Tag: Crime

22 Feb

Not Love, Actually

Paul Emile Trudelle Estate & Trust, Estate Planning Tags: , , , 0 Comments

As the last of the Valentine’s Day chocolate is being eaten, I write to raise some red flags relating to “romance scams”.

The US Embassy in Ghana has recently posted a warning about internet romance or friendship scams, particularly relating to correspondents purporting to be in Ghana.

The US Embassy has posted a list of “indicators” that may indicate a scam. These include:

  1. You met a friend/fiancé online.
  2. You have never met face to face.
  3. Your correspondent professed love at “warp speed”.
  4. Your friend/fiancé is plagued with medical or other life problems that require loans.
  5. You are promised repayment upon the inheritance of alluvial gold or gems (!).
  6. You have sent money for visas or plane tickets, but the person cannot seem to make it out of Ghana.
  7. When your correspondent does try to leave the country, he or she claims to have been in a car accident or is detained by immigration, and requires more money.
  8. Your correspondent consistently uses lower case “i’s” and/or grammar not in keeping with their supposed live station or education level.

Internet scams appear to be a growth industry. According to the 2017 Internet Crime Report of the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, they have received over 300,000 complaints in 2017. The value of victim losses in 2017 was $1.42 Billion!

 

Source: FBI IC3 2017 Internet Crime Report

The number and dollar value of the losses are higher amongst older victims. As a result, the US Justice Department announced a coordinated sweep of elder fraud cases under the “Elder Justice Initiative”. “The mission of the Elder Justice Initiative is to support and coordinate the Department’s enforcement and programmatic efforts to combat elder abuse, neglect and financial fraud and scams that target our nation’s seniors.”

Now, if only they can do something about that guy who keeps emailing me to say that he has hacked my computer, and asking me for $737 worth of bitcoins in exchange for not sending videos of me surfing the internet to all of my contacts.

Thanks for reading.

Paul Trudelle

15 Dec

Santa Claus in the Courts

Paul Emile Trudelle General Interest, In the News, Litigation, News & Events Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Aside from the seminal yet apparently unreported decision of The State of New York v. Kris Kringle, which was dramatized in Miracle on 34th Street, there have been numerous other mentions of Santa Claus in judicial decisions. In honour of the season, I take this opportunity to note the following:

  • In Frasko v. Saturn 121, Inc. et al, which the judge described as “a novel application”, the plaintiff sued 115 shell corporations. (The plaintiff was said to be in the business of buying and selling shelf companies.) The plaintiff noted the 115 defendants in default, and moved for default judgment.  In support of the noting in default, the plaintiff filed a 100 page affidavit of service.  In it, as stated by the judge, the plaintiff claimed to have served or attempted to personally serve the 115 corporate defendants at a wide variety of locations throughout Ontario in only three days, plus 10 other corporate defendants in another proceeding. The judge questioned the accuracy of the affidavit of service, stating: “While Santa Claus has perfected the art of visiting millions of homes in a single night, [the plaintiff’s] affidavit of service makes no claim to have enlisted such assistance in effecting such a miracle of personal service.”

 

  • In Royal Bank v. Edna Granite & Marble Inc, the defendants argued that they had not made payments on a loan for a number of years, and thus the claim was statute-barred. Payments were, however, made by the guarantors of the loan. The bank argued that it did not matter who made the payments: whether they were made “by the borrower, by the Guarantors, or by Santa Claus”. The court accepted this argument.

 

  • In v. Liu, referred to in R. v. Sipes at para. 718, the accused was charged with first-degree murder. Upon his arrest, scratches were observed on his neck and chest. Expert evidence established that the scratches were consistent with ancient Chinese medical treatment. For some reason, the accused sent one of the investigating officers a Christmas card depicting Santa Claus with scratches on his back, being looked at incredulously by Mrs. Claus. The front of the card read “I swear, Honey – I scratched it going down a chimney. Inside the card read “Sometimes, even Mrs. Claus has a hard time believing in Santa.” There, the Crown was unsuccessful in adducing the card as evidence at trial, as its probative value was “tenuous”, yet the potential prejudice was high.

 

  • In v. M.J.O., the judge had difficulty believing the accused’s evidence. “I have read the Mr. M.J.O.’s statement on several occasions. I cannot imaging circumstances that would lead me to believe it. To believe that version of events, in the face of the objective evidence, I would have to believe in Santa Claus and the tooth—fairy.”

There are many other reported reference to Santa Claus on CanLII. Many of them are in sad or disturbing contexts, and are not appropriate for a Friday, pre-Christmas blog.

Happy holidays.

Paul Trudelle

04 Aug

Allegations of Murder and Disinheritance in Ontario

Umair Estate & Trust, Executors and Trustees, In the News, Litigation, News & Events, Public Policy, Trustees, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this week, the controversy surrounding the estate of American real estate developer and multi-millionaire John Chakalos dominated the headlines.

Issues Surrounding Mr. Chakalos’s Estate

Mr. Chakalos, who left a sizeable estate, was found dead at his home in 2013. Pursuant to the terms of Mr. Chakalos’s Will, his daughter Linda was one of the beneficiaries of his estate. Linda went missing and is presumed dead after a boat carrying her and her son, Nathan, sank during a fishing trip.

