the deceased individual after death. This ability to represent the deceased individual generally extends to any legal proceedings commenced against the deceased individual’s estate, with it typically falling to the Estate Trustee to represent the deceased individual or their estate in the claim. But what happens when there is no Estate Trustee? Can a legal proceeding be commenced against a deceased individual when there is no Estate Trustee, and, if so, who represents the estate in such a claim?

Rule 9.02 of the Rules of Civil Procedure provides the general framework by which a claim can be commenced against the estate a deceased individual where there is no Estate Trustee, providing for the appointment of a “litigation administrator”. Specifically, rule 9.02(1) provides:

“Where it is sought to commence or continue a proceeding against the estate of a deceased person who has no executor or administrator, the court on motion may appoint a litigation administrator to represent the estate for the purposes of the proceeding”

The “litigation administrator” is typically a neutral third party whose sole role is to represent the estate in the proceeding. The authority of the litigation administrator does not extend beyond the representation of the estate in the legal proceeding, with the litigation administrator, for example, not having the authority to make distributions to the beneficiaries or otherwise administer the estate (i.e. pay debts or liabilities). To the extent it is desired to complete such tasks someone will need to be appointed as Estate Trustee or otherwise be provided with the authority by way of court order through something like a limited grant under section 29(3) of the Estates Act.

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

17 Jun

Who gets to be Estate Trustee when no one is appointed?

Stuart Clark Executors and Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

When there is a Last Will and Testament the question of who is going to act as Estate Trustee is usually fairly straightforward, with the Will typically naming an individual to such a role. In the event the individual who is originally named as Estate Trustee is unable or unwilling to act, the Will often provides for an alternate individual to be appointed. But what happens when the Will does not name an Estate Trustee or an individual dies intestate? Who gets to be the Estate Trustee under such a circumstance?

The order of priority for who gets to act as Estate Trustee when there is no one appointed is governed by section 29(1) of the Estates Act, which provides:

“Subject to subsection (3), where a person dies intestate or the executor named in the will refuses to prove the will, administration of the property of the deceased may be committed by the Superior Court of Justice to,

(a)  the person to whom the deceased was married immediately before the death of the deceased or person with whom the deceased was living in a conjugal relationship outside marriage immediately before the death;

(b)  the next of kin of the deceased; or

(c)  the person mentioned in clause (a) and the next of kin,

as in the discretion of the court seems best, and, where more persons than one claim the administration as next of kin who are equal in degree of kindred to the deceased, or where only one desires the administration as next of kin where there are more persons than one of equal kindred, the administration may be committed to such one or more of such next of kin as the court thinks fit.”

Although the court retains the power to select amongst this group as it “thinks fit”, generally speaking the individual entitled to be appointed as Estate Trustee is the Deceased’s spouse followed by their next of kin (or some combination of these individuals). Section 29(3) of the Estates Act contemplates that the right of these individuals to be appointed as Estate Trustee is not absolute, with the court having the ability to select a different person if it thinks fit. The position of a majority of the beneficiaries can also be taken into account in selecting the individual under section 29(2).

Thank you for reading.

Stuart Clark

01 Jun

Hull on Estates #614 – Validity of a Handwritten Will and Appointment of an Estate Trustee in Conflict

76admin Estate & Trust, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, Doreen So and Arielle Di Iulio discuss the recent decision of Langrandeur Estate (Re), 2021 ONSC 3447, where the court addresses the validity of a will containing both typewritten and handwritten instructions, and the appointment of an estate trustee in conflict with the estate’s potential beneficiaries.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

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18 May

Hull on Estates #613 – The Extent of an Estate Trustee’s Duty to Account

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This week on Hull on Estates Jonathon Kappy and Sanaya Mistry discuss the recent decision of Munro v. Thomas, 2021 ONSC 3320, which considers an Estate Trustee’s obligation to account for the assets of the Estate and those which may not form part of the Estate.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

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07 May

How Broad Is a Trustee’s Duty to Account?

