Tag: cognitive impairment

07 Oct

How Long Will You Live? Plan for Longer Life Expectancy

Natalia R. Angelini General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Life expectancy has unsurprisingly been on the rise over the course of the last several decades.  You would think with the superior quality of life many currently experience that there is hope for more people to live up to 100 and beyond.  After all, the Guinness World Record for the longest living person is held by Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at age 122!

Photo of an old woman, Life expectancy is increasing, the longest living person died at 122.
“…the Guinness World Record for the longest living person is held by Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at age 122!”

However, Ms. Calment’s status as a supercentenarian is a rarity.  Even more exceptional is her living into her 120s.  No one else has been verified as doing so.  Further, it was recently reported that researchers calculate 115 to likely be the maximum life-span.  Without a breakthrough that fixes age-related problems, the new research apparently indicates that living beyond this age is not probable.

Some geneticists disagree, taking the view that as there has been success in extending the life and health of certain laboratory animals, the same may be achievable for humans.  With technological advances may come innovations that will meaningfully impact longevity.

The debate about whether this is achievable is expected to continue.  Nonetheless, we know that people are generally living longer and, coupled with this, will have more pressure on their financial resources, as well as the increased likelihood of mental decline.  So I believe it to be prudent to encourage our clients to seek the appropriate professional advice on how to plan for a longer retirement or an extended work-life, as well as for coping with cognitive impairment.  Some suggestions with respect to the latter include:

  • appoint your Powers of Attorney(s);
  • make a Will;
  • designate beneficiaries on your bank and investment accounts;
  • have life insurance in place;
  • simplifying your finances (e.g. consolidate accounts);
  • create an inventory of assets; and
  • perhaps most important, communicate with your family.

Thanks for reading and have a great weekend,

Natalia Angelini

03 May

Cognitive Screening Tools

Hull & Hull LLP Capacity, Estate & Trust, Health / Medical Tags: , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In the course of reviewing medical records in advance of estate litigation, one will encounter a wide variety of cognitive screening tools used to identify cognitive impairment. A handful of these tools are described here:

Confusion Assessment Method (CAM): an ICU assessment tool used to detect the presence or absence of delirium. A CAM assessment is usually carried out once every 8-12 hours (once per nursing shift). Results are presented as either ‘CAM-positive’, or ‘CAM-negative’, indicating the presence or absence of delirium, respectively.
Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE): a quantitative measure of cognitive status in adults. Despite its well-documented limitations, the MMSE is the most widely used standardized cognitive screening test in both clinical practice and research. Scores (out of a maximum 30 points) are paired with an associated level of impairment, i.e. no impairment, mild impairment, moderate impairment or severe impairment.
The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA): a rapid cognitive screening instrument used to detect mild cognitive impairment. This user-friendly tool assesses attention and concentration, executive functions (these are the high-level abilities that control more basic abilities and behaviours), memory, language, conceptual thinking, visuoconstructional skills, calculation and orientation. Studies have shown the MoCA to be far more sensitive than the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) in its ability to detect mild cognitive impairment.

There are dozens of other cognitive screens in use including the Mini-Cog, the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS), the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), the Memory Impairment Screen (MIS), and the recently published Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE). In the context of a dispute regarding testamentary capacity, cognitive screening results are valuable for the estate practitioner, in that they provide tangible, measurable, time-sensitive information regarding the testator’s cognitive functioning, and serve as a tool for assessing the progression of the impairment.

Jennifer Hartman, guest blogger
 

24 Jan

A Devastating Inheritance: Huntington’s Disease

Hull & Hull LLP Capacity, Estate & Trust, General Interest, Health / Medical Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, degenerative brain disorder that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste away. Huntington’s is inherited, and if one of your parents has Huntington’s disease, you would have a 50% chance of getting the gene for the disease. Everyone who carries the gene will develop the disease. Since the HD gene was isolated in 1993, one can be tested to see if they are a carrier, however because there is no cure for HD, some people choose not to be tested.

About 1 in 10,000 Canadians has HD.

There are two types of HD: i) adult-onset, the most common form, with symptom onset in the mid 30s and 40s; and ii) early onset, which accounts for about 16% of all HD cases, with symptoms developing in childhood or adolescence.

Huntington’s disease is associated with three types of symptoms:

· Movement symptoms, referred to as chorea, which consist of jerking, involuntary movements (‘tics’) of the limbs, trunk or face;
· Cognitive symptoms including a gradual impairment of concentration, memory, judgment, reasoning, decision-making and learning. This cognitive decline starts in a very subtle fashion, but eventually results in dementia; and
· Psychiatric symptoms may include depression, and psychotic behaviours such as delusions, hallucinations, paranoia and inappropriate outbursts.

HD usually runs its course in about 10 to 30 years, with a strong correlation between an earlier onset and a more rapid progression of the disease.

Jennifer Hartman, Guest Blogger
 

01 Apr

Insights on Aging and the Elderly Seminar – Hull on Estate and Succession Planning Podcast #106

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Listen to Insights on Aging and the Elderly Seminar

This week on Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Ian talks about a seminar he attended and participated in last week called ‘Insights on Aging and the Elderly’. The seminar was hosted by B’nai Brith and featured Dr. Nathan Herrmann, Ian Hull, Rabbi Roy D. Tanenbaum and Charles B. Wagner.

READ MORE

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET