Tag: electronic wills

06 Aug

Off-site funerals

James Jacuta Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Funerals, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

With the summer vacation now at the midpoint, many people are travelling as part of their holidays. But, what can one do when a friend or family member dies while you are on vacation? Does your trip have to be cut short? Are there additional charges to be paid for changing dates on plane tickets and for hotel room cancellations?  Not any longer. In many cases, a livestream funeral service is now available. Some companies provide this service via the internet. Or, depending upon the funeral home, wireless can be used to stream the memorial service using facetime or skype. There are even websites that provide information and assist with the planning of the do-it-yourself camera work.

There are many advantages for those who cannot attend even if not on vacation. Other reasons to not attend in person might be because of illness, distance, cost or other barriers.  Now almost everyone can attend from wherever they are.

Also, the funeral service can be archived and watched again online. This can be of benefit not only to those who could not attend the service in person but also to family members who were there. It can help in dealing with their loss or to simply remember things that were missed in the immediate grief of the service. Technology has developed rapidly. It has become accepted and has recently extended into the areas of wills and estates, providing services such as online obituaries instead of publishing in newspapers; advertising for estate creditors using online services instead of much more expensive newspaper print notices; cataloging and registering the location of wills (in some jurisdictions); assisting lawyers in automated interactive drafting of wills (like the Hull e-State Planner); recognizing the validity of electronic wills (in some jurisdictions); among others. The trend towards even more changes coming in this area is strong and there is hope that expanding technology use will serve to assist friends and family members through difficult times.

Thanks for reading!
Jim Jacuta

14 Jan

Probate and Wills: What About Electronic Wills?

Kira Domratchev Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

In Ontario, a Will has to be in writing and typically an original is required for probate to be granted. With the increase of the technological presence in the everyday life of a typical Canadian, the question remains, should electronic Wills be admitted to probate?

Clare E. Burns and Leandra Appugliesi wrote an interesting paper on this topic titled “There’s an App for that: E-Wills in Ontario” that argued for the development of a legislative scheme in Ontario that admits the possibility of electronic Wills.

In discussing this question, the experience of other jurisdictions was considered, including the United States and Australia.

In 2005, the State of Tennessee was the first American state to recognize the validity of a Will executed with an e-signature. In that particular case, the deceased prepared his Will on his computer and asked two of his neighbours to serve as witnesses. A computer-generated signature was affixed to the Will. Almost ten years later, in 2013, the State of Ohio admitted to probate a Will that was written in the deceased’s own handwriting and signed by him, on a tablet computer.

It appears that electronic Wills are most probably valid in Florida, Texas and California and consistent with existing legislation, though the legislation does not specifically contemplate electronic Wills. The State of Nevada, on the other hand, has specifically enacted legislation which expressly allows for the validity of electronic Wills.

Australia, in comparison to the United States, has managed the question of electronic Wills by making use of the “substantial compliance” legislation that exists in each state, which gives the state courts the authority to dispense with the formal requirements for the execution of the Will. In comparison, the legislation in Ontario is one of “strict compliance” such that the formalities of a Will are required before a Certificate of Appointment is granted.

It appears that in Ontario, though a Court could theoretically admit an electronic Will (i.e. not an original copy) to probate, the formalities in accordance with the Succession Law Reform Act must be met, in any event. As a result, an electronic Will that does not meet any one of the formalities will almost certainly not be admitted to probate.

As various electronic gadgets are now being used more and more, Canadians are also using them to make testamentary documents. In keeping with the realities of contemporary life, it may be that legislative reform is needed.

In discussing the possibility of legislative reform, Ms. Burns and Ms. Appugliesi, also addressed the importance of various policy considerations. In doing so, they addressed the John J. Langbein analysis, which set out four main purposes to the formalities requirements in any Wills legislation:

  1. Evidentiary: the writing, signature and attestation requirements serve as evidence of testamentary intent in a reliable and permanent form;
  2. Channeling: the writing, signature and attestation requirements ease the administrative burden on the court system by setting out a uniform checklist of what is required before probate can be granted;
  3. Cautionary: the formalities are designed to impress the seriousness of the testamentary act upon the testator so as to ensure that he or she has fully thought through the result of executing the Will; and
  4. Protective: the formalities are designed to reduce the opportunity for fraud and undue influence by involving witnesses in the process.

As litigators, the “evidentiary” and the “protective” purposes are particularly important, as we often consider questions of testamentary intent, undue influence and fraud (albeit more rarely), amongst other things.

From that perspective, any legislative amendments to be made must address the various policy considerations and the implications of any such amendments on the legal system in Ontario.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

The Introduction of e-Wills

Unsent Text Message Found to Be Valid Will. LOL.

The Validity of iWills

09 Jun

The Introduction of e-Wills

Noah Weisberg General Interest, In the News, Wills Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently came across this interesting article regarding legislation introduced in Florida authorizing electronic Wills and electronic Will execution.

Titled the Florida Electronic Wills Act, currently awaiting final approval from the Governor of Florida, permits exactly what its title suggests – a testator can create and sign a Will on a tablet, computer, or in another electronic form, and witnessing of the Will may be done using remote audio and video technology.

So, the Act still requires that the Will be written, signed, and witnessed.  But, it allows all of this to happen in cyberspace.

Certain safeguards are built into the Act.  For instance, virtual will signing meetings must be recorded and stored to be available for evidence in case there is a later dispute.  As well, at the video session, the testator must present ID and answer certain questions, including whether the testator “is of sound mind” and “is signing the document voluntarily”.

Hoping to jump into this new market, a company called willing.com, has launched a website to assist testators with making their Wills online.  Not everyone is pleased though with the proposed Act in its current form, as evidenced by the submissions of the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section of the Florida Bar.

Nothing of this sort exists in Ontario….just yet.  Interestingly though, the Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan prepared a Report on Electronic Wills in 2004.

Noah Weisberg

Other interesting blogs may be found here:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET