For the many who take on the fiduciary role of an attorney for property, there is often little or no education received on one’s duties and obligations. The sole guidance often provided is from the language of the power of attorney document itself.  It is rare, I would expect, that an attorney seeks out independent legal advice on the issue, which may in part be why we see so many cases in our practice where attorney spending is challenged. This blog serves as a refresher on the issue.

Obligated Spending

The legislation (Section 37(1) of the Substitute Decisions Act (“SDA”)) provides that a guardian or attorney for property must make certain expenditures out of the assets of the incapable person, listed in priority as being:

  1. Expenditures reasonably necessary for the person’s support, education and care.
  2. Expenditures reasonably necessary for the support, education and care of the person’s dependants (“dependant” is defined as a person to whom the incapable person has an obligation to provide support).
  3. Expenditures that are necessary to satisfy the person’s other legal obligations.

The expenditures may only be made if the assets of the incapable person are sufficient to satisfy them.  The guiding principles are that the value of the property, the accustomed standard of living of the incapable person and his or her dependants and the nature of other legal obligations are to be taken into account.

Optional Expenditures

An attorney may make gifts or loans to the person’s friends and relatives, and may make gifts to charities (Section 37(3) of the SDA).  The policy guidelines include:

  1. Gifts or loans may be made only if there is reason to believe, based on the intentions expressed prior to becoming incapable, that he/she would have made these gifts if capable.
  2. Charitable gifts may be made only if, (i) the incapable person authorized the making of charitable gifts in the power of attorney document, or (ii) there is evidence that the person made similar expenditures when capable.
  3. The gift shall not be made if the incapable person expresses a wish to the contrary.
  4. The SDA sets limits on the quantum of charitable gifts.

With these parameters in mind, coupled with carefully documenting all expenditures and retaining supporting vouchers, an attorney for property can hope to have a smoother ride when satisfying accounting obligations in respect of the administration.

Thanks for reading and have a great day,

Natalia R. Angelini

 

Some other blog posts that might interest you are:

How Generous may an Attorney for Property Be?

Power of Attorney Disputes on the Rise?

Choosing the Wrong Attorney for Property