According to media reports, Linda’s son Nathan was also a suspect in the death of his grandfather, but was never charged. Nathan has denied the allegations regarding his involvement in his grandfather’s death and his mother’s disappearance.

According to an article by TIME, Mr. Chakalos’s three other daughters have now commenced a lawsuit in New Hampshire wherein they have accused Nathan of killing his grandfather and potentially his mother. The plaintiff daughters have asked the Court to bar Nathan from receiving his inheritance from Mr. Chakalos’s estate.

Public Policy and the Law in Ontario

It is important to note that Mr. Chakalos’s grandson has not been charged in the death of Mr. Chakalos, and the allegations against him have yet to be proven. However, there have been similar cases in Ontario where the accused beneficiary has ultimately been found to have caused the death of the testator.

Generally speaking, in Ontario, a beneficiary who is found to have caused the death of the testator is not entitled to benefit from their criminal act. This common law doctrine, often referred to as the “slayer rule,” stands for the proposition that it would be offensive to public policy for a person to benefit from the estate of a testator if the Court concludes that they have caused the death of the testator.

You can read more about the “slayer rule” on our blog here and here.

Thank you for reading,

Umair Abdul Qadir

18 Aug

Criminal Theft and Destruction of Wills – Part 2

Nick Esterbauer General Interest, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this week, I blogged about criminal offences involving the theft and destruction of testamentary documents.  Case law dealing with these provisions of Canada’s Criminal Code is sparse.

The 2015 British Columbia Supreme Court decision in D’Angola v. British Columbia involved multiple allegations, including an accusation that a last will and testament had been fraudulently concealed contrary to section 340 of the Criminal Code.  The matter featured a mandamus application by the daughter of the deceased, who sought her sister’s prosecution for this and various other alleged violations of the Criminal Code.

unnamedThe deceased, the father of the sisters, had left a will dated May 6, 2003.  The will named the applicant’s sister as estate trustee and otherwise treated both sisters equally.  The applicant had apparently inquired of her sister whether the deceased had a will after their father died and did not receive a clear response.  Approximately five months later, the named estate trustee contacted the applicant by email and informed her of the existence of their father’s will.  Eventually, the applicant was informed, by counsel for the applicant’s sister, that the sister had been named as estate trustee, was in the process of administering the estate, and that the deceased’s property located in Italy had been transferred to the two sisters and their mother in accordance with Italian succession law.  The applicant later became dissatisfied with the estate trustee’s administration of the estate, stating that her conduct in that regard had been both negligent and criminal.

In summarizing the Lower Court’s decision regarding the allegation of criminal concealment of the will, Justice V. Gray noted that “even if the Sister concealed the Late Father’s will, there [was] no evidence of a fraudulent purpose on the part of the Sister, and there was nothing for the Sister to gain by concealing it.”  Justice Gray declined to exercise the discretion to order a reconsideration of the issues by the Court.

Although few other decisions consider allegations of criminal theft and/or concealment of wills, this decision by the British Columbia Supreme Court suggests that, with respect to allegations of concealment under section 340 of the Criminal Code, a fraudulent purpose will be a prerequisite.  Further, the Court’s considerations may include whether any benefit has been received by the accused in concealing the testamentary instrument.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

16 Aug

Criminal Theft and Destruction of Wills

Nick Esterbauer General Interest, Uncategorized, Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Our blog has previously discussed the importance of original testamentary documents at length.  Typically, an original will is required in order to apply for a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee With a Will.  If an original will cannot be located, it may be presumed that it was physically destroyed, and therefore revoked, by the testator.  Alternatively, a copy of a will may be admitted to probate upon the filing of a lost will application.  However, this remedy is not a fix-all that can be used in all situations in which an original will cannot be located and, even when successful, will result in additional legal fees and delays in the administration of the estate.

A49952BF7ACertain provisions within the Criminal Code of Canada criminalize the theft and destruction of another person’s testamentary instruments in recognition of the importance of these documents.  At Section 2, the Criminal Code defines a “testamentary instrument” as including “any will, codicil or other testamentary writing or appointment, during the life of the testator whose testamentary disposition it purports to be and after his death, whether it relates to real or personal property or to both”.

Typically, the theft of personal property valued at less than $5,000.00 is a summary offence and can result in up to two years of imprisonment.  Where stolen property meets the definition of a testamentary instrument, the seriousness of the crime is elevated to an indictable offence, punishable by up to ten years in prison (section 334(a) of the Criminal Code).  The possession of a stolen testamentary instrument is also a crime in Canada.  The Criminal Code prohibits possession of property obtained by a criminal act and specifically identifies the possession of a stolen testamentary instrument as an indictable offence with a penalty of up to ten years of prison (sections 354, 355(a)).

Similarly, the destruction, concealment, cancellation, or obliteration of a testamentary instrument “for a fraudulent purpose” is an indictable offence and a conviction may result in up to ten years of imprisonment (section 340).  The destruction of a testamentary instrument as a result of an act of mischief is also an indictable offence , punishable by up to ten years in prison (section 430(3)).

The provisions of the Criminal Code outlined above illustrate the significance of the original copy of a last wills and testaments, codicils, and other testamentary documents in Canada and the lengths that the law will go to in protecting the sanctity of these original documents that are typically required in order to administer an estate in the way intended by the testator.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

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