Tag: Canadian Wills

30 Jun

Why Most Canadians Don’t Have a Will

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate Planning, Wills Tags: , 0 Comments

Most things in life are not guaranteed, but one thing most definitely is – death. Although that may be an unpleasant thought for many, we cannot escape from this inevitable truth and should become more comfortable talking about and planning for it.

While a large part of the Canadian population had previously ignored the need for estate planning, the COVID-19 pandemic encouraged people to change their thinking and realize the importance of doing so. In fact, many Canadians took matters into their own hands.

According to a poll conducted by the Angus Reid Institute in 2018, 51% of Canadians did not have a will in place before the pandemic. There were several reasons to explain this lack of estate planning, with the majority being summarized below:

  • 25% think they don’t need to worry about it because they’re “too young”
  • 23% feel it isn’t worth their time because they don’t have enough assets
  • 18% think it’s too expensive to get a will made
  • 8% don’t want to think about dying
  • 5% think it’s too time consuming

There have been general studies conducted to find out why people hesitate to make a will. It has been determined that many people are simply avoiding making tough decisions. But why spend time working hard to accumulate assets during your lifetime only to risk having them be distributed without any consideration of your wishes?

There is no harm in starting your estate planning “early” and then periodically reviewing and updating your will and estate plan after a framework has been established. Revisiting plans every five years, as frequently recommended, would greatly reduce the difficulty and time that would be spent once you are older with a larger and more complicated estate.

As well, the expense that can later be incurred as a result of estate litigation is likely to be higher than the cost of making a will now. Alternatively, if you don’t have a large estate, you can make a simple will yourself, although one should be weary of the complications that arise from not seeking professional advice.

The Coronavirus was the wake-up call many Canadians needed to start thinking about their own estate plans. While it is a relief that the pandemic may soon be behind us, the threat of death never truly goes away. Estate planning is a life-long conversation that should be normalized so that one can ultimately “rest in peace” whenever the time may come.

Suzana Popovic-Montag and Ekroop Sekhon

20 May

Equality and the Debate Over Statutory Wills

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate & Trust Tags: , , 0 Comments

Amidst this terrible COVID-19 pandemic, as with past crises and other contentious affairs, we see the steady emergence of dichotomies in the policy debate – public health versus the economy, liberty versus protection, individual versus group interests … In some cases, however, we see disputes arise wherein two sides share the same source of inspiration but disagree upon how best to do justice to their ostensibly common cause. Many of history’s religious wars demonstrate this phenomenon – two factions purportedly fighting for the same god, but interpreting the god rather differently. In the context of estates law, this phenomenon is discernible in the commentary surrounding statutory wills in Canada: proponents of statutory wills want to incorporate them in our law out of concern for incapable people’s equality rights, while critics of statutory wills oppose their introduction out of concern for incapable people’s equality rights.

A statutory will, in essence, allows for a judge to execute, revoke or amend a testamentary instrument on behalf of an incapable person. They are often praised for their tax advantages, as they may include testamentary trusts and other tax-avoiding instruments (avoid not evade, an important distinction for the C.R.A.) that are not available to incapable people if their estates devolve under intestacies. The drafter of a statutory will may also arrange a statutory will in a manner that will tend to preserve the affection of an incapable person’s relatives – no spurned children or blindsided spouses, in other words.

There is more controversy with respect to whether statutory wills should be used to “protect”. In one prominent English case, Re Davey, [1980] 3 AII E.R. 342, a 92-year-old incapable woman, who was residing in a nursing home, married one the nursing home’s employees, a man 45 years her junior. The woman’s relatives, alarmed at the prospect of the man gaining everything on an intestacy, applied to the court for a statutory will, and won.

Critics of statutory wills observe that since courts cannot interfere with the testamentary freedom of the capable, they should not have the power to commandeer and transform the estate plans of the incapable. Perhaps, as well, skeptics are wary of variable outcomes (i.e. how judges will devise statutory wills), which may flow from what they may perceive as an excess of judicial discretion – unlike an intestacy, the terms of which are definite and predictable; a similar debate is often had with respect to minimum sentences in criminal law, which boils down to, as with statutory wills, how one balances trust for legislators with trust for judicial discretion, to achieve the best results.

In Canada, only New Brunswick has a statutory will. Section 11.1 of the New Brunswick Infirm Persons Act emphasises that courts must act in concert with what incapable people would want, if competent to make a will themselves. In somewhat of a legal bombshell, however, the Manitoba Law Reform Commission has favoured the adoption of a statutory will in Manitoba’s Wills Act.

Thank you for reading … have a wonderful Wednesday!

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Devin McMurtry

06 Dec

B.C. Court Admits Computer File to Probate

Paul Emile Trudelle Estate Litigation, Wills Tags: , , 0 Comments

In a decision out of the Supreme Court of British Columbia, a computer file prepared by the deceased was accepted as a will and admitted to probate. Applying the curative provisions of the Wills, Estates and Succession Act, S.B.C. 2009, c. 13 (“WESA”), which came into force on March 31, 2014, the court was able to conclude that the computer record represented the deceased’s full and final testamentary intentions.

In Hubschi Estate (Re), 2019 BCSC 2040 (CanLII), the deceased died after a short illness. No formal will was found. However, his family was able to locate a Word document on his computer labelled “Budget for 2017”. In that computer file, there was the following statement: “Get a will made out at some point. A 5-way assets split for remaining brother and sisters. Greg and Annette or Trevor as executor.”

By way of family background, the deceased was given up by his birth mother at birth to Children’s Aid. At age 3, the deceased was placed in a foster home with the Stacks. He grew up in the Stack house, and was extremely close to his foster parents and 5 foster siblings. He was treated by the immediate and extended Stack family as a member of the family. Upon his foster mother’s death, her estate was divided into 6 shares, with one share passing to the deceased.

On the other hand, if the document was not found to be a will, the deceased’s estate would pass on an intestacy, and would pass to his birth mother’s sister, with whom the deceased had no contact whatsoever.

The court reviewed a number of decisions applying WESA. The court observed that the purpose of the curative provisions in WESA was to avoid the injustice of a deceased’s testamentary intentions being defeated for no good reason other than strict non-compliance with execution and attestation formalities.

In order to obtain probate of a non-compliant document, the propounder must demonstrate (1) that the testamentary document is authentic, and (2) that the testamentary document contains the full, final and fixed intention of the will-maker. The court found that both of these requirements were met in the Hubschi case.

Previously, I blogged on an Australian case where an unsent text message was admitted to probate under similar legislation. Read about it here. This decision was referred to by the court in Hubschi.

For better or for worse, Ontario legislation does not allow for substantial compliance with the formalities of will execution, and strict compliance is required. While this may lead to greater certainty, it also means that the testamentary intentions of a will-maker are often disregarded where there is not strict compliance with the formal requirements of execution.

 

Have a great weekend.

Paul Trudelle

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