Paul Emile Trudelle Litigation Tags: , , , 0 Comments

It is trite law that an estate trustee has an obligation to account for his or her dealings with the assets of the estate. However, questions often arise with respect to the extent of an estate trustee’s duties to account for assets that may or may not be part of the estate.

Such questions arose in the recent decision of Munro v. Thomas, 2021 ONSC 3320 (CanLII). As stated by Gibson J. in the opening paragraph of the decision, “This is ultimately a dispute about trust which, as seems so often to be the case, involves at its heart a dispute amongst siblings about a family cottage.”

In Munro, a beneficiary and child of the deceased brought an application to compel the estate trustee to produce full bank records going back to 2013 (the deceased died in 2019), to produce full and complete medical records of the deceased, to submit an affidavit explaining all gifts made and substantial transactions entered into by the deceased (notably, the deceased gifted her cottage to 2 of her 4 children in 2011 and sold her home in 2013), and to submit to cross-examination.

The estate trustee resisted the relief being sought, arguing that it was overbroad, and not consistent with his obligations to account for assets falling within the estate.

The court heard evidence presented by the trustee on the deceased’s capacity at the time of the cottage transfer and home sale. The court concluded that the allegations of incapacity, undue influence and resulting trust were unsupported by the applicant’s evidence and accordingly, the relief sought was not to be granted.

The court dismissed the application, but allowed the estate trustee to apply, if he wanted to, to pass his accounts. Further, the court noted that a beneficiary could compel a passing of accounts. Arguably, in the context of a passing of accounts, the beneficiary could raise an issue there as to whether an asset was appropriately part of the estate or not. The court cautioned that a beneficiary who challenged a trustee’s accounting without good reason or who tries to force the trustee to pursue assets that fall outside of the estate can be held liable for costs.

It should be noted that the applicant did not seek a passing of accounts. The court held that the estate trustee may apply to pass his accounts, notwithstanding the fact that no Certificate of Appointment was granted. Although not referred to in the Munro decision, the decision of Haley J. in Re Silver Estate, 1999 CarswellOnt 4217 is clear authority that an estate trustee does not need to probate the will in order to pass accounts.

Thank you for reading. Have a great Mother’s Day weekend.

Paul Trudelle

28 Apr

An Estate Trustee/Executor Role Comes With Some Liability

Ian Hull Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

If you are asked to be someone’s estate trustee/executor, you may wonder what liability you are assuming. That is on top of the regular workload, as settling the testator’s financial affairs and distributing the remaining assets to their beneficiaries usually takes a year, involving visits to banks, lawyers and other relevant parties. Much can happen in that time, and beneficiaries may be pressuring you to quickly pass along their share of the estate.

Here are some important points to keep in mind with personal liability.

Many Last Wills and Testaments contain phrasing meant to protect loved ones as they carry out their executor duties, usually along the lines of: “No trustee acting in good faith shall be held liable for any loss, except for loss caused by his or her own dishonesty, gross negligence or a wilful breach of trust.”

That type of clause is important, but there is still some liability that comes with the position.

First, let’s make it clear that an executor does not incur personal liability for the debts and liabilities of the deceased. However, it is the executor’s duty to ensure that financial obligations are paid from the estate before any money goes to beneficiaries.

The potential liability here is particularly significant with respect to taxes. Most estates will have taxes owing, so it is the executor’s duty to ensure that all outstanding tax matters are resolved. Section 159 of the Income Tax Act requires executors to obtain a clearance certificate. This document confirms that the taxes of the deceased have been paid in full. If the executor does not obtain this certificate and the funds from the estate have already been distributed, they will be personally liable for taxes owed.

There is always a chance that an executor could discover the testator was not meeting their tax obligations to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). There are a number of reasons this may arise, ranging from simple carelessness to deliberate tax evasion. No matter the situation, the executor is responsible for rectifying that shortcoming using the estate’s funds, before money is given out to beneficiaries.

The CRA has created a Voluntary Disclosure Program that allows executors to come forward and voluntarily correct any errors or omissions without being subject to penalties or prosecution.

