Tag: Disinheritance

21 Jul

You were left out of the will – what are your options?

Ian Hull Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

When parents are creating their Last Will and Testament, they often direct that assets are to be divided amongst their children. However, this is not always how it works, as the testator has the right to leave their estate to whomever they want unless they have dependents who must be financially taken care of.

Indeed, some very rich celebrities – Sting, Elton John, Mark Zuckerberg, Warren Buffet and others – reportedly have said that their children will not receive the bulk of their estates. Their reasons include giving them “some semblance of normality, some respect for money, some respect for work” and “huge sums of wealth … distorts anything they might do in creating their own path.”

You may not have multimillionaires as parents, but there is the chance that when they die, you will not be named as a beneficiary in the will. If that happens and you feel you are entitled to some portion of the estate, a legal challenge to the will can be mounted. But beware – the process will be difficult and the chances of success uncertain.

The first thing to keep in mind is that only a spouse or dependent children can contest a will that has disinherited them. You have to have a financial interest in the estate and must be able to show you were named in a prior will, or that the deceased had promised to take care of you after their passing.

If probate has not already been granted, you can file a Notice of Objection with the court registrar. If probate has been granted, then you have to bring a motion for the return of the certificate of appointment.

Before doing that, it is wise to discuss with legal counsel why you are objecting to the will. If your reasons are based on emotion rather than reason, you will likely be advised to walk away and accept the situation. The court has little tolerance for notices of objections based on frivolous claims, and you may end up having to pay the legal costs the estate incurred in defending against your claim.

You also have to consider if contesting the will makes financial sense. Does the potential gain outweigh the legal costs (not to mention the time, effort and emotional stress) the process may cause?

That being said, there are valid reasons for taking legal action. The two main ones are that there was a lack of testamentary capacity when the final Will and Testament was drawn up, or that the testator was subject to undue influence by someone. Other valid reasons for mounting these challenges include:

  • the will is unsigned or not properly witnessed
  • the testator was not aware of the full contents of their estate
  • there are ambiguous terms in the will that are open to interpretation
  • simple fraud is alleged

Any of these reasons are grounds for filing a Notice of Objection. If successful, the will may be declared invalid.

Cases that come before the court include instances where a person near the end of their life leaves their estate to a much younger person who was their caregiver or romantic partner. Family members who find themselves cut out of the inheritance have to prove that the new beneficiary exerted undue influence in the writing of the will.

That is difficult, as mental capacity is a fluid concept. A person may have the capacity to enter into a marriage, but be incapable of effectively managing their own financial affairs. As the population ages, with many people holding onto sizeable financial portfolios, we will likely see more of these predatory marriages in the future.

Challenging a will in court can be a costly, time-consuming and emotionally draining experience. Litigation can pit family members against each other, straining relationships in a time when they should be mourning. Even if they win, beneficiaries may have to wait for years as the legal process unfolds.

If you feel you have been unfairly denied an inheritance, you should speak to a wills and estates lawyer. While every case is fact-dependent, they can provide you with an informed opinion about your chances of success.

Thanks for reading, and have a great day.

Ian Hull

21 Oct

The Difficulty with Disinheriting a Child

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Trustees, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , 0 Comments

Disinheritance has long been a subject replete with interest. Is it a doleful mishap, a strange whim rooted in spite, a tragedy, or is it just desserts and a shield by which elderly persons can impose good behaviour on their successors? Charles Dickens was fascinated with the subject. From Great Expectations to Martin Chuzzlewit, many of his tales include fabulously wealthy testators, parasitical and destitute minor relatives, wronged rightful heirs, family bonds eroded by greed, artifice and deception – and often, in the end, a just outcome. Similar to how the poignancy of this theme stirred Dickens’ readers, aggrieved disinherited parties are often so stirred, to put it mildly, that they commence all-out legal warfare – quenching their scorn with the costly and sometimes blackened bread of estate litigation.

From the testator’s point of view, there is no foolproof method of disinheriting a child. It certainly helps if the child is not dependent, is an adult, has no basis for expecting anything, and there is a forceful, probative reason for the disinheritance (i.e. “so-and-so didn’t let me see my grandchildren”). It might be a good idea for a testator to explicitly state that he or she is disinheriting a child, lest the child later make the argument that the omission was a slip-of-the-mind rather than deliberate disinheritance. The testator may also include a clause explaining the rationale, though this can be dangerous – disinheriting someone out of racism (Spence v. B.M.O. Trust Company, [2015] O.N.S.C. 615 at paras. 49-50).

Some drafting solicitors may suggest giving a small, nominal amount to the otherwise disinherited child – to partially appease the child, appear more moderate to a judge, or otherwise “save face”. The problem with this, however, is that as soon as someone is a beneficiary, he or she may be able to invoke beneficiary rights, such as objecting to the passing of accounts.

As for disinherited children, they may have legal recourse, such as section 58(1) of the Succession Law Reform Act, which gives the court discretion to determine if “adequate provision” has been made for a testator’s “dependants”. In Tataryn v. Tataryn Estate, [1994] 2 S.C.R. 807, the Supreme Court overturned the explicit disinheritance of a son and wife because it found that the testator failed his “moral obligation” to provide for them. If a dependant support claim leads nowhere, a disinherited child can always challenge the will, for the wellspring of arbitrary disinheritance is often incapacity or undue influence.

It is hard to lose a parent. Hard, too, is the loss of an inheritance. Keeping this in mind, testators who wish to prevent a conflagration of litigation might opt not to light the spark of disinheritance. If they feel the circumstances demand it, however, they should work with their estate planners to fortify their legal positions against the storms which might otherwise gather.

Thank you for reading,
Suzana Popovic-Montag and Devin McMurtry

30 May

Instagram evidence key to claim against French rock star’s estate

Nick Esterbauer Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, In the News, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

A recent decision dealing with the estate of a French rock star highlights the potential relevance of social media evidence in estates matters.

Johnny Halliday, known as the “French Elvis”, died in 2017, leaving a Last Will and Testament that left his entire estate to his fourth wife, disinheriting his adult children from a previous marriage.  The New York Times reports that French law does not permit a testator to disinherit his or her children in such a manner, and the adult children made a claim against the estate on that basis.  The issue became whether the deceased singer had lived primarily in the United States or in France.

Halliday was active on Instagram, using the service to promote his albums and tours, as well as to share details of his personal life with fans.  The adult children were, accordingly, able to track where their father had been located in the years leading up to his death, establishing that he had lived in France for 151 days in 2015 and 168 in 2016, before spending 7 months immediately preceding his death in France.  Their position based on the social media evidence was preferred over that of Halliday’s widow and their claims against the estate were permitted.

Decisions like this raise the issue of whether parties to estate litigation can be required to produce the contents of their social media profiles as relevant evidence to the issues in dispute.  Arguably, within the context of estates, social media evidence may be particularly relevant to dependant’s support applications, where the nature of an alleged dependant’s relationship with the deceased, along with the lifestyle enjoyed prior to death, may be well-documented.

The law regarding the discoverability of social media posts in estate and family law in Canada is still developing.  While the prevalence of social media like Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook is undeniable, services like these have not become popular only in the last fifteen years or so and it seems that users continue to share increasingly intimate parts of their lives online.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

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