Tag: Bill C-7

22 Mar

Bill C-7 Sparks Strong Pushback from Disability-Rights Organizations 

Suzana Popovic-Montag In the News Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

On November 18, 2020, we blogged about medical assistance in dying (“MAID”) accessibility. We discussed Bill C-7 and the government’s proposal to expand eligibility for assisted death. The government’s proposal was accepted by the Senate on March 17, 2021 and, as such, Bill C-7 is now in effect.

Our previous blog post largely centered on arguments in support of increasing MAID accessibility. What it did not consider was the controversy sparked by Bill C-7, especially in marginalized communities such as the disabled community.

Bill C-7 was initially proposed after a 2019 Superior Court of Quebec decision held that it was unconstitutional to limit MAID to those at the end of their lives. Accessibility to MAID has now been expanded as some of the more onerous conditions have been alleviated. Those eligible to receive MAID now include individuals suffering intolerably from severe illnesses and disabilities with no cure.

Those with disabilities and advocates of this community are concerned that MAID will disproportionately be accessed by individuals with disabilities who do not otherwise have access to adequate social supports. Proponents of the amendments to the legislation argue that there are safeguards in place to protect the floodgates from opening and to protect against legislative abuse. For example, patients who request MAID but are not nearing the end of their life will be informed of various social and communal supports which can assist in alleviating their suffering. However, there is no requirement necessitating those considering MAID to actually access these supports. Further, Bill C-7 requires medical professionals to conclude that the person applying for MAID has given “serious consideration” to their decision. Opponents of the Bill question the subjectivity and ambiguity of this loose requirement … what would actually amount to “serious consideration”?

Are there enough protective measures in place? Are these proposals encouraging ableism and fueling already pervasive stereotypes in our society?

Disability-rights organizations would answer the former in the negative and the latter in the affirmative. On February 24, 2021, over 125 Canadian organizations signed an open letter urging the government to reconsider the amendments proposed in Bill C-7. The letter states that “Bill C-7 sets apart people with disabilities and disabling conditions as the only Canadians to be offered assistance in dying when they are not actually dying.” Studies have shown that individuals with disabilities have higher rates of depression and more frequent occurrences of suicidal thoughts in comparison to the general public. Those who oppose Bill C-7 argue that the underlying causes of suffering must be addressed, such as the institutional and social problems causing suffering. They argue that these problems often outweigh any physical suffering.

Of course, not all individuals with disabilities find Bill C-7 to be offensive. For some, the expansion of MAID represents hope and the prevention of intolerable suffering. Suffering is subjective and individuals will now be able to decide when/if their suffering becomes too intolerable. For these people, MAID is a humane exit from a life that is too unbearable to be endured.

Thank you for reading, and enjoy the rest of your day,

Suzana Popovic-Montag and Tori Joseph

18 Nov

MAID Accessibility

Suzana Popovic-Montag General Interest, In the News Tags: , , 0 Comments

Dying with Dignity (DWD) Canada, a not-for-profit organization, has noted a rise in calls from Canadians inquiring about medical assistance in dying (MAID) since the start of the pandemic.

The individuals calling DWD are largely concerned about the prospect of dying an uncomfortable death from Covid-19. Since MAID is only available to a small group of individuals who meet the rigorous conditions set out in Canada’s assisted dying law, Helen Long, CEO of DWD Canada, urges people to complete an advanced care directive to ensure their end of life wishes are met. Advanced care planning advice, and specifically how it relates to Covid-19, can be found on the Dying with Dignity website.

Other DWD callers express concerns about the difficulty of accessing the healthcare system during the Covid-19 pandemic. These callers worry about whether they will be able to in fact access MAID programs when needed. For example, in March of 2020, some MAID services were shut down in Ottawa and Hamilton to prevent the spread of Covid-19 and to preserve health-care resources. However, other regions have deemed MAID to be an essential service and have implemented safety protocols to ensure adequate protection for clinicians conducting this service.

Some long term care homes reject MAID on religious grounds and, therefore, will not allow the services to be conducted on their property. It is clear that MAID has become increasingly difficult to access for many people.

Currently, Bill C-7 is before the House of Commons. Bill C-7 contains the government’s proposal to expand eligibility for assisted death. One way that the government seeks to do so is by modifying the current stringent requirement of a “reasonably foreseeable death.” Although Bill C-7 would maintain the general notion of a reasonably foreseeable death as a precondition to accessing MAID, it would establish more lenient eligibility requirements for those who are near death. Bill C-7 seeks to make MAID more accessible by alleviating some of the more burdensome conditions that presently need to be met.

Under the current assisted dying regime, 6,465 medically assisted deaths are expected in Canada in 2021. This legislation would enable almost 1200 more medically assisted deaths. These were the numerical predictions expected prior to the pandemic. The exact number of additional requests for MAID due to Covid-19 remains to be seen.

Thanks for reading … Enjoy the rest of your day.

Suzana Popovic-Montag & Tori Joseph

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