Tag: alternative dispute resolution

20 Apr

ADR Mentorship Circle: Building a Successful ADR Practice

Hull & Hull LLP News & Events Tags: , , 0 Comments

Mentoring plays a vital role in the development of competent practitioners. The need for mentorship has never been greater, especially now, as the practice of law evolves with the pandemic.

Come join Hull & Hull LLP’s Suzana Popovic-Montag, who will be presenting at the upcoming ADR Mentorship Circle program on April 22nd at 5:30 PM. As one of the country’s premier estate litigators with almost 25 years of litigation experience, she has successfully represented clients at every level of court, including the Supreme Court of Canada. Suzana will bring her extensive experience in Estate Law to students and members of the OBA.

Registration via the Ontario Bar Association can be found here.

Registrants are invited to select their top two practice areas of interest. Please email Janet Green at jgreen@oba.org to indicate your top two practice areas of interest.

Best efforts will be made to accommodate each registrant’s first choice.

12 Nov

Mediation or Arbitration – What’s the Difference?

Kira Domratchev Estate & Trust, Litigation Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In the estates regime, mediations occur regularly, particularly in Toronto, where mediations are a mandatory part of the litigation, in accordance with Rule 75.1.02(1)(a)(i) of the Rules of Civil Procedure.

A mediation is always an opportunity to attempt to settle a matter without resorting to costly and time consuming litigation. At mediation, the parties will each stay in separate rooms and the mediator (that is usually chosen by the parties to the litigation), will shuttle between the rooms seeking a more in-depth understanding of the parties’ positions as well as probing opportunities for settlement. Sometimes, before the mediation begins, the mediator will do an introduction to all the parties before they break off into separate rooms, explaining how the day will go.

An important aspect of mediation is the fact that a mediator has no decision-making power. He or she cannot force the parties to settle but can provide his or her opinion on the issues. As such, settlement at mediation can only be reached upon the agreement of the parties themselves.

Another means of dispute resolution (other than litigation) that is not often resorted to in estate litigation, is arbitration. Before agreeing to attend an arbitration, however, it is important to consider whether this form of dispute resolution would be helpful in the particular circumstances of the matter.

Arbitration, unlike mediation, is an adversarial dispute resolution process (similar to litigation) determined and controlled by a neutral third party. The arbitrator can make a final decision, called an “award”, contrary to a mediator, who cannot. The most significant aspect of arbitration, however, is that the courts generally do not interfere in a dispute that is subject to an arbitration agreement. As such, there is a risk that should a decision be made by an arbitrator, the court would then refuse to hear the matter further, leaving arbitration as the ultimate medium of resolving the particular matter.

Why is that so important?

In a situation where the parties have already engaged in settlement negotiations and there appears to be a gap between their respective positions, an arbitration may be worthwhile to pursue, particularly should litigation be untenable to the parties given the cost involved and/or if the matter in dispute does not involve a lot of money. In such a situation, a final arbitral award may bring finality and allow the parties to move on, particularly if the gap between the parties’ positions is not significant.

If, however, the parties had not yet engaged in negotiations and no offers to settle were made, pursuing arbitration may be a serious gamble. That is so because the issues to be arbitrated are set out by the parties and though the arbitration process is similar to traditional litigation, the arbitrator will not have an opportunity to hear all the relevant evidence. As a result, agreeing to arbitrate in a situation like that may cause prejudice to a client who may then not be able to appeal the “award” made by an arbitrator, outside of the regime put in place by the Arbitration Act, 1991, SO 1991, c 17.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Mandatory Mediation

Nine Mediation Pitfalls to Avoid

Arbitration: A Valuable Alternative

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
 

CONNECT WITH US

TRY HULL E-STATE PLANNER SOFTWARE

Hull e-State Planner is a comprehensive estate planning software designed to make the estate planning process simple, efficient and client friendly.

Try it here!

CATEGORIES

ARCHIVES

TWITTER WIDGET

  • Substantial Compliance and the Dalla Lana Decision Are you caught up on the changes to the Succession Law Reform A… https://t.co/dUxnFBSe35
  • Today's article: Substantial Compliance and the Dalla Lana Decision Read the full blog here:… https://t.co/s3c9YX1WFR
  • Interesting: Dependant support claims need to be served on “all interested parties” Read today's article to learn… https://t.co/sxqLVEWCu1
  • The @LawSocietyLSO provides assistance and guidance when you are trying to locate a Will. Read Last Friday's artic… https://t.co/hoJIrdbDVe
  • Thompson and Virtual Litigation Today's article explores the questions surrounding the fate of virtual litigation.… https://t.co/nQ4KgbPP2V
  • Last Thursday's article: Applying the new standard for limitation periods. Read the full blog here:… https://t.co/tiPOz7skaK