Tag: equality

28 Nov

A Step Toward Equal Inheritance Rights

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, In the News, Public Policy, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

A recent decision by an Egyptian court saw the reversal of the trend in following Islamic Sharia inheritance law under which female beneficiaries are entitled to half the interest of their male counterparts.

The claimant, a human rights lawyer, applied to obtain the same rights as her brothers on the death of her father.  Her case was previously dismissed by two courts.

In Egypt, Sharia principles are typically applied unless the parties agree that Christian inheritance laws, which do not favour male beneficiaries over females, instead be followed.  In this case, the claimant and her brothers agreed that the administration of their father’s estate would not be subject to Sharia inheritance rules.

Last year, a proposed law in Tunisia designed to promote equality in respect of inheritances sparked discussion regarding unequal inheritances in a number of jurisdictions including Egypt.  A 2017 survey suggests that over half of Tunisia’s population remains opposed to equal inheritance rights.

It is anticipated that this decision may result in significant change in jurisdictions where Sharia law has historically been applied in respect of personal property, regardless of religion.

Canadian courts have also considered the issue of cultures that may support an estate plan favouring sons over daughters simply on the basis of their gender.  In Grewal v Litt, 2019 BCSC 1154, the daughters of the deceased challenged the Wills left by their parents, who both died in 2016, on the basis that they discriminated against them in favour of their brothers on the basis of their sex.  The four daughters applied under Section 60 of the Wills, Estates and Succession Act, SBC 2009, c 13 (the “WESA“), for the variation of the Wills that directed the payment of $150,000 to each daughter, while the residue of the estates valued at greater than $9 million was left to the two sons.

Justice Adair noted that there was no dispute that the parents owed a moral obligation to their daughters under BC law, and, as the Wills made inadequate provision for them, they should be varied under the WESA.  The Court attempted to resolve the matter by balancing the adequate, just, and equitable provision for the daughters with their parents’ testamentary autonomy and varied the division of estate assets from approximately 93% in favour of the sons with only a combined 7% for the daughters, to the more equitable division of 15% of the value of the estates for each daughter and 20% for each son.  Notwithstanding the granting of the variation of the Wills, the Court stopped short of finding that the parents’ testamentary intentions were motivated solely by unacceptable discrimination against the daughters.

While many provinces do not recognize a parental obligation to benefit a non-dependant adult child after death, coming years may nevertheless see an increase in the number of challenges to a will on the basis that its terms are discriminatory.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

17 May

The Power of a Great Dissent

Nick Esterbauer General Interest, In the News, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Last night, I attended an advance screening of RBG, a documentary focusing on the career of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a current Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.  Justice Ginsburg is a long-time social rights activist and advocate well known for her work in promoting gender equality on both sides of the bench.

More recently, Justice Ginsburg has gained notoriety for frequent dissenting opinions within the context of a primarily conservative judiciary.  While a dissent is, by definition, “a disagreement with [the] majority decision” (Black’s Law Dictionary) that becomes law, one should not underestimate the value of a strong dissent over time.

At provincial appellate courts in Canada, a strong dissent may be of great assistance in preparing an application seeking leave to appeal to the Supreme Court, as well as at the appeal stage if leave is granted.  Dissenting opinions of the Supreme Court of Canada have been referred to as the voice of the future, with prophetic potential.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

02 Dec

The All Families are Equal Act is Passed!

Doreen So General Interest, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

photo-1454908225854-b200322cd05aAs previously blogged about by Natalia Angelini, the All Families are Equal Act was introduced on September 29, 2016 and it was unanimously passed by the Ontario legislatively assembly on November 29, 2016.

We encourage those interested in this new Act to click here for the Ministry of Attorney General Newsroom release.  According to the Ministry,

“The new law will:

  • Provide greater clarity and certainty for parents who use assisted reproduction to conceive a child
  • Provide a streamlined process for the legal recognition of parents who use a surrogate, together with requirements meant to protect the rights of all parties through independent legal advice and confirmation of the surrogate’s consent both before conception and after birth
  • Reduce the need for parents who use assisted reproduction to have to go to court to have their parental status recognized in law.”

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

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