Personal liability for executors also arises if they spend money on professionals to help with the administration of the estate. That could include such people as lawyers, accountants, investment advisors, real estate agents, or art appraisers. Estates can be complex, so it is well within the scope of diligent executors to seek professional guidance. Accordingly, the cost for these services will be borne by the estate, not by the executor.

Detailed records must be kept of any money spent, as executors have a duty to account to the beneficiaries. These records must show all expenses paid by the estate and what money the estate received, from insurance benefits, banks or other sources.

In most cases, beneficiaries of an estate will approve, or consent to, the accounts as kept by the estate trustee. But if they feel finances were not properly managed, they can ask for court approval of the records, known as a “passing of accounts.”

Since executors have a duty to maximize the recovery, and value, of estate assets, they are personally liable for any losses they cause. That could include being reckless with the assets, which causes a loss in monetary value. Examples of this would be if an estate has to pay penalties on a tax return that the executor filed extremely late for no good reason, or if a home was sold for much less than market value.

The good news is that if an executor performs their duty diligently and honestly, any financial liability they assume will be paid by the estate.

Be safe, and have a great day.

Ian Hull

11 Mar

Dewaele v Roobroeck: The Costs of Bad Conduct

Arielle Di Iulio Estate Litigation, Litigation Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Estate litigation can be expensive. Sometimes a court may award costs to be paid personally by a party in an estates matter. Parties should always try to act reasonably throughout the litigation, as anything less may attract such adverse costs consequences. A recent example of this is the case of Dewaele v. Roobroeck, 2021 ONSC 1604.

The underlying application arose from the inability of three siblings to agree on how the estates of their late parents should be administered. The siblings were the sole beneficiaries and co-estate trustees of their parents’ estates. The daughter of the deceased parents brought an application against her two brothers seeking various relief, including an order removing them as co-estate trustees and appointing her as the sole estate trustee. Her application was successful and she sought costs against her brothers. Specifically, the applicant sought an order that her substantial indemnity costs be paid by her brothers and that the balance of her full indemnity costs be paid by the estates.

The decision on the issue of costs was given by the Honourable Justice Sheard, who held in favour of the applicant. In her written reasons, Justice Sheard provides a concise summary of the law governing the determination of cost awards in estates matters. First, she cites s.131 of the Courts of Justice Act,  R.S.O. 1990, c. C.43 as amended, which provides that, subject to the provisions of an Act or rules of court, the court has discretion to determine by whom and to what extent costs should be paid. The factors set out in Rule 57.01 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 194 guide the court’s exercise of this discretion. The overriding objective in a cost award is that it be fair and reasonable, which is, in part, determined by the reasonable expectations of the parties concerning the quantum of costs.

Justice Sheard further explains that in estate litigation, the general rule is that estate trustees are entitled to be indemnified for costs reasonably incurred in the administration of the estate. However, the “loser pays” costs regime applies to estate matters, and a blended cost award – in which a portion of the costs is paid by the litigants and a portion from the estate – is within the court’s discretion.

In this case, the applicant asked for substantial indemnity costs from her respondent brothers. Justice Sheard affirms at paragraph 19 of her decision that such an award may be made “where the losing party has engaged in behaviour worthy of sanction”. Moreover, elevated costs should only be awarded where “there has been reprehensible, scandalous or outrageous conduct on the part of one of the parties”. Here, the respondents failed in their obligations as estate trustees, deliberately interfered with the applicant’s ability to complete the administration of the estates, and failed to comply with previous court orders made. Justice Sheard found that this conduct was worthy of sanction and can be characterized as reprehensible and outrageous. As such, an elevated costs award was appropriate. Justice Sheard ultimately decided that the applicant was entitled to be fully indemnified for the costs she incurred in respect of the application, with the respondents liable to pay the majority of these costs (and the balance to be paid from the assets of the estates).

This costs decision is an excellent reminder of the importance of acting reasonably in estate litigation. If any party, including an estate trustee, chooses to act unreasonably then they may pay for it in the end.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

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