Tag: Alberta

11 Aug

Gathering Evidence for a Will Challenge

Suzana Popovic-Montag Estate & Trust, Litigation, Wills Tags: , , , , 0 Comments

Earlier this year, the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta directed that a party challenging a will may be able to obtain orders for disclosure before the Court determines whether the will must be proven in solemn form.

This case may be of interest in Ontario because the procedure for commencing a will challenge in Alberta and Ontario is relatively similar. If a party in either province wishes to challenge a will, that party must establish an evidentiary basis for doing so before a hearing will be ordered. In Ontario, the requirement to provide a “minimal evidentiary threshold” before a will must be proven in solemn form was reiterated by the Court of Appeal in Neuberger v. York, 2016 ONCA 191 (CanLII). The standard is worded differently in Alberta, where applicants must provide an evidentiary foundation to confirm that there is a “genuine issue to be tried” before the hearing of a will challenge will be ordered: see Quaintance v Quaintance (Estate), 2006 ABCA 47 (CanLII) and Logan Estate (Re), 2021 ABCA 6 (CanLII).

Evidence a party challenging a will in Alberta may obtain before a hearing is ordered:

In Gow Estate (Re), 2021 ABQB 305 (CanLII), the will dispute was between four of the deceased’s children. Two siblings were serving as the personal representatives of the estate, and two other siblings applied to challenge the deceased’s will on several bases, including undue influence. The personal representatives opposed the applicants’ request that the will be proven in solemn form.

The applicants also applied to the court for interim relief – an order that would permit them to question the personal representatives and obtain documentary disclosure, including the estate solicitors’ files, the deceased’s medical records and driver’s licence documents, previous wills, and other estate planning records, before the “threshold” application was heard. The personal representatives objected to the interim relief sought by the applicants on the basis that Alberta’s Surrogate Rules did not permit pre-application discovery and also argued that the testator’s privacy was to be respected unless the applicants proved that formal proof of the will was warranted in the circumstances.

Before the interim application was heard, the personal representatives also provided the applicant siblings with partial disclosure relating to the testator’s health, testamentary capacity and intentions, and estate planning, and also examined one of the applicant siblings in anticipation of the threshold application.

The interim application was heard by Justice Feth, who permitted both questioning and limited documentary disclosure, recognizing “the importance of early disclosure in surrogate disputes”. With respect to questioning, the Court confirmed that the personal representatives could be questioned “about their personal interactions with the testator during his lifetime, including their observations of his mental capacity and their involvement in his testamentary decision-making.” Justice Feth explained:

[47]           Access to pre-application questioning advances procedural fairness since the Applicants are obligated to meet an evidentiary burden and obtain corroboration through material evidence from other sources. In meeting their onus, measured litigation procedures should not be foreclosed to them.

[51]           Immunizing an adverse party from questioning is especially concerning when undue influence is raised. The living witness who is likely the most knowledgeable about the interactions with the testator would be hidden from the Court.

Justice Feth also observed that it would not be fair to permit the threshold application to be heard by the Court with only partial disclosure selected entirely by the personal representatives because of the potential for “a misleading presentation of the facts”.

Limited documentary disclosure of some of the deceased’s medical records and previous wills was also ordered in light of the partial disclosure already provided by the personal representatives. While Justice Feth acknowledged that individuals may have a significant privacy interest in their medical records, it was also recognized that such a privacy interest is not absolute and ordered the personal representatives to provide the applicant siblings with disclosure for the period during which the deceased’s testamentary capacity was in question.

Justice Feth acknowledged the potential for “[c]oncerns about fishing expeditions, the testator’s privacy interests, and excessive delay and expense occasioned by exuberant demands for disclosure” during the early stages of estate litigation, but held that those concerns could be managed by the Court rather than prohibiting early disclosure in surrogate proceedings.

