Tag: advertisement

01 May

How “Jiffy pop” washed my childhood brain

Ian Hull Estate & Trust, Estate Litigation, Estate Planning, General Interest, Uncategorized Tags: , 0 Comments

It started innocently enough. I was in a supermarket with my son on the weekend, and he picked up a Jiffy pop container and handed it to me. You likely know the product – a round tinfoil container with oil and kernels that expands when heated over a stove to produce popcorn.

I didn’t even know they still made it – it was something more common in the 60s and 70s before microwave popcorn took off. I laughed and we stuck it in the grocery cart for fun and went home.

Later that afternoon, my son turned on the stove and started making the popcorn. I told him that I could still chant the Jiffy pop jingle. And out of my mouth it came:

Jiffy pop, Jiffy pop the magic treat – as much fun to make as it is to eat.

Where did that come from? I hadn’t thought about Jiffy pop in 30 years. Why did I still remember a jingle from my childhood? Were 30-second Jiffy pop commercials like this one that powerful?

Advertising can work – for many years

Apparently so. And it got me thinking: what other products were etched into my mind in childhood, and could potentially still be playing a role in my purchasing decisions today?

Research has shown that there can be a connection. Studies published in the Journal of Consumer Research looked at adult judgments of the healthiness of products, some of which were heavily advertised during the person’s childhood. The study found that when children under age 13 were exposed to advertising using characters, they develop positive long-term feelings towards the characters and the brands’ nutrition for years to come. You can read a short summary of the studies here.

While this study focussed on “characters” in advertising (think Tony the Tiger, Ronald McDonald, the Kool-aid animated jug), I wonder if other associations from childhood also work, like jingles? I can still rhyme off the ingredients in a Big Mac, and say the words to Coke’s “I’d like to teach the world to sing” song. Is that why a Big Mac and a Coke still represent comfort food to me today (even if I don’t indulge)?

Re-examine product decision

Buying habits – and fond associations – can keep us locked into many things whose benefits may be long past their best-before dates. So, it’s never a bad thing to reconsider what you buy and why you buy it. You may never kick that Cap’n Crunch habit, or the lose the magic of Jiffy pop, but at least you’ll be self-aware when you make your next purchase.

Thanks for reading!
Ian M. Hull

10 Jul

Notice to Creditors…Online

Noah Weisberg Estate & Trust, Estate Planning, Executors and Trustees, General Interest, In the News, Trustees Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

Debt owing by an individual does not terminate upon death.  The estate trustee is therefore obliged to satisfy any outstanding debts owing from the assets of the estate even after an individual has passed away.  I recently came across a new service which assists estate trustees in locating any such debts in order to satisfy them.

Generally speaking, an estate trustee is not personally liable for debts owed by the deceased.  However, if debts remain and the estate trustee distributes the assets of the estate, they may be personally liable to satisfy them.  In order to avoid  personal liability, estate trustees advertise for creditors in accordance with section 53 of the Trustees Act, often referred to as Notice to Creditors.  According to this section, an estate trustee will not be personally liable for claims by creditors should they place a ‘notice’ specifying a period of time in which claims by creditors must be made.  It is important to note that a Notice to Creditors does not prevent creditors from tracing distributable assets to beneficiaries.

The Trustee Act does not specifically provide how such a ‘notice’ must be posted.  However, it has become common practice to advertise multiple times in a local newspaper where the deceased domiciled, and wait at least 30 days before taking steps to administer the estate.

A new service, NoticeConnect, publishes these notices to creditors online.  According to the creators of the site, “…publishing notices with NoticeConnect is superior to print advertising because the notice will be found by any creditor conducting a basic Google search and because the ad is promoted across multiple internet platforms with larger potential audiences than print newspapers”.

Furthermore, proceeding online “…is an economical option for the many solicitors and estate trustees who are not publishing Notice to Creditors because of prohibitively high costs, exposing themselves to potential liability”.

Full details of the service provided by NoticeConnect can be found on their website.

Noah Weisberg

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