Tag: art

22 Oct

Art Reunited: A Tale of an Indefinite Administration

Doreen So Disappointed Beneficiaries, General Interest, In the News, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

I’ve always loved a good story.  I found this story from CNN particularly intriguing as it has to do with art that was stolen by the Nazis, and how this stolen piece of art eventually made its way to the U.S. just like its family had done after the Nazis came to power.

According to the Mosse Art Restitution Project, Rudolf Mosse was a successful Jewish entrepreneur in the late 19th and early 20th century.  He had a large publishing and advertising business that included the publication of 130 newspapers and journals.  In 1900, Mosse purchased “Winter” directly from the artist, Gari Melchers, at the Great Berlin Art Exhibit.  Mosse later died in 1920.  The sole heir of his estate was his daughter, Felicia Lachmann-Mosse.  Thus, Felicia came to own Mosse’s extensive art collection.  Felicia and her husband also took over and ran one of Mosse’s most prominent publications, Berliner Tageblatt, and the newspaper was renowned for its criticism of Adolf Hilter.  When Hilter came to power in 1933, Felicia and her husband were forced to leave Germany.  According to CNN, “Winter” was amongst the art that was seized by the Nazis when the Mosse family fled their home but “Winter” was only one painting out of the hundreds of pieces of artwork that were stolen at the time.

Some of this art was auctioned off by the Nazis; some have simply disappeared.  “Winter” left the Nazis’ possession and changed hands a number of times before Barlett Arkell bought it, as an innocent purchaser who was none the wiser, from a prominent gallery in 1934.  Since 1934, “Winter” has been displayed in the Arkell Museum in Canajoharie, New York.  When the Museum discovered that “Winter” was taken illegally from its original owner, the painting was surrendered to the FBI in 2019.

“Winter” has since been reunited with the Mosse family by way of the Mosse Foundation which represents the remaining heirs of Felicia Lachmann-Mosse.  To date, the Mosse Art Restitution Project remains actively engaged in their work to recover all of the artwork that was stolen by the Nazis.

The Mosse Foundation and the Project have plans to auction “Winter” in the near future and it is estimated to be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Talk about a never-ending estate administration.

Thanks for reading!

Doreen So

02 Jul

Thoughts About Art

Hull & Hull LLP Executors and Trustees, In the News Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

With so much taking place around us now, I forced myself to choose a topic for today’s blog that, although still estates related (this being, after all, an estates blog), allows me to think about something beautiful.  I landed on art.

Full disclosure: I have blogged about art and estates before.  See here and here for some shameless self-promotion.  Without wanting to revisit these topics, I did some searching and was intrigued by this Financial Times article about the Art Loss Register (ALR).

The ALR is the world’s largest private database for lost and stolen art, antiques, and collectibles.  Their services are essentially twofold.  First, the ALR assists to deter the theft of art by promoting the registration of all items of valuable possession on its database and also the expansion of checking searches.  Second, by operating a due diligence service to sellers of art, the ALR operates a recovery service to return works of art to their rightful owners.  In addition, the ALR has expanded to negotiate compensation to the victims of art theft and the legitimising of current ownership.

In addition to art dealers, insurers, and museums, the ALR also assists private individuals including beneficiaries and trustees.  A trustee who is intending to liquidate art may wish to rely on the ALR to prove title and authenticity, thereby potentially increasing value and mitigating risk of fraud.

Noah Weisberg

If you find this topic to be interesting, please consider these other related blogs:

01 Oct

Art & Taxes (& Estates)

Hull & Hull LLP Estate Planning Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I try to seize every opportunity I can to learn about art.  In preparing today’s blog, I was intrigued to read about the UK’s Cultural Gifts Scheme and its relationship to estates.

The Cultural Gifts Scheme & Acceptance in Lieu allows UK taxpayers to donate important works of art and other heritage objects in return for a tax reduction, which includes inheritance tax.  The donated work is then held for the benefit of the public or the nation at an eligible museum or gallery.  According to this article from the Guardian, the Scheme was first introduced in 1910 as a way of allowing individuals to offset inheritance tax bills, and later, in 2013, to allow individuals to be able to make donations during their lifetime in order to offset future tax liabilities.

