Earlier this week I was so pleased to participate in the kick-off of the first OBA Elder Law Day Conference. We had a full day of venerated experts addressing a wide array of issues impacting older Ontarians (our fastest growing demographic). With more than a dozen speakers, including a key-note presentation by Jane Meadus of the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE), the materials for the program are a must read.

Much was learned, including about our long-term care (LTC) system, which the health crisis has brought into greater focus. Audrey Miller, our final presenter for the day, looked at LTC challenges exacerbated by our aging population outpacing the accommodations available, and cited some staggering statistics in that regard.  She also educated us on the LTC application process, which includes:

  • An application is made through the Home and Community Care Support Services (HCCSS) (formerly the LHIN, and, before that, CCAC) for a private room, semi-private, or basic/ward bed (up to 4 beds in a room);
  • The applicant can apply to up to 5 different facilities;
  • The wait time can range from a few months to a few years, with priority being determined by a number of different factors;
  • Once a bed is offered, an applicant has 24-hours to accept it. If refused, barring a significant change in circumstance the person’s name is removed from the lists. Three months must pass before a new application can proceed (though the 3-month penalty has been waived as a result of the pandemic); and
  • Each resident has to pay a monthly co-payment, with the rate varying according to home’s structural class and move-in date.

With increasing demand for LTC facilities, there are many applicants on waitlists. Though most prefer to live at home, they cannot afford to do so given their increasing care needs, the high associated costs and the lack of sufficient publicly funded home care services. It thus comes as no surprise that by the time residents are admitted into LTC, the statistics cited by Ms. Miller indicate that 9/10 of the residents have mental impairment, over 40% exhibit aggressive behaviours due to their cognitive condition, and 1 in 3 is completely dependent on staff. These figures highlight the critical need and importance of increasing the daily direct care being provided to residents. As noted in my earlier blog, within the next four years the Ontario budget aims to increase direct care to 4 hours per day.

Looking ahead, $3 billion in spending is pledged in the federal budget over five years to strengthen Canada’s LTC systems, a task force is being put into place to develop a new National LTC Services standard, and Ontario’s Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission’s Final Report made numerous recommendations for change. We will be following the progress.

Thanks for reading and have a great day,

Natalia Angelini