Tag: Attorney General

21 Aug

Hull on Estates #553 – Who is the Children’s Lawyer?

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This week on Hull on Estates, Jonathon Kappy and Nick Esterbauer discuss the role of the Children’s Lawyer in Ontario and the recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal in Ontario (Children’s Lawyer) v Ontario (Information and Privacy Commissioner).

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Jonathon Kappy.

Click here for more information on Nick Esterbauer.

16 Feb

Guardianship of Property of Minor Children

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There are numerous situations where money might become payable to a minor child. For example, the child may be the beneficiary under a Will, RRSP, or insurance policy. Alternatively, he or she may have received funds through a court Order or settlement.

You might be surprised to know that in Ontario, while a parent is automatically his or her child’s guardian of the person, he or she is not automatically the child’s guardian of property. The only way for a parent to receive this authority is by statute, court Order, or other document, such as a Will.

Although the Office of the Children’s Lawyer  represents minor children in property rights cases, it does not have the authority to act as guardian of property for minors. This means that unless a parent or guardian obtains the legal authority to receive funds for a child, then money to which the child becomes entitled will have to be paid into court and held by the Accountant of the Superior Court of Justice until the minor reaches eighteen years of age.

If money has been paid into court, the parent will have to apply to be appointed the minor’s guardian of property in order to withdraw it. Alternatively, if the funds are required for the direct benefit of the child, and the parent cannot afford the expense, the Office of the Children’s Lawyer has a procedure to request payments out of court.

For more information about the guardianship of property of minor children, you will find the information on the Ministry of the Attorney General’s website to be of use.

I hope you enjoyed my blogs this week. Have a great weekend!

Megan Connolly

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