Tag: aging society

01 Apr

Dementia Care and Robots

Umair Elder Law, General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News, News & Events Tags: , , , 0 Comments

robotWe have recently highlighted some of the interesting ways in which medical and technological experts and policymakers across the globe are responding to dementia. With an aging population and the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, there is a growing need to focus on how to create a more dementia-capable society.

In instances where a individual living with dementia is no longer able to make decisions regarding their care, that responsibility falls to the individual’s substitute decision-maker. Substitute decision-makers may be required to make important and difficult decisions about the incapable person’s care, such as the use of caregivers and home support services.

Individuals who are tasked with making decisions regarding the care and companionship for people living with dementia may soon have a new option available to them. Reuters recently profiled Nadine, a humanoid robot developed by scientists at the Nanyang Technological University that may someday be used as a companion for individuals living with dementia.

According to the university, Nadine is a “social robot,” which means that she has a memory and personality of her own and is able to exhibit moods and emotions. Nadine currently works as a receptionist at the university, and could also serve as a personal assistant or companion to the elderly.

Nadine’s creator, Professor Nadia Thalmann of the Nanyang Technological University, has suggested that Nadine may be particularly useful as a companion for individuals who are living with dementia. She is quoted in Reuters as saying, “if you leave [individuals with dementia] alone they will be going down very quickly. So these people need to always be in interaction.”

With human-like features and emotional intelligence to boot, Nadine provides an interesting example of the creative ways in which technology could address the needs of people living with dementia. We recently highlighted another example: the story of “Paro” the harp seal, a Japanese automoton that was one of the earlier robotic inventions to be used in dementia care. However, it remains to be seen if this new technology will ultimately be put to use in individual and institutional care settings.

In the meantime, if you would like to see Nadine the humanoid robot at work, don’t miss this YouTube video of Nadine interacting with Professor Thalmann.

Thank you for reading and have a great weekend,

Umair Abdul Qadir

11 Dec

Responding to Dementia, Here and Across the Globe

Umair Elder Law, General Interest, Health / Medical, In the News Tags: , , , 0 Comments

The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias means that policymakers and various sectors – including the legal community — have to think about how to create a more dementia-capable society.

For instance, I recently blogged about DementiaHack, a Toronto-based hackathon designed to bring medical experts on dementia together with developers and designers to think of innovative technological products to address the needs of individuals living with dementia, caregivers and researchers.

For those who are interested in learning more about dementia, the Toronto Star recently ran an excellent series of articles about local and global responses to the increasing prevalence of dementia.

I found it particularly interesting to read about the lessons that can be learned from Japan’s experience, where dementia currently affects 4.62 million people. As the article notes, Japan’s health ministry and 11 other ministries and agencies implemented a strategy in 2012 to address the challenges of dementia. The government also introduced a long-term care insurance program in 2000 that requires residents to pay monthly insurance premiums after they turn 40. By contributing to the program, residents become eligible to access services such as dementia daycare.

Beyond governmental action on dementia, the Star also profiled the Dementia Support Caravan initiative in Japan, which aims to educate and empower people across the country to better support the needs of people living with dementia. And for a Canadian spin on the Japanese experience, be sure to check out this article about “Paro”, a robot that was inspired by a Japanese engineer’s encounter with a Canadian harp seal and that is now being used in dementia care.

The Toronto Star ended its series on dementia with an editorial calling on the provincial and federal governments to create a national strategy. It remains to be seen if policymakers will heed the call to action, but the series offers remarkable insight into how other countries are responding to the increasing prevalence of dementia.

Thank you for reading and have a great weekend.

Umair Abdul Qadir

16 Oct

“Hacking” Dementia

Umair Capacity, Elder Law, General Interest, Health / Medical Tags: , , , , , , 0 Comments

Here are some sobering facts: according to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 747,000 Canadians were living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in 2011. If nothing changes in Canada, this figure is expected to rise to 1.4 million people by 2031.

Beyond the economic costs, dementia can put immense pressures on family caregivers. According to the Alzheimer Society, family caregivers spent 444 million unpaid hours in 2011 towards the care of someone living with dementia, a number that could rise to 1.2 billion unpaid hours per year by 2040.

Given the increasing prevalence of dementia, many sectors – including the legal community – are thinking about how to improve the quality of life for people with dementia and create a more dementia-capable society. For example, I recently came across an interesting event called DementiaHack, a hackathon that will be taking place in Toronto from November 7 to 9, 2015.

For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, a “hackathon” is an event that allows tech types – such as computer programmers and software developers – to work collaboratively on new projects over a short timeframe. Now in its second year, DementiaHack brings together leading medical experts on dementia with developers and designers, challenging them to develop new and innovative products to address the needs of individuals living with dementia, as well as family caregivers, institutional caregivers and researchers.

For this year’s event, hackathon teams will work intensively over the weekend to develop innovative solutions to the challenges of dementia. The weekend will culminate in science fair demos on Sunday, November 8. Then, on November 9, the hackathon finalists will show off their wares to an audience of potential investors and customers. The most successful teams will be eligible to receive a number of different prizes, including a grand prize that consists of a business trip to the United Kingdom to pitch their project at a health conference.

It is exciting to see the work that is being done to support the needs of people living with dementia. If you are interested in learning more about DementiaHack, visit their website for more information about this year’s event. And be sure to check out the Youtube video for the demonstration for last year’s grand prize winner, CareUmbrella, a project that used smartphones and Near Field Communication (NFC) tags to help improve the lived experience of people living with dementia.

Thank you for reading and have a great weekend.

Umair Abdul Qadir

15 Nov

Frustrated and Marginalized

Hull & Hull LLP Power of Attorney Tags: , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

In our rapidly aging society, powers of attorney for personal care and property are now widespread and their importance is recognized by the general public. A family member or friend can also apply to the court to be appointed guardian of the person or the person’s property if powers of attorney have not been executed. However, family members often find themselves in a situation where a loved one is being legally cared for by a family member, or friend of the incapable person, who they no longer like or trust. 

A common complaint that I hear is from family members or friends who feel excluded from participating in or influencing decisions regarding the incapable person, particularly when it comes to personal care.  

However, under the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, which generally governs the rights of an incapable person, any person, with leave, can seek directions from the court on any question arising under a power of attorney (the same is true regarding a court appointed guardian). Pursuant to sections 39 and 68 of the Act, the court may give such directions as it considers to be for the benefit of the incapable person and consistent with the Act.

Section 66(1) of the Act sets out the duties of an attorney for personal care (section 32 is the corresponding section for an attorney for property). In general, the attorney is required to exercise his or her duties and powers with diligence and in good faith. 

Section 66(6) also states that an attorney must foster regular personal contact between the incapable person and supportive family members and friends. Moreover, section 66(7) states that the attorney shall consult with supportive family members and friends who are in regular contact with the incapable person, as well as the incapable person’s caregivers. 

The requirements of section 66, coupled with the ability to seek directions from the court, offer family members and friends the means to ensure that they remain involved with their loved ones and are not simply sidelined. Proceeding to court is always expensive. However, where there is genuine concern and frustration that the incapable person is not being properly cared for and/or his or her finances are being squandered, recourse can be had to the courts.

Ciao!

Justin

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