Evidence a party challenging a will in Ontario may obtain before a hearing is ordered:

In comparison to Justice Feth’s decision, Ontario courts have in some recent instances been reluctant to provide documentary disclosure in will challenges during the preliminary stages of the litigation. In Seepa v Seepa, 2017 ONSC 5368 (CanLII), Justice Myers held that documentary disclosure should not occur until after a threshold will application has been granted. Recently, in McCormick v McCormick, 2021 ONSC 5177 (CanLII), Justice Wilcox described Justice Myers’ decision as follows:

[24]         In Seepa, Meyers J. expanded on the policy considerations behind the minimum evidentiary threshold requirement. It was to protect from lengthy, intrusive, expensive documentary collection and investigation proceedings untailored to the needs of the individual case and from intrusion into a deceased’s privileged legal files and personal medical records. In the face of these, a litigant was not to be given tools such as documentary discovery that are otherwise ordinarily available to a civil litigant before the litigant has produced some evidentiary basis to proceed.

In keeping with the Court’s decision in Seepa, in Young v Prychitko, 2021 ONSC 3150 (CanLII), Justice George declined to order documentary disclosure in the context of a will challenge, holding that the Court would not entertain a fishing expedition and compel production of documents before the minimal evidentiary threshold had been met. The firm’s blog post about the Court’s decision in Young v Prychitko can be accessed here.

While document disclosure prior to a threshold application may have recently been discouraged, some Ontario decisions have instead permitted cross-examination on affidavit evidence as a next step, as noted in Justice Wilcox’s decision in McCormick. The Court even noted in Young v Prychitko that the parties would be able to cross-examine each other on their affidavit evidence before the threshold issue, in that case, was decided.

Having said that, the practice of permitting parties to cross-examine each other on affidavit evidence before documentary disclosure may not always be optimal. In Shapiro v Shapiro, 2021 ONSC 4501 (CanLII), for example, Justice Hurley noted that cross-examination on an affidavit before documentary discovery in that particular case was “unlikely to accomplish anything of real benefit” and likely “would only add to the legal costs and beget delay” – the very danger that Justice Myers indicated the minimum evidentiary threshold requirement was intended to avoid. The will threshold application was determined in Shapiro without any cross-examination.

In light of these recent decisions by Ontario and Alberta Courts in which we have seen two conflicting approaches in the disclosure of medical records and other documentary disclosure, the minimal evidentiary threshold issue should remain top of mind to lawyers assisting clients with the early steps of a will challenge.

Thanks for reading!

Suzana Popovic-Montag

 

For further reading on threshold will challenges and the evidentiary burden, check out these other blog posts:

Request for Production or a Fishing Expedition?

Corroboration in Will Challenges: Overcoming the “Epic Hurdle”

Lessons from Neuberger Part 1: Does an interested person have an automatic right to proof in solemn form?

Another Will Challenge Threshold Case

Getting Over the Will Challenge Threshold: Applying Seepa v. Seepa

The Threshold for Will Challenges: Joma v Jaunkalns

25 Nov

Finders and Keepers and the Hidden Half-Million Dollars

Ian Hull General Interest Tags: , , , 0 Comments

In 1972, Bill and Mary Moroz purchased a humble single-story bungalow, in Edmonton, on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. They were the first and only occupants of the home and lived there the rest of their lives. William died in 2009 and in September of 2016, so did Mary.

Their nephew, William Smolak, was appointed personal representative of the Estate of Mary Moroz and set about preparing the house for sale. The house needed much work to clean and empty, but it was finally sold to Roger and Simone Gagne, and Christopher Short, who took possession on October 16, 2017.

Two days later, the new homeowners found $100,000 in a tin in a basement shoe cubby roughly 18” high.

Seven days after that, another $500,000 was found in more tins under the drawers in the basement kitchen. The Gagnes and Mr. Short did not contact the realtor or Mr. Smolak to tell them they had made this rare find. When Mr. Gagne attempted to deposit the $100,000, the bank notified the police, and the money was seized.

Mr. Smolak claimed the money belonged to the Estate of Mary Moroz, and he applied to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta for summary judgment. The court’s decision in Moroz Estate v Gagne, 2020 was handed down this past November 4.

The Alberta Court of Appeal in Weir-Jones Technical Services Inc. set out the key considerations for an application for summary judgment, based on the test set out by the Supreme Court of Canada. In order to achieve an outcome that is “just, appropriate, and reasonable,” the court laid out four key considerations:

1) Having regard to the record and issues, is it possible to resolve the dispute on a summary basis?

2) Has the moving party met its burden to show that there is no merit or no defence and that there is no genuine issue requiring trial?

3) If the moving party has met its burden, has the resisting party put its best foot forward to demonstrate that there is a genuine issue?