Any art admirer should have a look at the 2018-2019 Annual Report which provides a list of items that were received, along with some pretty pictures of the items :).  It is a feast for the eyes and the senses.  Some of the highlights include:

  • a Portrait of the Emperor Charles V by Peter Rubens, which has gone to the Royal Armouries in Leeds
  • a platinum and diamond necklace with black velvet ribbons, convertible to a brooch, made by Cartier in Paris c. 1908-1910, which has been allocated to the Victoria and Albert Museum
  • 361 botanical drawings by the illustrator Florence Helen Woolward
  • Bernardo Bellotto’s painting of Venice on Ascension Day, which settled £7 million of tax
  • Damien Hirst’s Wretched War sculpture, given by the artist’s former business manager Frank Dunphy settling £90,000 in tax

In Canada, although art can be subject to capital gains, and possibly other taxes, it is possible for a donor to limit, or avoid the tax altogether, including by way of claiming a charitable tax credit.  Individuals thinking about estate planning and/or donating art should seek the advice of a professional advisor to maximize the amount of savings.

Thanks for reading,
Noah Weisberg

If you consider this blog interesting, please see these other related blogs:

26 Jun

The estate sale – can it be a treasure island?

Suzana Popovic-Montag Beneficiary Designations, Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Tags: , , 0 Comments

We wrote several months ago about the declining value of household furniture and other items – especially antiques that were highly desired decades ago.

The general rule if you’re selling home assets (typically in an estate or when moving into a retirement home situation) is that you won’t get as much as you think. Tastes change (grandfather clock anyone?), artists fall out of favour (or never gain much market value) and items fall into disrepair. And you usually have to pay a firm to come in and assess and sell the contents. It may not leave you with much.

Mind the small stuff

What can often get overlooked in content sales is the little stuff. We all bring our personal biases when assessing what’s junk and what could be a little treasure. If you see a figurine or small carving and don’t like it, you’ll assume that others won’t like it either. Under the weight of all the other junk you have to dispose of, the item can end up in the trash.

That can be a costly mistake. I was recently visiting an estate home being prepared for sale, and the daughter of the deceased pointed to a small ceramic cat at the end of the mantle. It was, to me, nothing much of note. It was about 2 inches high and 3 inches long and had stripes. I wouldn’t have thought twice about trashing it if I was clearing out the house.

That’s what the daughter thought too, until they had a friend over who identified the cat as an original ceramic piece by Swedish artist Lisa Larson. What was going to end up in the trash was actually a small sculpture worth hundreds of dollars. Oops …

Be mindful of the art-savvy owner

If a homeowner had a good eye for art during their lifetime, there’s a good chance that even small knick-knacks were bought with purpose and could have value. So, before you clear the little stuff off the mantle of someone’s home, it may pay to have an art-savvy friend tour the house just in case.

Thanks for reading – enjoy your day,
Suzana Popovic-Montag

25 Mar

Calling All Philanthropists: Thinking of Donating Your Art?

Christina Canestraro Uncategorized Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Whether art, history, science, or fashion is your thing, a trip to the museum is a sure-fire way to  marvel at the ingenuity of humankind, spark new inspiration, or escape to a different time and place. It’s no wonder one of the world’s most popular museums, the Louvre, welcomed 10.2 million visitors in 2018 from all over the world.

Whether motivated by the desire to preserve heritage and culture, or a passion for education, according to this New York Times article, philanthropists have been instrumental in the exponential growth in museums that we have observed, particularly in the last 50 years.

Some donors gift their collectibles to an institution while alive, with conditional terms to the acceptance of their donation. Take, for example, philanthropist Wendy Reves who donated more than 1,400 works from the collection of her late husband to the Dallas Museum of Art, with the stipulation that they recreate five rooms from the couple’s villa in the South of France, including furnishings from the villa’s original owner, Coco Chanel. 

Other donors gift their collections from beyond the grave. In other words, they include specific provisions in their will donating their works to a particular institution, also known as a bequest. In 1967, the late Adelaide Milton de Groot, bequeathed her entire art collection (which contained more than 200 paintings) to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

While American museums are beholden to important donors, they are also running out of space to properly store and preserve items not on display. In fact, many American museums only showcase approximately 4% of their inventory, with the balance held in climate-controlled storage spaces. To address this issue, many American museums have taken to formally disposing of part of their inventory, a term also known as deaccessioning.

