Tag: CPD

23 Apr

Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission Report

Hull & Hull LLP Uncategorized Tags: , , , 0 Comments
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In July 2020, the provincial government announced a Commission into COVID-19 and long-term care. The Commission was mandated to investigate how the pandemic spread within the homes, how residents, staff and families were impacted, and the adequacy of measures taken by the province and other parties. With the expected release of the Commission’s final report on April 30, 2021, the province will now review the report and begin to consider changes.

Come join Hull & Hull LLP’s Natalia Angelini and Wahl Elder Law’s Judith Wahl as they co-chair the upcoming OBA program: Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission Report, on Tuesday, May 11th from 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm.

The Chair of the Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission, The Hon. Associate Chief Justice Frank N. Marrocco, will be sharing his insights. This will be followed by a panel discussion on the key legal issues that arose and are continuing to arise in Long-Term Care settings across the province.

This program is eligible for up to 1 hour and 30 minutes of substantive CPD hours.

Registration via the Ontario Bar Association can be found here.

 

04 Jan

New Year’s Resolutions 2021

James Jacuta General Interest Tags: , , , 0 Comments

As 2020 has come to a close, we all fervently hope that the coming year will be better than the last.

In that spirit of optimism, I have reflected on some resolutions as a lawyer.

  1. Improve Health – But, make it specific in some way. Like resolving to run in a 10k race later in the year.
  2. Sharpen Communication – Work to better client and colleague communication and consultation.
  3. Provide Recognition – It takes little effort to recognize the efforts of those around you, and to provide praise, and celebrate achievements.
  4. Finish CPD – Do those Continuing Professional Development hours early and before it becomes a worry.
  5. Get Organized – Attend to that one matter that you routinely avoid. Admit it. You have one.
  6. Manage Time – Make it specific in some way. Hold incoming emails until later in the day, instead of constantly interrupting workflow.
  7. Embrace New Technologies – It takes time and is anxiety making, but is usually a benefit. This is then followed by Cybersecurity nervousness.
  8. Seize the Future – Think about the future in a different way. Law and work itself have changed significantly in the last year. Such as working from home.
  9. Drink Less. The pandemic put an end to in-person networking, seminars, and social events but, this might be followed by more drinking. After the “Spanish Flu” it was the “Roaring Twenties”.
  10. Be Grateful – That the last year is over and although we all still have to be vigilant, this pandemic will end.

Studies have shown that only a small percentage of New Year’s resolutions actually get implemented! Good luck!

Thanks for reading!

James Jacuta

28 Nov

Supreme Court Advocacy

David M Smith Continuing Legal Education, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, General Interest, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

I was able to attend a recent CPD program by the Advocate’s Society titled “Supreme Court of Canada Advocacy.”

A powerful keynote address was presented by the Honourable Madam Justice Suzanne Côté of the Supreme Court of Canada. Justice Côté’s remarks included an inside look at what lies behind the Supreme Court of Canada’s “big mahogany doors,” as she so eloquently phrased it. The Honourable Marshall Rothstein, Q.C., then spoke about the unwritten rules to getting leave to appeal.

Debate was had over the need for a script. Most panelists supported coming prepared with a script but cautioned against being married to it. When it comes to answering questions, advocates should see this as an opportunity to get off their script and engage in a dialogue with the bench. As Justice Côté points out, an oral argument is not supposed to be a monolog.

After discussion on the power of oral advocacy, the discussion shifted to the importance of the written argument. Although the factum is a critical component of any appeal, parties are under no obligation to reach the maximum page length. It was suggested that some of the most successful arguments can be made in 25 pages or less.

In addition to the factum, the Condensed Book can be a vital tool for advocates appearing before the Supreme Court. Under the Supreme Court rules, the Condensed Book may contain a two page outline of the oral argument. Preparing the this two page outlines forces advocates to truly narrow down their key points.

The panelists also spoke about the important role interveners can have in a case. Within the confines of a 10 page factum, and 5 minutes of oral argument, an intervenor can illustrate why a matter is of public interest, and provide supplemental answers to questions posed to the parties by the Justices. Interveners can play a critical role, and should not be overlooked.

Finally, the panel highlighted the power of a moot. Practice moots are one of the most valuable tools an advocate can use to prepare their case. The Supreme Court Advocacy Institute offers moot sessions where participants have the opportunity to moot their case before a panel of experienced litigators and retired justices.

Thanks for reading,

David Morgan Smith

27 Sep

Back to Basics: Is This Testamentary?

Doreen So Continuing Legal Education, Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Pursuant to section 2 of Part I of the Succession Law Reform Act,

“A person may by will devise, bequeath or dispose of all property (whether acquired before or after making his or her will) to which at the time of his or her death he or she is entitled either at law or in equity…”

The interpretation of the term “will” is defined under section 1 of the Act to include,

Testamentary documents, what constitutes a valid will?
“A person may by will devise, bequeath or dispose of all property (whether acquired before or after making his or her will) to which at the time of his or her death he or she is entitled either at law or in equity…”

“(a) a testament,

(b) a codicil,

(c) an appointment by will or by writing in the nature of a will in exercise of a power, and

(d) any other testamentary disposition.”

The question of what constitutes a will was a topic of the recent Law Society of Upper Canada Practice Gems: Probate Essentials 2016 program on September 20, 2016 (click here if you are interested in a copy of the program’s agenda).

As an example from the program materials, Canada Permanent Trust Co v Bowman, [1962] SCR 711 was a case in which the Supreme Court of Canada found a handwritten document in a cardboard box of the deceased’s home to be valid where, “read as a whole”, the document showed the implicit intention of a testator who wished for certain dispositions of her property following her death.  The document in question listed certain people with dollar amounts or items beside each name, such as, “Ena $1,000.00 in National Trust” and “Laura—fur coat”.

An even more famous example may be found in Ian Hull’s prior blog on the testamentary disposition that was carved on the bumper of a tractor by an unfortunate farmer while he was trapped under its weight.  The farmer did not survive and following engraving can be discerned from the bumper, “In case I die in this mess, I leave all to the wife. Cecil Geo Harris.”

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

 

01 Oct

New Mandatory Continuing Professional Development Requirements

Hull & Hull LLP Continuing Legal Education, General Interest Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

 

Commencing January 1, 2011, lawyers and paralegals in Ontario must complete at least 12 hours of continuing professional development (“CPD”) in eligible educational activities in each calendar year. At least 3 of the 12 hours must be on topics related to ethics, professionalism and/or practice management.

New members in their first two full years of practising law or providing legal services are required to take 12 hours per year of programming that integrates topics related to ethics, professionalism, and practice management for at least 25% of the program. This component must be reasonably connected to the substantive or procedural law content of the program.

All programming must be accredited by the Law Society. There are a variety of activities that may qualify for credit so you can count preparation for and presentation at CPD programs as well as attendance. Activities other than courses must be accredited in advance by LSUC in order to qualify for professionalism credit. Lawyers and paralegals seeking accreditation of activities such as teaching, writing, study groups, or mentoring must complete an Application for Accreditation of Alternate Eligible Educational Activities a minimum of 30 days in advance of the commencement date of the proposed activity. For more information see the LSUC website.

It will be interesting to see the changes in programming and perhaps even the kinds of organizations that will be providing CPD programs with the new requirements. 

If all this talk about continuing education has you ready to come out to mingle with your colleagues and discuss all things estates, Hull & Hull LLP’s breakfast series continues on October 14, 2010.    

Sharon Davis – Click here for more information on Sharon Davis.

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