4) Has the presiding judge been left with sufficient confidence to exercise their discretion and summarily resolve the dispute?

The court next turned to the law on finders:

“Orthodoxy has it that the finder of a chattel acquires a title that is good against the entire world except for the true owner […]. A recovered item may have been abandoned by a previous owner. It is self-evident that a finder of ownerless property can face no superior claim. It is not only the true owner who may assert a prior right, but anyone with a valid and subsisting entitlement, including, theoretically, some previous finder. Therefore, a more accurate general proposition is that a finder acquires a title that is good against the world, except for those with a continuing antecedent claim. This is a general statement about the relative rights of owners.” (Bruce Ziff, Principles of Property Law, 7th ed (Toronto: Thomas Reuters, 2018) at 176 [Ziff])

For Mr. Smolak, everything turned on an intent to abandon, a question of fact that relies on, among other things, the passage of time, the nature of the property, and the conduct of the owner. The burden of proving intention to abandon rests with the defendant.

Unfortunately for Mr. Smolak, he had given conflicting statements about his knowledge that gave rise to uncertainty in the court. While cleaning out the house, he had found receipts for gold wafers, and Mary’s daughter had told him about the possibility of hidden money and her parents’ distaste for banks. But Mr. Smolak also said he had no knowledge of any assets hidden in the house, and claimed he would have no intention of abandoning estate assets.

Ultimately, the court dismissed the application for summary judgment, citing its uncertainty and the need to determine Mr. Smolak’s state of mind after putting so much time and effort into cleaning and sorting the personal property and selling the house.

Unable to make a fair and just determination, the court welcomed further affidavits or a possible summary trial. In the meantime, however, it was unable to decide “keepers.”

We will keep you posted. . .

Thanks for reading!

Ian Hull and Daniel Enright

24 Nov

A Perceived Gap in Alberta’s Succession Law

Kira Domratchev Estate Litigation, Support After Death Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

I came across an interesting report on Alberta’s succession law and what is perceived as a gap that has affected family maintenance and support in the province. The report was published by the Alberta Law Reform Institute (ALRI) and can be found here.

In accordance with the Family Law Act in Alberta, a child can apply for and may be entitled to support from a person standing in the place of a parent, when a couple separates. Under the Wills and Succession Act, however, which applies when a person dies, there is no provision addressing the distinction of a “person standing in the place of a parent”. What that means is that while a person who is characterized as a “person standing in the place of a parent” is alive, the child can apply for support under the Family Law Act but if this person dies, that same child has no ability to seek support from the Estate of this person “standing in the place of a parent”.

Consequently, the ALRI is of the view that there is a gap in the law that ought to be rectified on the basis of an equality argument, alone. This report was apparently recently sent to the province of Alberta but there has been no response, as of yet.

In comparing the provisions of the Succession Law Reform Act here in Ontario, it appears that the very issue raised by the ALRI is addressed by section 57(1) where the definition of a “child” includes a grandchild and a person whom the deceased has demonstrated a settled intention to treat as a child of his or her family, except under an arrangement where a child is placed for valuable consideration in a foster home by a person having lawful custody.” [emphasis added]

Certainly, it is important that children be able to bring a support claim against the estates of their parents, where not appropriately provided for out of the estate, even where not formally adopted but clearly treated as a child.

It will be interesting to see what happens and what the province of Alberta will do, if anything, in response to this report from the ALRI.

Thanks for reading!

Kira Domratchev

Find this blog interesting? Please consider these other related posts:

Perils in the Succession of the Family Cottage

B.C.’s Wills, Estates and Succession Act: Claims May be Pursued by Beneficiaries

Testing the waters of Section 72(1)(d) of the Succession Law Reform Act

15 May

Alberta’s Approach to Digital Assets

Nick Esterbauer Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, Power of Attorney, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Our firm has previously blogged and podcasted at length about digital assets and estate planning, and the issue of fiduciary access to digital assets during incapacity and after death.

While digital assets constitute “property” in the sense appearing within provincial legislation, the rights of fiduciaries in respect of these assets are less clear than those relating to tangible assets.  For example, in Ontario, the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, and Estates Administration Act provide that attorneys or guardians of property and estate trustees, respectively, are authorized to manage the property of an incapable person or estate, but these pieces of legislation do not explicitly refer to digital assets.

