Tag: disclaimer of gifts

18 Jun

Disclaiming an Inheritance for Another’s Benefit

Arielle Di Iulio Estate & Trust, General Interest, In the News, Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

The last will and testament of the gunman responsible for Nova Scotia’s mass shooting in April 2020 was recently made public. The gunman’s will names his common law spouse as the executor of his estate, estimated to be worth around $1.2 million. However, the gunman’s spouse has renounced her right to be executor of his estate and it is now being administered by the Public Trustee. It was also rumoured that the spouse had renounced any interest she may have had in the gunman’s sizable estate.

Whether the gunman’s partner did in fact relinquish any inheritance remains to be confirmed. However, there are a multitude of reasons why someone may choose to waive their right to an inheritance, including:

  • Emotional grounds;
  • Personal moral or ethical grounds;
  • To avoid taking possession of an undesirable or costly asset, such as real property that requires significant repairs or maintenance;
  • To avoid subjecting assets to potential creditors if the beneficiary is on the brink of bankruptcy or involved in a lawsuit; or
  • To allow the asset to pass to a secondary beneficiary.

For an overview of what is required to properly disclaim an inheritance, you can read Ian Hull’s blog here.

As shown by the above list, even where a beneficiary does not plan to benefit personally from an inheritance they may still be interested in what happens to that inheritance. In such situations, the beneficiary may want to think carefully about whether disclaiming their inheritance is the best option.

It is important to note that a person can only disclaim a gift if they have not yet benefited from the assets and, once disclaimed, that person has no control over the assets. In other words, a beneficiary who renounces a gift should not have anything to do with those assets either before or after they have been disclaimed. This also means that the beneficiary should not have any say in who receives the inheritance.

If a person wants to disclaim their inheritance in order for it to pass to a secondary beneficiary, they should confirm whether the deceased’s will or intestacy laws, as applicable, provide for that outcome. If it does not, or if the person wishes to direct their inheritance to some other individual or charity, there is another option: they can accept the inheritance and give some or all of the assets to whomever they choose. Depending on the beneficiary’s particular goals and circumstances, accepting an inheritance and distributing the assets as they see fit may be preferable to disclaiming the assets.

Thanks for reading!

Arielle Di Iulio

21 May

Hull on Estates #379 – Disclaimers of gifts under wills

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Hull on Estates #379 – Disclaimers of gifts under wills 

Today on Hull on Estates, Paul Trudelle and Moira Visoiu discuss disclaimers of gifts under wills and when they can be effective, what’s necessary for there to be a valid disclaimer, and what the effect there is of a disclaimer.

If you have any questions, please email us at hull.laywers@gmail.com, or leave a comment on our blog page.

Click here for more information on Paul Trudelle.

Click here for more information on Moira Visoiu.

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