Tag: enforcement

05 Nov

When Will a Rule 49 Settlement Be Enforced?

Kira Domratchev Litigation Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

According to Rule 49.09 of the Rules of Civil Procedure, a party may bring a motion for judgment in accordance with the terms of an accepted offer and the judge may grant judgment with respect to same or continue the proceeding as if there had been no accepted offer to settle.

In a recent Court of Appeal decision (Hashemi-Sabet Estate v Oak Ridges Pharmasave Inc. 2018 ONCA 839) the Court had to determine whether the motion judge erred in giving judgment in accordance with a Rule 49 offer to settle because said offer was revoked before it was accepted.

Background

The Respondent (the Estate), sued the Appellant for damages for breach of contract, oppression and various other causes of action relating to the opening and operation of a pharmacy.

On June 8, 2015, the Appellant served the Respondent with a written Rule 49 offer to settle the action. In accordance with Rule 49, the offer provided that it would be open until the trial of the action.

In April, 2016, the Appellant retained new counsel, and a Notice of Change of Lawyer was served in accordance with the Rules of Civil Procedure.

On September 20, 2016, the parties attended a pre-trial conference. The Appellant maintains that the June 8, 2015 offer to settle was rescinded orally at the pre-trial conference and that the offer to settle served on September 19, 2016 revoked the June 8, 2015 offer, in any event.

The Respondent on the other hand, maintained that when counsel returned to their office following the pre-trial conference, a written acceptance of the June 8, 2015 offer to settle was sent by fax at 1:27 p.m. on the same day. According to further evidence tendered by the Respondent, opposing counsel’s office called and requested a copy of the June 8, 2015 offer to settle following the pre-trial conference on September 20, 2016 and that a copy was sent to opposing counsel via email at 2:34 p.m. that day (arguably after acceptance of same was sent via fax).

The Respondent acknowledged receipt of the second offer to settle but maintained that it was not served until 5:23 p.m. on September 20, 2016 (hours after the June 8, 2015 offer was accepted).

The Respondent brought a motion for judgment in accordance with the June 8, 2015 offer to settle and the motion judge granted same. The Appellant appealed the decision to the Court of Appeal.

Court of Appeal Decision

The Court agreed with the motion judge. The Court found that the revocation of the June 8, 2015 offer to settle did not comply with Rule 49.02(1) which requires that the revocation be made in writing. As such, the timing of service of the second offer to settle would be determinative of the motion.

The Court held that in determining whether to enforce a Rule 49 offer to settle, a two-step approach is to be undertaken, similar to the pre-Hryniak v Mauldin 2014 Supreme Court of Canada decision Rule 20 summary judgment analysis.

As such, the Court agreed with the motion judge’s analysis in accordance with the above-noted framework was appropriate as follows:

  1. Whether an agreement to settle had been reached;
  2. Whether, on all the evidence, the agreement should be enforced.

The Court agreed that the motion judge had to make credibility findings and held that the Respondent’s position was more credible such that the June 8, 2015 was accepted and that judgment in accordance with the said offer should be enforced. In particular, the Court had trouble with the fact that the Appellant had known for over a year that the Respondent took the position that their counsel was not served with the second offer to settle until 5:23 p.m. on September 20, 2016, but did not submit an Affidavit of Service from the process server.

In light of this decision, it is particularly important to be mindful of the particular rules related to Rule 49 offers to settle, both in making an offer to settle and considering to revoke same. Particularly in relation to service of an offer to settle, it may a good idea to serve it in such a manner as to be able to confirm receipt of same by the other side, such as via facsimile. It is important to remember that service via email will not qualify as proper service, particularly if the opposing side maintains the email was never received.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

What is a Rule 49 Offer to Settle?

Revoking a Rule 49 Offer to Settle

Cost Awards and Offers to Settle

20 Dec

Hull on Estates #498 – Enforcing Settlements After the Death of a Party

Hull & Hull LLP Archived BLOG POSTS - Hull on Estates, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Today on Hull on Estates, Natalia Angelini and Umair Abdul Qadir discuss Lewicki Estate v Nytschyk Estate, 2016 ONSC 7459, a recent Ontario Superior Court of Justice decision in which the Court considered the enforceability of a settlement between a dependant and an Estate where the dependant died before the settlement was finalized. For more about the decision, please read Suzana Popovic-Montag’s recent blog post.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Natalia Angelini.

Click here for more information on Umair Abdul Qadir.

14 Mar

Essential Terms of Settlement Offers

Hull & Hull LLP Litigation Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

If an offer is negotiated and later accepted, how is a court to resolve a later dispute over the form of the release?  The Court in Glaspell v. Glaspell Estate, (2008) 36 E.T.R. (3d) 315 held that a release that does not commit a signatory to taking any steps other than those contemplated by the settlement agreement will suffice, even if overly wordy.  The parties had reached a settlement agreement: the evidence disclosed mutual intention to create a legally binding contract between the parties and an eventual agreement containing all of the essential terms agreed upon.    

Unfortunately, the settlement agreement did not specify the form of release.  When it came time to dismiss the action, the plaintiff refused the defendant’s form of release.  So the defendant brought a motion to enforce the apparent settlement.  The judge allowed the motion and denied the plaintiff’s cross-motion to amend the settlement terms, dismissing the action.  

An implied aspect of this decision is that mere form of release is not necessarily an essential or fundamental term of an agreement so long as the essential terms themselves are not altered.  The decision does not preclude the possibility in other situations though.

Enjoy your weekend.

Chris Graham

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