As we have previously reported, although the Uniform Law Conference of Canada introduced the Uniform Access to Digital Assets by Fiduciaries Act in August 2016, the uniform legislation has yet to be adopted by the provinces of Canada.  However, recent legislative amendment in one of Ontario’s neighbours to the west has recently enhanced the ability of estate trustees to access and administer digital assets.

In Alberta, legislation has been updated to clarify that the authority of an estate trustee extends to digital assets.  Alberta’s Estate Administration Act makes specific reference to “online accounts” within the context of an estate trustee’s duty to identify estate assets and liabilities, providing clarification that digital assets are intended to be included within the scope of estate assets that a trustee is authorized to administer.

In other Canadian provinces, fiduciaries continue to face barriers in attempting to access digital assets.  Until the law is updated to reflect the prevalence of technology and value, whether financial or sentimental, of information stored electronically, it may be prudent for drafting solicitors whose clients possess such assets to include specific provisions within Powers of Attorney for Property and Wills to clarify the authority of fiduciaries to deal with digital assets.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

 

Other blog posts that may be of interest:

03 Apr

Hull on Estates #543 – The Uncertainty of Death and RRSP Taxes

76admin Beneficiary Designations, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In today’s podcast, Noah Weisberg and Sayuri Kagami discuss the Alberta decision of Re Morrison Estate, 2015 ABQB 769, and the issue of who is responsible for the often hefty taxes payable on registered accounts of a deceased person: the beneficiary of the account or the deceased’s Estate.

Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on Noah Weisberg.

Click here for more information on Sayuri Kagami.

11 Dec

When can Alberta courts validate unsigned wills?

Nick Esterbauer Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

Amendments to Alberta’s succession legislation took effect in 2012 to expand the authority of the courts to order that a will is valid, notwithstanding its failure to comply with the formal requirements otherwise imposed under the Wills and Succession Act, SA 2010, c W-12.2 (the “Act”).  Specifically, section 37 of the Act reads as follows:

Court may validate non-compliant will

37 The Court may, on application, order that a writing is valid as a will or a revocation of a will, despite that the writing was not made in accordance with section 15, 16 or 17, if the Court is satisfied on clear and convincing evidence that the writing sets out the testamentary intentions of the testator and was intended by the testator to be his or her will or a revocation of his or her will.

Section 39(2) of the Act addresses the issue of the rectification of a will that has not been signed.  If a court is convinced by “clear and compelling evidence” that the will was not signed as a result of pure mistake or inadvertence and the testator intended to give effect to the document as his or her last will, the court may add a signature to rectify the will.

The recent decision of Edmunds Estate, 2017 ABQB 754, provides clarification regarding the limits of the court’s ability to validate an unsigned will.  In that case, a paralegal had received instructions from the deceased and prepared a will that reflected her instructions, but the new will was never signed by the deceased before she died.  Justice C.M. Jones of the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench found that the amended Act did not provide the Court with the authority to validate an unsigned will in the absence of clear and convincing evidence that the deceased had intended to sign the document and/or that she had failed to do so by inadvertence or mistake.  The deceased could not have been said to have failed to sign the document by mistake, as she died before making arrangements to execute the will, and Justice Jones found that the evidence that the draft will was intended to be her last valid will fell short of what was required by the legislation.

In Ontario, the doctrine of strict compliance applies.  Unless its defects can be cured by way of interpretation or rectification (the scope of which remedy remains limited), a will that does not comply with the formal requirements of the Succession Law Reform Act, RSO 1990, c S.26, will not be treated as valid and cannot be admitted to probate.

With several other provinces recently adding what Justice Jones refers to as “dispensing clauses” into their respective succession legislation, it will be interesting to see whether Ontario follows suit, opening the door to substantial compliance, in time.

Thank you for reading.

Nick Esterbauer

Other blog entries and podcasts that may be of interest:

·        Considering Wills Where No Strict Compliance with Execution Requirements: Part 1

·        Considering Wills Where No Strict Compliance with Execution Requirements: Part 2

·        More on Rectification

30 May

Hull on Estates #521- Removing Opposing Counsel as Lawyers of Record

76admin General Interest, Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Today on Hull on Estates, Ian Hull and Paul Trudelle discuss removing opposing counsel as lawyers of record, and the decisions of Moad v. Shepherd, 2017 ABQB 330 (CanLII) and McKeller Estate v. Powell 1996 CarswellOnt 642.

 Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.
10 Jan

Hull on Estates #501 – Can a foster child inherit from her foster parent’s estate?

Hull & Hull LLP Hull on Estate and Succession Planning, Hull on Estates, Podcasts, PODCASTS / TRANSCRIBED, Show Notes, Show Notes Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

This week on Hull on Estates, David Smith and Laura Betts discuss a recent decision of the Queen’s Bench of Alberta, Matras Estate, 2016 ABQB 728

 Should you have any questions, please email us at webmaster@hullandhull.com or leave a comment on our blog.

Click here for more information on David Smith.

Click here for more information on Laura Betts.

28 May

Into Re Woods: Formal Validity of Wills

Hull & Hull LLP Wills Tags: , , , , , 0 Comments

The issue of how strictly a testator must comply with the formal rules for validly executing a will is one that has encouraged legislative change across the country in recent decades.  If the standard is too high, the result will be the frustration of the testamentary intentions of people who died thinking that they had valid wills when in fact they were invalid.  If the standard is too low, uncertainty as to what qualifies as a valid will and what doesn’t may lead to an increase in litigation.

Ontario maintains a strict compliance regime, requiring that the statutory requirements for valid execution of a will are carefully adhered to and denying courts the authority to validate a document that fails to meet them.  Most other provinces and territories have given their courts at least some authority to cure deficiencies in the execution of a will, provided that the document is found to represent the testamentary intentions of the deceased.

While the debate continues in Ontario, a recent Alberta case may serve to assuage some of the concern that relaxing the strict requirements for execution will lead to the opening of the floodgates.

In Re Woods Estate, the Court of Queen’s Bench considered an application under Alberta’s Wills and Succession Act for a declaration that certain documents were valid as a will.  The deceased, having been advised that she had approximately a year and a half to live, asked one of her sisters to help her retain a lawyer to prepare a will.  In anticipation of the meeting, she took some notes on a pad of paper.  A lawyer later attended at her home and completed a questionnaire used by her firm to take information for a will.  The questionnaire included information about the testator’s choice of executor, the assets, her wishes with respect to her remains, and how she wanted the residue of her estate to be divided.  The lawyer was going to contact the intended executor (an institution) to confirm their willingness to act, and arranged to return several days later to have the will executed.  Unfortunately, the deceased died early the following morning.  The Court had to consider whether to grant probate of the deceased’s notes and/or the questionnaire as representing her last will.

Turning to Alberta’s statute, the Court considered section 14 of the Act which provides that to be valid, a will must be in writing and “contain a signature of the testator that makes it apparent on the face of the document that the testator intended, by signing, to give effect to the writing in the document as the testator’s will”.  There are further sections (15, 16, and 17) that add requirements for a formal will, holograph will, or a military will.  Section 37 of Alberta’s Act allows the Court to relieve a will from the strict requirements under sections 15, 16, and 17, but not 14.  Accordingly, because the notes and the questionnaire were not signed by the deceased with the intention that they have effect as her will, the Court was unable to apply section 37.  The Court also considered whether the Act‘s rectification provisions could be used and held that they could not because they required that the omission of a signature be due to pure mistake or inadvertence.  Here, it was never intended by the deceased that the notes or questionnaire would become a will and so it could not be said that the failure to sign was inadvertent.

Sadly, the presiding judge noted that she was satisfied that the questionnaire accurately reflected the testamentary intentions of the deceased and that she had no doubt the testator would have executed a will on those terms, but that Alberta statute nevertheless did not authorize the Court to validate the will.

As noted in the case, Alberta’s statute takes a “middle position” between strict compliance jurisdictions like Ontario and substantial compliance jurisdictions, where the Court has broader powers to grant probate to a document that is found to represent the testamentary intentions of the deceased notwithstanding the lack of a signature.

It seems that even in provinces where there has been some relaxation of the formal requirements for the valid execution of a will, there may still be cases where a document that is found to represent the testamentary intentions of the deceased will not be admitted to probate.  Alberta’s experience demonstrates that there may be a range of legislative solutions to the formal validity issue, each with its own advantages and disadvantages.

Whether Ontario will move away from strict compliance in the future remains to be seen.

Josh Eisen

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