 

Institutions such as the Canadian Museums Association are hopeful that the new changes will mean more tax incentives for donors and more artwork being donated.

Conversely, Canadian museums are facing challenges on the acquisition side. For the last 30 or so years, the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (CPEIA) earned Canadian donors tax credits for the market value of their donated art as long as it fell within the scope of “national importance”. This incentivized Canadian donors to bequeath their art to Canadian museums, which ensured that important cultural property remained in Canada for the benefit of Canadians.

Recently, the federal court decision in Heffel Gallery Limited v Canada (AG) narrowed the definition of national importance in the CPEIA, meaning millions of dollars in artwork donations to museums and art galleries were halted. As explained in this article, the newly proposed Budget 2019, “proposes to amend the Income Tax Act and the Cultural Property Export and Import Act to remove the requirement that property be of ‘national importance’ in order to qualify for the enhanced tax incentives for donations of cultural property.” This is good news for both donors and museums.

It is still too early to know how these changes will manifest in practice, given that Heffel Gallery Limited v Canada (AG) is still under appeal, and Budget 2019 has not yet passed. Institutions such as the Canadian Museums Association are hopeful that the new changes will mean more tax incentives for donors and more artwork being donated.

All this to say, if you have a Basquiat or Degas yearning to be seen by the masses, it may just have its chance to shine, with significant tax breaks to your estate!

Thanks for reading!

Christina Canestraro

02 Feb

Vivian Maier: An Intestate Artist of Posthumous Renown

Doreen So Estate Planning, General Interest, In the News, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

I recently watched the documentary Finding Vivian Maier (which was originally released in 2013) and I was struck by John Maloof’s search for anyone who could tell him about who Vivian Maier truly was after her death.   After her death, Vivian Maier (February 1, 1926 – April 21, 2009) gained fame as an American, Chicago-based, street photographer.  During Vivian Maier’s lifetime, she was simply known to those around her as a nanny, and perhaps an eccentric with a camera around her neck.

Vivian Maier’s art was entirely discovered posthumously and it all began when John Maloof attended a local auction house in Chicago and bought 30,000 negatives for another project.  In the course of considering whether the negatives were suitable for Maloof’s book on the history of the Northwest Side neighbour of Chicago, Maloof later became “obsessed with Vivian’s work, and made it his mission to reconstruct her archive”.

The documentary is a chronicle of Maloof’s mission to reconstruct her archive (and of Vivian Maier, herself), including how he found records of her birth from a New York City archive and how Maloof ended up in an remote village in France where her mother’s family lived.

Vivian Maier died unmarried and childless and, as it turns out, intestate.

According to the Chicago Tribune, a Virginia copyright lawyer and former professional photographer named David Deal became concerned that people were selling Vivian Maier’s photographs in manner that infringed copyright law.  David Deal used the information that he learned from Maloof’s chronicles to locate one of Vivian Maier’s first cousins once removed.  In 2014, David Deal became counsel to Francis Baille in a court case where Mr. Baille asked the probate court to name him as an heir to the Estate of Vivian Maier.  Apparently, the information that David Deal used was the story of how Maloof had located another first cousin named Sylvian Jaussaud  by hiring genealogists.  As Maloof’s story goes, he bought Sylvian Jaussaud’s rights to Vivian Maier’s work for $5,000.00.   Ultimately, Mr. Baille’s court case, which involved John Maloof and the Cook County public administrator’s office (the county where Vivian Maier died), settled under private terms that are sealed from the public.

In Ontario, where a person dies without a will, and there is no surviving spouse, children, parent, brother or sister, the property shall be distributed among the nephews and nieces.  If there are no surviving nephews and nieces either, “the property shall be distributed among the next of kin of equal degree of consanguinity to the intestate equally without representation”.  If there are no next of kin either, the property becomes the property of the Crown, and the Escheats Act, 2015 applies”.

For those of you who are interested, I highly recommend watching the trailer to Finding Vivian Maier here, and checking out some of Vivian Maier’s photographs here.

Thanks for reading (and watching)!

Doreen So

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